5 Ways to Prioritize Your Mental Health

Healthcare is rife with people who care for others, but often neglect themselves. Try these five ways to better prioritize your mental health.

Oftentimes, those who work in healthcare, spending their days caring for others, do not extend the same level of care to themselves. Maybe it’s because you’re too tired to do so at the end of the day, or perhaps, you just plain don’t know how to practice good self care. Whatever the reason, you really should take better care of yourself—particularly, your mental health.

In an industry rife with a burnout problem, on the heels of the most devastating health crisis in modern history, during Mental Health Awareness Month, if you have not been making your mental health a priority, now is certainly a good time to start.

Try these five ways to better prioritize your mental health starting now.

Start Saying No

Many who go into healthcare do so because they are drawn to serving others, they want to help. Boundaries, however, are important to set for the sake of your mental health. The word “no” (and learning to use it) has power, and it can positively impact your mental health to say no to things you do not want to or cannot do, be it because they would overwhelm you, disinterest you, or for any other reason. Saying no is not selfish, does not need to be justified, and it is something you should do regularly as part of having healthy boundaries.

Take Breaks

In the same vein as saying no, you should take time for yourself more often. Just because you can do something, or have the time in your schedule, that does not mean you need to. Slow down, rest, relax, and recharge—whatever that looks like for you, be it actually taking a lunch break or taking an entire vacation. Listen to your body and mind and give it what it needs. Everything else can wait.

Stay Active

Studies show that regular exercise can have a positive impact on depression and anxiety, and can also relieve stress, improve memory, help you sleep better, and boost your overall mood. Though you may not have time for a trip to the gym seven days a week, make time to move for at least ten to fifteen minutes every day. Take a short walk, jog with your dog, go for a swim, practice some yoga—anything that gets your heart rate up and causes you to breathe a little heavier than normal counts.

Get Some Sleep

Without good sleep, our mental health can suffer. However, mental health disorders may make it harder to sleep, causing even greater problems. Some helpful ways to get meaningful rest might include hanging blackout curtains, wearing an eye mask, taking melatonin before bed, or setting your thermostat to 65 degrees Fahrenheit for the most comfortable sleep, according to the Sleep Foundation.

Talk to Someone

Sometimes, the best way to care for yourself is to ask others for help. If you are struggling, please know you are not alone. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can help you to process what you are experiencing. If you need support, reach out to them at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Helpline: Call 1-800-662-HELP
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

4 Ways to Spring Clean for Your Job Search

Spring is, traditionally, one of the best times to make a career move. Here’s how to spring clean for your job search, and get growing elsewhere.

Spring has arrived, and for many, it has brought with it a mindset of growth, change, and new beginnings. It is also, traditionally, one of the best times to make a career move, with employers eager to lock in and onboard new hires before Memorial Day. If you find that you are no longer blooming where you are currently planted, it may be time to set down new roots. Here’s how to spring clean for your job search, and get growing elsewhere.

Weed Out What You Don’t Want

The last year has been hard for many, especially those who work in healthcare. Take stock of what you do and do not want, and what you will and will not accept, especially in terms of your career, and figure out what roles might align with this mindset. If you have been in a demanding patient-facing role, maybe look into what non-clinical roles might be a good fit for you. Or if you have been working in a high-volume hospital, maybe it’s time to consider making a shift to a more rural setting, or into private practice. Bored with your specialty? It might be time to retrain in another. Get out of the weeds, and give yourself a chance to grow in a role better suited for you.

Tidy Up Your Resume

Once you know what you are looking for, it’s time to dust off the ol’ resume. Make sure all of the information on your resume, social media, and job search profiles is current (and, regarding social media, appropriate), and that it properly reflects what you are looking for in your next role. This article we shared at the start of the year is a great place to pick up some tips on how to revamp your resume. And, of course, we recommend you update your profile on HealthJobsNationwide.com, as well.

Branch Out via Your Network

Learning to ask for help isn’t always easy, but when it comes to your job search, it can make all the difference. “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know,” is a popular saying for a reason, and so is, “more hands make light work.” Reach out to those in your network and let them know you are on the hunt for a new opportunity. You may be surprised by just how willing your friends, old and new, will be to help you, and who they may know that you may not. Someone in-the-know could connect you to a decision maker in a more personal way than if you just applied online, or you may be able to find out about a job before it is posted, putting you at an advantage. Take the time to make new connections on social media (or in person, if you’re comfortable), and use those connections to your benefit. And be sure to take out the trash, too, while you’re at it, cutting ties with any toxic people in your life who aren’t rooting for you to win.

