Tools That Are Helpful With Charting

Basic but Helpful Charting Tools

Medical note charting and medical transcription are necessary parts of the nation’s healthcare system. With more and more organizations needing to convert paper charts and analog records to electronic and digital counterparts, the need for services like these is increasing in demand. If you want to make money doing this kind of work, then you need to know specific tools that are helpful with medical note charting.

A Computer
Whether it’s a laptop or a desktop, you need a computer that can run your preferred transcription platform and software. Fortunately, such machines are relatively affordable given how powerful computers have become in recent years. Just make sure it also has the right software, too.

A Good Headset
For many transcriptionists, verbal input works better than mouse and keyboard. A microphone can work, but a headset stays closer to your mouth and is less likely to pick up background noises, creating a higher efficiency rate and more accurate transcription.

Transcription Service
There might be times that you get behind enough that it becomes overwhelming. Having a third-party service, such as Mercedes Transcription Inc. you can outsource your work to let help you lighten your load. For that matter, if they charge less for the work than you do, you can just be a middleman and make a profit while someone else handles the work for you.

A Desk
Many people who work from desktops or laptops love heading out to a coffee shop or restaurant and doing some work from there. However, given the confidential nature of medical transcription, working outside the home or office isn’t always a good idea. You need a central space, preferably with privacy, where you can sit down and focus on your work.

An Organizer
Keeping up with your workload requires self-motivation, but it is mostly about staying organized. An organizer, whether paper or digital, can help you break your workload into segments you can manage on a daily basis while still meeting all of your deadlines.

Medical Note Charting Makes Money
Medical note charting was a high-paying gig long before the ‘gig economy’ was a general concept. If you’re involved in this profession, then you need a computer, an effective microphone or headset, a backup transcription option, a place to work, and an organizer. Whether you do this full-time or just for some extra income, these tools will make medical note charting much easier to accomplish.

Rachelle Wilber
Bio: Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber; https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009221637700

 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Helping Behind the Scenes: 5 Advantages to Being a Medical Lab Professional

If you’re looking for a career in healthcare behind the scenes, being a medical lab professional could be a great option.

Physicians and other clinicians rely heavily on lab testing to help care for patients. That means the medical lab professionals who conduct those tests are vitally important. As the volume of testing grows and new types of testing emerge, medical lab professionals will continue to be in great demand.

If you’d like to play an active, hands-on role in the healthcare field but aren’t necessarily drawn to working directly with patients, becoming a medical lab professional could be a great fit for you.

Below, I’ll describe five advantages to being a medical lab professional. But first, let’s take a closer look at the professions I’m talking about.

 

Understanding the roles of medical lab professionals

There are two types of medical lab professionals who commonly perform testing. They vary in the education required and in the kinds of responsibilities they typically have.

1. Medical lab technicians

Medical lab technicians generally work in clinics and other healthcare facilities that provide lab services. They use specialized medical instruments and automated technology to conduct a variety of testing and analysis on specimens taken from patients.

Although they may occasionally have direct patient contact, most of their tasks are conducted within the lab.

A common path to becoming a medical lab technician involves completing a two-year associate degree program. Note that a medical lab technician can pursue further education to become a medical lab scientist (see directly below).

2. Medical lab scientists

Medical lab scientists commonly perform more advanced hands-on lab tests in hospitals and large clinics. These procedures often go beyond the more automated processes that a medical lab technician is likely to perform. In addition, medical lab scientists often take on lab leadership roles.

Working as a medical lab scientist requires at least a bachelor’s degree. Note that there are a number of options you can take to obtain that degree, including a bachelor’s degree completion program.

Let’s now turn to the advantages of a career as a medical lab professional.

1. Become a healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re interested in a healthcare career but are concerned about the time and expense it can take to earn an advanced professional degree, pursuing a career as a medical lab professional could be an excellent option.

For example, you could be working full-time in a medical lab environment in as little as two years by earning the appropriate associate degree. In fact, if you have transferable credits, that time could be even shorter. (See How to Become a Medical Laboratory Technician for more information.)

And with approximately another two years of education, you can obtain a bachelor’s degree in medical laboratory science. This can open up additional opportunities for taking on leadership positions and conducting more advanced lab procedures. (See How to Become a Medical Laboratory Scientist for more information.)

2. Choose a profession with a bright future

Although there are no guarantees when it comes to obtaining employment, you should know the current — and expected — demand for medical lab professions is high.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “70% of today’s medical decisions depend on laboratory test results.” In fact, the COVID-19 pandemic has served to underscore just how crucial medical lab professionals are.

Another encouraging indicator is from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), which projects a positive job growth rate for medical lab professionals over the next decade. (Note: The BLS uses the terms clinical laboratory technicians for medical lab technicians and clinical laboratory technologists for medical lab scientists.)

3. Channel a science background into a valued healthcare profession

If you obtain a medical lab degree, you’re going to have a specific healthcare profession to enter upon graduation. This isn’t necessarily the case if, for example, you major in a subject like biology.

In fact, people who are drawn to medical lab education programs may already have college science credits and even job experience. But what they lack are the credentials to establish a specific career in healthcare.

An associate degree in medical lab technology or a bachelor’s degree in medical lab science can change that.

4. Enjoy a schedule that fits with your lifestyle

Medical lab technicians are typically employed at clinics. That means they generally work steady weekday shifts, during regular daytime hours, with occasional weekend rotations. Also, medical laboratory technicians usually have plenty of opportunities for part-time positions.

Medical lab scientists, who often have positions at hospitals, may work daytime shifts as well as evenings, weekends, and holidays. Note that working non-daytime shifts often comes with additional pay on top of the base hourly wage.

In either case, as a medical lab professional you’ll likely be able to find a schedule that fits well with your lifestyle and your responsibilities outside of work.

5. Play a key role in helping care for patients

Although you may not have a lot of direct interaction with patients, as a medical lab professional you still play a vital part in caring for them. And that can be incredibly rewarding.

On a daily basis, you’ll be using specialized medical instruments and cutting-edge technology to conduct a variety of testing and analyses on specimens taken from patients.

The resulting information helps physicians and other healthcare providers make critical decisions in the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring, or treatment of illnesses and diseases.

 

Take the next step and start exploring programs

Becoming a medical lab professional gives you the opportunity to join the exciting and ever-expanding field of healthcare — while also working behind the scenes without extensive patient interaction.

If that sounds appealing to you, I strongly suggest you take the next step and begin researching medical lab programs.

 


Jessica Hoernemann, MS, MLS(ASCP), is an assistant professor and the program chair for the Medical Laboratory Technology and Medical Laboratory Science programs at Northwestern Health Sciences University.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

7 Potential Benefits And Risks Of Artificial Intelligence In Healthcare

Over the next few years, artificial intelligence (AI) will gradually become more integral to the medical sector. While the healthcare industry is no stranger to ground-breaking and potentially lifesaving advancements in technology, AI-based technologies offer an impressive array of applications. From automating the most trivial tasks to detecting errors, the benefits of artificial intelligence in the healthcare industry have been undeniable. Unfortunately, these benefits come with potential risks.

The Benefits Of AI In The Medical Sector
Despite being in its infancy, the advantages of AI-based technologies in the healthcare industry are already impressive. Numerous clinical settings and healthcare practitioners are already taking advantage of AI systems to enhance patient care.


Improve Patient Diagnosis And Treatment

The ability to improve patient diagnosis and care is arguably the biggest allure of artificial intelligence in the medical sector. Thanks to artificial intelligence, many physicians are diagnosing patients with greater accuracy at a faster rate.

Due to the capabilities of neural networks and machine learning, AI can analyze an immense amount of data and research findings instantaneously. Medical professionals can then use these findings to provide a more accurate diagnosis and more effective treatment. Moreover, AI-based medical systems are able to detect some illnesses early. Early detection allows for earlier treatment, which can be potentially lifesaving.