Nurture Yourself

Searching for a new job is not always easy. Despite demand for healthcare professionals being higher than most other industries, that does not mean there isn’t healthy competition. You may not land your dream job right away, forcing you to stay in a less satisfying role or remain unemployed. While that certainly is not ideal, it is imperative that you not get discouraged and be kind to yourself during the process. Clear out your negative thoughts, practice good self care, and rest when you need to. Nothing blooms the same day it is planted. Give it time.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our Nation’s Healthcare Workers Are Not Okay

According to the results of our recent survey on mental health, simply put, our nation’s healthcare workers are not okay. See the responses here.

Ten months ago, as COVID-19 raged through our nation, we surveyed healthcare professionals on the state of their mental health, and the responses we received painted a stark picture of what they were being asked to endure as “healthcare’s heroes”.

Now, more than a year after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March of 2020, we’ve again asked healthcare professionals about their mental state, and the results are grim, to say the least.

Despite COVID-19 vaccinations ramping up across the country, and cases of the virus continuing to trend downward, according to the responses shared with us, our nation’s healthcare workers are, simply put, not okay.

The survey, which saw responses from registered nurses, advanced practitioners, respiratory therapists, and more, asked healthcare professionals to rate their current mental health, as well as their mental health prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. On average, prior to the pandemic, respondents ranked their mental health as an 8.23 out of 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent. 4.06 out of 10 is how the same respondents ranked their current mental health a year into the pandemic, down from an average of 5.44 out of 10 when we posed the same question in May of 2020.

Respondents also clearly expressed just how much they feel the pandemic has worsened their mental health (9/10) and, though vaccinations provide a promising outlook for a return to some semblance of normalcy, when asked how much they feel the approval and administration of COVID-19 vaccines has improved their mental health, the average response was a dismal 5.69 out of 10.

The average results were as follows, including selected quotes from respondents.

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your mental health prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Average Answer: 8.21/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your current mental health?
Average Answer: 4.06/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your level of work-related stress prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Average Answer: 6.03/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your current level of work-related stress?
Average Answer: 8.09/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how well do you believe you are coping with your work-related stress?
Average Answer: 4.81/10

Most Commonly Used Coping Mechanisms:
1. Talking to Family/Friends
2. Humor
3. Physical Activity
4. Tie: Prescription Medication & Other
5. Avoidance
6. Yoga/Meditation
7. Alcohol
8. Therapy
9. Recreational Drugs

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel your job negatively impacts your mental health?
Average Answer: 7.59/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened your mental health?
Average Answer: 9.00/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how important do you feel your mental health is to your employer?
Average Answer: 4.81/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being not very often and 10 being very often, how often have you considered quitting your job in the past year?
Average Answer: 7.06/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the approval and administration of COVID-19 vaccines has improved your mental health?
Average Answer: 5.69/10

Is there anything else you would like to tell us?

“I’m really sick of all this. Management has the expectation that we keep giving and giving with no end in sight.”

“Nurses and other healthcare workers should be acknowledged with better pay and benefits (especially mental health). It will be interesting to see how many workers are diagnosed with PTSD in the coming months and years.”

“I actually did step out of the nursing field for now due to the impact on my mental health and am seeking professional help/intervention.”

“I think overall the entire pandemic situation has been terribly managed on both a federal and corporate levels. I would go in to more detail but I can already feel my blood pressure going up! But thanks for asking!”

“The lack of support from management, working short staffed every day, wearing PPE that is not for medical use, the lack of transparency, the overall mental health of patients, increase in meth, alcohol, and heroin use, the constant mental abuse from patients has made me consider selling my house, changing my lifestyle, and getting rid of my car so I can leave my career behind before it takes every last bit of my sanity and potentially my life.”

“Half of our staff has left to do travel nursing for 3X what they were making. These are seasoned nurses with years of experience. These nurses are not being replaced, we have 3 travelers to replace the 22 that have left since December. We are working extremely, dangerously short staffed with nurses who have NO ICU experience & management does not offer a plan. I know more will be leaving.”

“Each time I hear the government tell people not to wear masks I get stressed worrying about more deaths from COVID. The public trying to promote COVID as a government conspiracy. Most of the people who are recovering from COVID do not return to the normal life they had before COVID. ”

“I DID quit. I retired a year earlier than I had planned just to get away from the stress. I have been doing temporary gig work and LOVE it. Get to do the job and go home.”