Greater Efficiency For Medical Settings
With the support of artificial intelligence, healthcare practitioners can practice medicine more efficiently.

For example, AI medical pre-screening is capable of answering common questions from patients and address any nonemergent issues. “Artificial intelligence not only saves the patient from an unnecessary and costly session with a physician, but it enables healthcare professionals to focus on patients in urgent need of care,” explains James Conway, a business blogger at Write my X and 1 Day 2 write. “AI could essentially optimize healthcare.”

The numerous applications of AI-based systems can drastically reduce the work burden on healthcare professionals and allow them to provide higher quality patient care to those in need.

Reduce The Cost Of Healthcare
Due to machine learning’s ability to access and analyze data on a patient’s detailed medical history, healthcare professionals are better equipped to identify patients at risk of a potential illness. In addition to possibly saving that patient’s life, AI could save them from expensive procedures, medicine, and other treatments. Several clinical settings are already employing AI to prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.

The Risks Of AI In The Healthcare Industry
While AI offers many advantages for practitioners and patients alike, there are some potential dangers to relying on this technology.

Regulation And Liability
As more healthcare professionals turn to AI to support them with patient care, liability becomes blurry. “In the event of an incorrect diagnosis or treatment suggested by AI, there’s the question of whether the physician or AI developer should be held more responsible,” warns Ida Hall, a technical writer at Origin Writings and Brit Student.

It’s imperative that medical practitioners avoid becoming overly reliant on AI-based technologies. Their medical training and knowledge must be the ultimate judge regardless of AI’s recommendations.

Patient-Physician Relationship
Although patients typically trust their doctors and other healthcare professionals to have their safety and best interest at heart, some are more reluctant to trust artificial intelligence. As a result, the introduction of AI to patient-facing systems could be harmful for the patient-physician relationship. Patients may be more mistrustful of a diagnosis from an AI and clinical practitioners who employ AI to help with their care.

Data Protection
A patient’s medical history is an incredibly sensitive matter. Since AI enjoys unrestricted access to vast amounts of medical data, concerns about patient privacy must be addressed. Medical AI developers must be regulated to ensure the collection and sharing of patient data is as ethical and confidential as possible.

Job Security
Though AI currently fulfills a supporting role to human healthcare professionals, the technology is still in its early stages. Some medical practitioners, such as radiologists, have raised concerns over the future of their career.

Conclusion
As the medical industry begins to embrace the various applications of AI, the potential for better and faster patient care will revolutionize healthcare. As long as healthcare practitioners and medical AI developers handle this technology with the utmost care, artificial intelligence can continue to play a beneficial role in medicine.


George J. Newton is a tech content specialist at Write my essay and PhD kingdom. He has been married for ten years, perfecting the art of the apology throughout. He writes articles on the latest news and innovations in tech for Next Coursework.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Want to Work in Healthcare? Medical Assistants Are Always Needed

Want to Work in Healthcare? Medical Assistants Are Always Needed

Working in healthcare is a rewarding career choice. There are many different options for you to choose from, including medical assistants. Medical assistants help doctors and nurses with administrative tasks, so they are able to spend more time with their patients. They also have the opportunity to learn about new treatments and procedures that could be beneficial to them or someone they know in the future. However, if you’re thinking about becoming a medical assistant, it’s important to remember these four tips.

Get Your Degree
Medical assistants usually need to have an associate degree or certification for employers to hire them. There are several different types of degrees you can get, including one that focuses on medical billing and coding, which is very helpful if you want to work in healthcare but don’t necessarily like the idea of working with patients directly.
There are many medical assistant programs that you can get a certification through, all of which will allow you to further your career more quickly than if you were on your own. This will help those who are just starting out gain more experience in their field and have better job opportunities available to them down the road.

Be Willing to Take on Responsibilities
Some medical assistants begin their careers as receptionists or office managers until they have enough experience with patients. Others take a fast track and get a degree in the field. Either way will help them build confidence and learn more about how a medical office or hospital clinic works before they spend time working directly with patients who need care. There’s no shame in starting out slowly, especially if it means you will be able to work your way up in the long term.
It’s also important for medical assistants to stay up to date on new technologies and healthcare laws so that they can provide patients with quality care where they are able. Medical assistants who keep their skills fresh are more likely to get promoted than those who don’t show any interest in learning about the field.

Find the Right Work Environment
Some medical assistants prefer to work in a hospital, while others would rather spend their days working for a private clinic. It’s important that you find an environment where you feel comfortable and enjoy spending your day. The right environment could influence how much free time you have outside of work and who they will meet, and the types of people they work with.
Medical assistants are sought after across the country. With a degree and a little looking it will be very easy to find work to be able to cover your bills, but more importantly, be able to help people across the nation, and get your foot in the door in a great career field.


Article by Rachelle Wilber

Bio: Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber; https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009221637700

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

5 Tech Devices that are Changing Healthcare

Health tech refers basically to all vaccines, devices, medicines, systems, and procedures intended to modernize the operation in Healthcare, improve and lower the cost of health care. The future of Healthcare will be greatly affected by emerging technology.

Health tech refers basically to all vaccines, devices, medicines, systems, and procedures intended to modernize the operation in Healthcare, improve and lower the cost of health care. The future of Healthcare will be greatly affected by emerging technology. It is, therefore, important you familiarize yourself with the tech devices in health care so that you may be able to control and operate them. The following tech devices are changing Healthcare greatly, and you should be aware of them.

1. Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor

This device can be used for professional or personal use. It saves you the hustle of having to visit the hospital now and then to keep track of your blood pressure. To operate, this gadget has a wireless device plus an armband that helps you connect it to your mobile or any other electronic device via Bluetooth. After connecting it, it configures your blood pressure, sends the data to your mobile, processes it, and finally, the information is displayed on your phone. If you follow the procedure keenly, the device is very easy to operate. After receiving the displayed data, you can consult your doctor or take your medication according to the doctor’s prescription.

2. Muse

Muse is an EEG solutions gadget that can monitor the activities of your brain. The Muse is mostly used in the neuroscience field to translate the waves in the brain. Muse interprets your mental actions through the use of advanced processing signals. When your mind is at rest, translate the waves into weather sounds. However, when your mind is drifting, the waves are translated into stormy weather and suggest tips on calming your brain by controlling your breath.

Moreover, it updates you on your stress level and gives suggestions on dealing with the stress. This gadget also can connect to your phone via Bluetooth. After connecting to the Bluetooth, you can start the Meditation App on Muse, plug in your earphones and enjoy the meditation with your eyes closed. Once the session is over, you can track your progress by reviewing your results.

3. Glucose Monitor

You can conduct s diabetes test on your own from the comfort of wherever you might be by using a glucose monitor. You do not need any doctor’s prescription to purchase this device, and it can be bought over the counter. Any local pharmacy around your residence can sell you diabetes test supplies such as lancets, glucose meters, and test strips. Through this device, you can monitor your glucose levels since it automatically tracks your blood sugar levels at any time of the day. The device operates with the help of a mobile app that connects to it via Bluetooth. Before purchasing this gadget, you need to know how it works and the variety of options available in the market. You can navigate this page to find the techniques that can help you choose the best glucose monitor.

4. DNA Monitor

Small clinics might experience difficulties in purchasing machines for testing DNA. When powered by a mobile app, this device turns into a DNA-based disease detection device that is very powerful. It utilizes Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) to operate. The device is flexible in that it can be compatible with either iPhone or Android gadgets.

5. Asthma Monitor

This gadget is perfect for individuals who have asthma as well as health care practitioners handling asthmatic patients. When you breathe in and out, this device records the pattern of whizzing air, and you’re breathing. An asthma monitor analyzes the patterns in your breathing and configures your asthma condition. It makes it easy to manage the state of an asthma patient by monitoring their existing condition. To configure the results, a patient must place this gadget close to their nose and inhale and exhale normally. The device collects the breathing data and sends the information to the connected mobile. This data is then processed per the criteria and settings of the mobile app and provides the results.