“I feel management and the organization is doing very little to help the bedside nurse feel better during this pandemic. They are almost trying to make things worse.”

“If I were home all the time and not working with the kids and other staff, I would be much worse.”

Prior to the pandemic, multiple occupations within the field were already considered high stress and the suicide risk was identified as being higher among nurses than any other profession, making the findings especially alarming. With experts predicting an escalating mental health crisis for Americans as a whole, it is especially important for healthcare professionals to be aware of their mental health, and to seek help as needed.

If you are struggling with your mental health, we urge you to ask for help. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can assist you in processing what you are experiencing. Reach out to them, if you need support at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Survey: A Year into the Pandemic, How Is Your Mental Health?

One year after being declared a pandemic, COVID-19 is still here. As someone who works in healthcare, how is your mental health now? Tell us here.

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic.

Since that time, more than 28 million Americans have contracted the virus, with over 500,000 of them, sadly, succumbing to it, and healthcare’s heroes, as you have often been called, have seen it all.

And we see you.

Working in healthcare can be incredibly draining—mentally, physically, and emotionally. Especially when you take into account the fact that many positions within the field are considered high-stress occupations, and that the suicide risk among nurses is higher than any other profession. Add in a full year of an unprecedented pandemic, and that can be a lot for anyone to handle, hero or otherwise.

So, a year on, we wanted to check in on you, gather your thoughts, share them with your peers. How is your mental health? How are you coping, or not coping, right now? Have you considered leaving your job? Did the approval of multiple COVID-19 vaccines help your mental health?

Tell us in the survey below, and then be sure to read our tips on how to care for yourself while treating COVID-19 patients by clicking here.

Name:*
Email Address:*
Title:*
Specialty:*
Are you working on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic in any capacity?*
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your mental health prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your current mental health?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your level of work-related stress prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your current level of work-related stress?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how well do you believe you are coping with your work-related stress?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
What coping mechanisms are you currently relying on to help you deal with work-related stress?*
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel your job negatively impacts your mental health?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened your mental health?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how important do you feel your mental health is to your employer?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being not very often and 10 being very often, how often have you considered quitting your job in the past year?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the approval and administration of COVID-19 vaccines has improved your mental health?*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Is there anything else you would like to tell us?

By submitting this form, you are giving your permission to HealthJobsNationwide.com to republish any responses included on this form in future content that may be used on our website or social media accounts.

Verify You're a Human:

If you are struggling with your mental health, we urge you to ask for help. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can assist you in processing what you are experiencing. Reach out to them, if you need support at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Winter Blues? Here Are Healthcare Jobs in Warm Locales.

If this weather has you dreaming of warmer locales, here are the 5 cities with the warmest average temps in February, and their most in-demand healthcare jobs.

This month, a record-breaking deep freeze impacted most of the United States, leaving more than 70% of the lower 48 states blanketed in snow and millions without power. If this weather has you dreaming of warmer locales, here are the five cities with the warmest average temperatures in February, and the most in-demand healthcare jobs in each location, according to data from our job board.

1. Miami, FL

Average Temperature in February: 70.0°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Respiratory Therapist
3. Physician
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Dental Assistant
Search All Jobs in Miami, FL →

2. Palm Springs, CA

Average Temperature in February: 64.5°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Physician
3. Speech Language Pathologist
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physical Therapist
Search All Jobs in Palm Springs, CA →

3. Tampa, FL

Average Temperature in February: 63.2°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
3. Certified Nursing Assistant
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physician
Search All Jobs in Tampa, FL →

4. Phoenix, AZ

Average Temperature in February: 59.8°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Medical Assistant
3. Certified Nursing Assistant
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physical Therapist
Search All Jobs in Phoenix, AZ →

5. Los Angeles, CA

Average Temperature in February: 58.9°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Physician
3. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
4. Speech Language Pathologist
5. Nurse Practitioner
Search All Jobs in Los Angeles, CA →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

These Are the Best Healthcare Jobs in America

Healthcare professionals have received a lot of praise over the last year, often being lauded as heroes. But which healthcare jobs ranked as the best?

Those who work in healthcare have always known how essential their jobs are. The rest of the world learned this in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold and forever changed the way the healthcare profession will be viewed by the general public. Physicians and Registered Nurses, in particular, were heaped with praise, becoming the heroes of our nation and the world.

But which healthcare jobs are best? Not the most celebrated or well-recognized, but the best—best for salary, work-life balance, stress level, the job market, and future growth. U.S. News & World Report released their annual rankings based on these very metrics. The 20 best healthcare jobs according to their findings are listed below.