These are but a few of the available tech devices that are transforming Healthcare. Digital Healthcare Tech will continue to boom, and new gadgets will be discovered. It is upon you to get updated with these changes to enjoy the ease and benefits of this technology.


Article by Maggie Bloom

Author Bio: Maggie graduated from Utah Valley University with a degree in communication and writing. In her spare time, she loves to dance, read, and bake. She also enjoys traveling and scouting out new brunch locations.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

5 Tips For Passing Your CPC Exam

If you are a medical coder who wants to rise to the top of your profession and earn possibly as much as 20% more than coders who are non-certified, you will want to take and pass the Certified Professional Coder (CPC) Exam.

If you are a medical coder who wants to rise to the top of your profession and earn possibly as much as 20% more than coders who are non-certified, you will want to take and pass the Certified Professional Coder (CPC) Exam. Considered the gold standard by healthcare employers, passing this exam is critical for your continued career success. However, while you may be feeling stressed out about your upcoming exam, there are things you can do to increase your chances of passing on the first try. To do so, follow these five tips.

Stick to Your Routine

First of all, you want to make sure you feel as good as possible on exam day. You can do this by sticking to your routine of getting a good night’s sleep, getting up early enough so that you don’t have to rush through things, and eating a good breakfast. After all, staying awake most of the night worrying about the exam won’t do any good.

Remember it’s an Open-Book Exam

While the CPC exam is open-book, this doesn’t mean it’s easy to pass. Though this means you won’t have to memorize everything, it does mean you’ll need to know how to get the answers you need very quickly, since the exam is timed. Oftentimes, courses that you take before going into the exam will have recommendations for how to navigate through the textbook. Online resources such as Coding Clarified, also have resources to help you through the exam and come out with a passing grade.

Take Some Practice CPC Exams

To give you a good feel for the exam, take several practice CPC exams before it’s time to take the one that really counts. By doing so, you’ll have a general idea of the types of questions you’ll be asked, how long it will take you to finish, and let you know which areas you may need to brush up on before exam day.

Buy a Study Guide

During the course of your studies leading up to the exam, it’s always a good idea to purchase a CPC-specific study guide. Since these guides are known for highlighting key areas you should focus on for the exam, buying one can put you on the right track as to which areas of the exam you may need to focus on the most.

Trust Yourself

Last but not least, trust in yourself as you prepare to take the CPC exam. Since you did well in your classes and have the necessary knowledge and skills, chances are that by preparing ahead of time, you’ll do just fine.

By sticking to these five tips, you’ll soon find yourself passing the CPC Exam and being a Certified Professional Coder.


Article by Ani O.
Freelance writer and web enthusiast

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

A Profession with a Bright Future: 5 Advantages to Being a Clinical Massage Therapist

Clinical massage therapists are becoming increasingly important in healthcare. Learn why this profession could be a great career option.

The demand for massage therapists is high and a big part of that has to do with the profession’s growing role in healthcare. Clinical massage therapists use massage techniques to help heal injuries, alleviate pain, and improve muscle function.

I’ve experienced the exciting transformation of the massage therapy profession firsthand, both as a practicing massage therapist and as a massage therapy instructor and program director.

Below, I’ll describe five advantages to being a clinical massage therapist.

1. Become a healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re interested in a healthcare career but are concerned about the time and expense it can take, massage therapy could be a great option for you.

Depending on the program you choose, it’s possible for you to obtain a certificate in therapeutic massage in a year or so. This can prepare you to work in healthcare settings such as hospitals, chiropractic offices, and integrative healthcare clinics, as well as your own massage therapy practice.

And with approximately another three to eight months of education, you can obtain an associate degree. This can open up additional opportunities for further education and professional advancement. (For more info, check out how to become a massage therapist.)

2. Choose a profession with a bright future

Although there are no guarantees when it comes to obtaining employment, you should know the current — and expected — demand for massage therapists is extremely high.

In fact, in my 18 years of experience, I can’t recall a more promising time to enter the massage therapy job market.

A great indicator of this is the Bureau of Labor Statistics job outlook from 2020 to 2030, which projects a 32% job growth rate. To help put that in perspective, that’s nearly four times the average growth rate for all jobs.

3. Enjoy a low-stress career helping improve people’s health

Clinical massage therapists do more than help people feel more relaxed. They can play a pivotal role in relieving certain types of pain, helping people rehabilitate from injuries and surgeries, and optimizing muscle functioning.

Having a career helping improve people’s health in ways like these can be incredibly rewarding.
Also, keep in mind that some healthcare settings can be hectic and stressful. But the good news here is that clinical massage therapists typically work in low-stress settings.

They also can enjoy the satisfaction of establishing a deeper connection with patients. Rather than move patients quickly through appointments, clinical massage therapists provide direct care through touch, sometimes for an hour or more.

4. Have the freedom to create your own career path

Compared to many other healthcare professions, clinical massage therapists have more freedom to create their own career path.

For example, opening your own massage therapy practice is a viable — and popular — option for massage therapists, which makes it easier to shape your own schedule.

But if having your own massage practice isn’t for you, that’s not a problem. Clinical massage therapists can find employment in a wide range of settings. Here are some examples:

Integrative care clinics
Chiropractic offices
Community clinics
Primary care clinics
Sports and rehabilitation clinics
Public and private hospitals
VA medical centers
Fitness centers
Sports team facilities

Clinical massage therapists can also specialize in working with specific types of patients. Veterans, children, seniors, athletes, expectant mothers, cancer patients, hospice patients — these are just some of the many possibilities.

5. Be on the front lines of exciting changes in healthcare

As a clinical massage therapist, you can become part of an exciting new era in healthcare. I’m talking specifically about integrative healthcare, a patient-centered, team-based approach involving practitioners from various fields working together to help patients.

Increasingly, clinical massage therapists are part of a healthcare team — in some cases working alongside — healthcare professionals like chiropractors, acupuncturists, physical therapists, medical doctors, nurses, and more.

In the process, clinical massage therapists are also helping to meet the growing demand for drug-free, noninvasive alternatives to pain medications such as opioids.

Take the next step and start exploring programs

You’ve just gotten a glimpse of a growing healthcare profession in high demand, one where you can become a professional in a shorter amount of time, shape your own career more easily, and enjoy a low-stress environment helping others become healthier.

Could becoming a clinical massage therapist be right for you? To learn more, start researching massage therapy programs today.


Spring Saldana is board-certified in therapeutic massage and bodywork, the highest credential within the massage and bodywork profession. She is also the Program Chair of the Massage Therapy Programs at Northwestern Health Sciences University.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Social Media Do’s and Don’ts for Medical Professionals

As COVID has prevented people from safely interacting in person, more have turned to social media. As a medical professional, here’s how to behave (or not) online.

Over the last year and a half, as COVID-19 has prevented scores of people from safely interacting in person with their family, friends, coworkers, and more, people have turned to social media in droves, not only to foster a connection, but oftentimes for medical information. So, what are the ins and outs of using social media as a medical professional? We break it down below.

Do

Counter Misinformation

It’s no secret that the internet—particularly, social media—is a place where unchecked information masquerading as fact is allowed to mostly run rampant. From anti-vaxxers to pseudoscience loyalists, social media is full of people who make your job more difficult every single day, by spreading falsehoods and, in the worst cases, putting lives at risk with their irresponsible and uninformed claims. And while it may be tempting to go on a CAPS LOCK heavy or profanity laden rant when you see this happening, it would be better to counter by debunking myths and discrediting claims using your knowledge of medical science—and, maybe, have a few medical journals at the ready for citing. Use social media to be an authoritative voice for facts online and a source of knowledge for the public.