1. Physician Assistant

Overall Score: 8.3 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.4/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $112,260
Other Rankings: #1 in 100 Best Jobs, #1 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Physician Assistant Jobs →

2. Nurse Practitioner

Overall Score: 8.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 10/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $109,820
Other Rankings: #3 in 100 Best Jobs, #3 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs →

3. Physician

Overall Score: 7.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $206,500
Other Rankings: #5 in 100 Best Jobs, #8 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Physician Jobs →

4. Speech-Language Pathologist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $79,120
Other Rankings: #7 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Speech-Language Pathologist Jobs →

5. Dentist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 9.9/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $155,600
Other Rankings: #7 in Best STEM Jobs, #9 in 100 Best Jobs, #11 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Dentist Jobs →

6. Veterinarian

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $95,460
Other Rankings: #10 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Veterinarian Jobs →

7. Orthodontist

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 8/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #5 in Best Paying Jobs, #8 in Best STEM Jobs, #11 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Orthodontist Jobs →

8. Anesthesiologist

Overall Score: 7.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #1 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Anesthesiologist Jobs →

9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #3 in Best Paying Jobs, #18 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Jobs →

10. Occupational Therapist

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $84,950
Other Rankings: #19 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Occupational Therapist Jobs →

11. Physical Therapist

Overall Score: 6.9 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.5/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $89,440
Other Rankings: #21 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Physical Therapist Jobs →

12. Psychiatrist

Overall Score: 6.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 6/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #7 in Best Paying Jobs, #27 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Psychiatrist Jobs →

13. Prosthodontist

Overall Score: 6.7 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #6 in Best Paying Jobs, #35 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Prosthodontist Jobs →

14. Registered Nurse

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.8/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $73,300
Other Rankings: #37 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Registered Nurse Jobs →

15. Nurse Anesthetist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $174,790
Other Rankings: #10 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in Best STEM Jobs, #39 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Nurse Anesthetist Jobs →

16. Obstetrician and Gynecologist — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #4 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Obstetrician and Gynecologist Jobs →

16. Surgeon — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #2 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Surgeon Jobs →

18. Chiropractor

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.6/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $70,340
Other Rankings: #44 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Chiropractor Jobs →

19. Podiatrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.9/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $126,240
Other Rankings: #18 in Best Paying Jobs, #46 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Podiatrist Jobs →

20. Optometrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.5/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $115,250
Other Rankings: #22 in Best Paying Jobs, #48 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Optometrist Jobs →

How do you feel about the rankings? Does your job seem like it’s the “best”? The worst? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Get Your Résumé Ready for the New Year

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job—a resolution that landed on a list of the most popular resolutions for 2021—now is the time to get your résumé in prime shape. While hiring was obviously impacted in many ways over the course of 2020, traditionally, hiring ramps big time once the calendar rolls over into January. If you are seeking a change for the year ahead, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

New Year, New Look

The New Year, for many, is often time for a bold change, and your résumé should be no exception. Start out by updating the look and feel of your résumé. Your goal should be to have a résumé that is easy to follow and one that instantly reflects who you are and what you can do. Some quick tips for giving your résumé a makeover include:

  • Start with an easy-to-follow, modern template that has clearly defined sections of information. Some great examples of résumés like these can be found here, here, and here.
  • Identify and use a tagline for yourself. You aren’t just a nurse or a doctor. “NICU RN-BSN, BLS and ACLS Certified” or “Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician” tucked beneath your name at the top of your résumé affords the reader insight into your qualifications before they even really begin to dig into your document.
  • Update your contact information to current standards. Listing your mailing address is less important these days than linking to your online social profiles. Include, at a minimum, a URL for your LinkedIn account, and any other professionally acceptable social accounts you may hold. Also, be sure to include your email address, but only if it’s one that can be taken seriously, and not something like GlitterSparkleButterfly@whatever.com.
  • Throw out the old objective section in favor of a short, professional summary, and stock it with your most impressive qualifications and accomplishments, which you should then expand upon in your experience and education sections.

Take Stock of 2020

Now that your résumé has a new look for the new year, the content will need updating, as well. With 2020 firmly in the rearview, take time to reflect on all that happened over the course of the year. What did you accomplish? What new skills did you learn? Did you gain any new certifications or degrees? Did you receive any special recognition? Did you take on any new responsibilities?

Also, and probably most importantly, take the time to reflect on what you truly want out of 2021 and beyond. If 2020 taught us anything, it is that time is precious. You should spend your time doing what you love, and your résumé should position you to find a job that fits into that—not just a job that you fit into.

Look back on where the previous year has taken you, and then update the appropriate sections of your résumé to reflect any worthwhile highlights. You will also want to trim the fat, so to speak, from previous years, if there is anything listed that is no longer relevant or has become less impressive over time.

Lastly, take note of keywords that are frequently used in the job postings you have been browsing and make sure you include as many of them as possible in the text of your résumé. Doing so will increase your odds of being labeled as a match for the jobs to which you plan to apply.

Get Online

If you are like the bulk of the population, you will likely be applying to jobs online in 2021, be it on our site or elsewhere, making the online version of your résumé just as important as the paper copy you will bring with you when you go in to interview for said jobs. Make sure you upload your updated résumé to our site and any others you may be using to browse for jobs, and also take the time to revamp your LinkedIn profile to match your reworked résumé, and update any other social accounts you plan to disclose to potential employers (or lock down the ones you don’t plan to share via privacy preferences).

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our 5 Most Popular Articles of 2020

In case you missed any of these worthwhile reads the first time around, we’ve compiled a list of our most popular articles of 2020. Read them here.

With the arrival of 2021, we thought it might be a good time to take a look back at our most popular articles from the year that was 2020. Given they all garnered a lot of traffic over the year, there is a chance you might have seen some of these articles before. However, in case you missed any of these very worthwhile posts the first time around, we have put together the list below.

Please note that we are aware these are not all uplifting reads, but a lot of them are certainly important ones, highlighting the long and trying year 2020 was for many. To shy away from how hard this past year was for you, your loved ones, your patients, and the world as a whole would be doing you a disservice. We thank you immensely for your dedication to your profession and to the lives of your patients this year, and we are fervently wishing you much health, happiness, and healing in 2021.

Without further ado, here are our top five most popular articles from 2020.

1. Freebies, Discounts, & Perks for Healthcare’s Heroes


To recognize the heroic efforts of frontline medical staff, companies are offering promotions as a way of giving back. Here’s a giant list of them.
Read More →

2. The Top 10 Pandemic-Proof Healthcare Jobs


Healthcare is often touted as a recession-proof industry. But is it pandemic-proof? Given the number of available jobs, it seems so. See the most in-demand position types here.
Read More →

3. 10 Healthcare Roles Top Riskiest List


In what may come as a surprise to very few, the top ten riskiest jobs in terms of possible COVID-19 exposure are patient-facing roles in healthcare.
Read More →

4. How to Cope When You Hate Your Job


Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.
Read More →

5. Mental Health of Healthcare Workers Has Tanked Amid Pandemic


The COVID-19 pandemic is clearly taking a toll on the mental health of our nation’s healthcare workers, according to the findings of our recent survey.
Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

What Healthcare’s Heroes Are Giving Thanks for This Year

“What are you thankful for?” we asked, and you answered. Here’s what healthcare professionals are most thankful for in this year like no other.

What are you thankful for?

The question may seem simple, but, for many, we know it is not simple at all.

2020 has been a year that has brought about tremendous uncertainty, and one that has caused so many to face unthinkable circumstances, particularly those who work in healthcare. You have seen some truly harrowing things this year, have been asked to reach even further past your burnout, to save this nation. You have been called heroes, and rightly so.

And, for some, given all you’ve endured, it is almost hard to fathom that there has been anything good in this year. That there have been victories and triumphs. That hope lives on.

But no matter what situation this year has found you in, we promise you, there are still things to be thankful for. Even if it is just the breath in your lungs or the dawn of a new day. Small miracles are miracles all the same, and there are always reasons to be thankful.

“What are you thankful for?” we asked, and you answered. Here’s what healthcare professionals are most thankful for this year.

“I’m grieving, but I’m grateful. We, as a country, and as an industry, have lost so much. We have been through so much. But this year has taught me to take nothing for granted, and in a weird, terrible way, I’m thankful for that.”
— Alexis M., Nurse Practitioner


“I am thankful for the fellow healthcare workers who took care of my daughter while she was being diagnosed with a rare lung disease during a time when they were already taxed and tired. [And] I’m thankful to be one of the most accessible healthcare workers during a time when many patients could not access their primary care teams.”
— Michelle H., Pharmacist


“Honestly, I’m not thankful for much. But I am thankful to be alive. After losing patients and coworkers to the virus, that’s definitely something to be grateful for. I am still here, and I am thankful for that.”
— Brian O., Registered Nurse


“I’m thankful for my knowledge, my passion, and my strength, which have enabled me to be there for my patients during this very hard year.”
— Jennifer R., Licensed Practical Nurse


“Let’s cut right to the chase: I’m thankful for science, and I’m not very thankful for those who have denied it this year.”
— David S., Physician


“Each day is a gift, life is fragile.”
— Marie S., Cardiology/EKG Technician


“Health, family, being able to keep working.”
— Pedro C., Physician


“I am thankful for my family, for keeping my spirits up and for being there for me always, and that goes for my work family, too.”
— Jessica J., Registered Nurse


“I’m just thankful to still have a job. I know a lot of people can’t say that right now.”
— Megan T., Medical Billing Specialist


“[I’m thankful] that the healthcare field is always and will always be there when needed. I’m grateful to be in such a powerful sector that has come through time and time again for the public. I’m thankful for being a healthcare worker.”
— Loretta I., Mental Health Associate


“That after 44 years as a nurse, 42 years being in surgery, my family when we celebrated my retirement made me realize that everyday I made a difference in someones life. I didn’t just go to an office and help my boss or company make money.”
— Linda W., Registered Nurse


“I’m thankful for my faith, my family, and my life. This year. Always.”
— Heather G., Speech-Language Pathologist


No matter what this year has found you thankful for, please know that all of us here at HealthJobsNationwide.com are profoundly thankful for you. Wishing you and yours a safe and happy Thanksgiving.
Most Sincerely,
The HealthJobsNationwide.com Team

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare’s Spookiest Jobs

From those who draw blood with the ease of a vampire, to those who stalk the halls of hospitals in the dark of night, healthcare is full of spooky jobs.

Halloween is upon us. A time when regular folks break out the blood and guts for decoration. For some healthcare workers, though, blood and guts can be the makings of a normal workday.

From those who draw blood with the ease of a vampire, to those who stalk the halls of hospitals in the dark of night, healthcare is full of jobs that can give the average ghoul or goblin a fright. So, we’ve compiled a list of healthcare’s spookiest jobs, ranked in no particular order—because, let’s be real, it’s 2020 and everything is pretty spooky right about now.

? Phlebotomists

Why So Spooky: Blood. That’s about it. Because of blood, and the fact that phlebotomists willingly and easily remove blood from the bodies of living human beings. If that doesn’t give you the chills, you might want to check yourself for a pulse.

? Pathologists

Why So Spooky: Pathologists closely examine a body’s organs, tissues, body fluids, cells, and molecules—also known as, ya know, guts. Bonus spooky points for forensic pathologists, in particular, because they do all of that with dead bodies. If we ever have a zombie outbreak, we’re counting on you fine folks to sort it out.

? Forensic Scientists

Why So Spooky: Speaking of dead bodies. Forensic scientists work with law enforcement to analyze evidence and investigate crimes. Crimes like murder. They can also be experts in things like bloodstain pattern analysis and body identification, so there’s certainly no shortage of spooky here.

? Nocturnists & Night-Shift Nurses

Why So Spooky: Things that go bump in the night—like a physician stalking the halls of the hospital at all hours of the night. Because that’s their job. They work overnight. Also, not to be forgotten, night-shift nurses. Particularly on nights that have full moons. When they work in the ER. If you know, you know.

? Medical Waste Disposal Technicians

Why So Spooky: There are four types of medical waste: general, infectious, hazardous, and radioactive. That includes bodily fluids. And used syringes. And radioactive waste. And someone has to be the person to make that stuff disappear. Sounds like a horror film waiting to happen, doesn’t it? Particularly, if something goes wrong with that radioactive waste.

? Correctional Medicine

Why So Spooky: It takes a special kind of nurse, advanced practitioner, or physician to clock in at the clink, surrounded by any number violent criminals, including murderers, who could easily be the inspiration for a slasher film. And though those criminals obviously need medical care, too, it’s not likely they’re fans of the Hippocratic Oath, having done harm to others. That’ll give you a fright, for sure.

? Honorable Mention: Every Other Healthcare Job

Why So Spooky: Because, again, it’s 2020. And we’re seven long months into a global pandemic with no real end in sight. Maybe some nice witch will spend their Halloween breaking the collective curse we’re all under, though, and things will be okay again soon. Fingers crossed.

From your friends at HealthJobsNationwide.com, we wish you many treats and zero tricks this year. And if you’ll be working this Halloween (when there will be a full moon (while Mercury is in retrograde (in, ya know, the year 2020))), we wish you the absolute best of luck. Stay safe out there.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.