Raise Awareness

While giving blanket medical advice on the internet is never a great idea, you can use your specialized knowledge to raise awareness about medical issues or conditions, in addition to the aforementioned debunking of misinformation. Consider this a preemptive strike against falsehoods, if you will. If you work in cardiology, for instance, you can take to social media to discuss heart-healthy nutrition, or the benefits of cardiovascular exercise. In ENT? Discuss fall risks, the dangers of undiagnosed sleep apnea, or maybe share your local allergen information on a weekly basis. As a bonus, if you share online with any regularity, it can begin to build a brand for yourself or your practice as experts in your specialty, while also raising awareness in the general population and driving locals to your practice.

Connect with Patients

Nearly 90% of older adults have used social media to seek and share health information, and 40% of young adults have turned to online tools to connect with others over their health challenges. Your patients are no exception. Engage with them on social media, where they already are, to not only augment clinical care, but to help educate, as well as provide support.

Don’t

Expose Patient Information

Obviously, by working in healthcare, you are intimately familiar with industry rules and regulations regarding patient privacy. This applies just as much, if not more so, online. It should go without saying, but we’re going to say it anyway: never, ever, ever, ever, ever disclose protected health information online in any capacity. Ever. And definitely do not share pictures or videos of patients online, unless a patient has given their consent in writing. For one, it’s a HIPAA violation, and it also isn’t doing you any favors in looking like a professional people can trust.

Patient Shame

Not too long ago, news broke of a hospital in Maine coming under fire after a “wall of shame”, aimed at mocking and humiliating disabled patients, was discovered and exposed by one of their own employees. Don’t do that. Or anything like that. In real life or online. Do not shame your patients for getting vaccinated, or even for not getting vaccinated. Do not fat shame your patients. Do not shame your patients for their level of wealth or poverty. Do not shame them for their disabilities. Do not shame your patients. Patients are entrusting you with their medical care, and in some cases, their lives, and it is your responsibility, no matter how trying they may be, or how exhausted you are, to be a consummate professional and not slander them in any way.

Bash Your Employer

Nothing online is 100% private. Anything you post online, even on a private Facebook or Twitter page, can be screen captured by someone with less than honorable intentions and it can get back to your employer. Be careful what you say online, as it can make all the difference between gainful employment and an unexpected job search—or even a lawsuit.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where Healthcare Support Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Working in healthcare has always garnered a lot of respect, especially over the last year. But is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Working in healthcare can garner a lot of respect, as we’ve certainly seen over the last year with many in the industry being hailed as heroes for working on the frontlines of the pandemic.

However, is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Below are the ten states offering the highest and the lowest average salaries for ten popular healthcare support professions, listed alphabetically, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $108,400
  2. Hawaii – $101,570
  3. Alaska – $95,990
  4. District of Columbia – $94,260
  5. Rhode Island – $92,460
  6. Washington – $92,150
  7. Oregon – $91,550
  8. Massachusetts – $89,080
  9. Wisconsin – $86,810
  10. Colorado – $86,370

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $57,870
  2. Georgia – $61,100
  3. Mississippi – $62,600
  4. West Virginia – $62,920
  5. Louisiana – $63,520
  6. Arkansas – $64,670
  7. South Dakota – $64,840
  8. Tennessee – $65,750
  9. Michigan – $66,020
  10. Kentucky – $67,520

EMTs & Paramedics – Highest Paying States

  1. Hawaii – $58,580
  2. Washington – $56,910
  3. Maryland – $53,440
  4. Alaska – $50,030
  5. California – $48,280
  6. Illinois – $48,040
  7. District of Columbia – $47,460
  8. New York – $46,920
  9. Massachusetts – $46,110
  10. Connecticut – $45,800

EMTs & Paramedics – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $30,520
  2. Alabama – $30,770
  3. Kansas – $31,500
  4. Kentucky – $32,030
  5. Mississippi – $32,250
  6. South Dakota – $33,110
  7. Montana – $34,090
  8. Michigan – $34,410
  9. Arkansas – $34,630
  10. Ohio – $34,680

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $35,360
  2. North Dakota – $34,020
  3. Massachusetts – $33,890
  4. Vermont – $33,810
  5. Washington – $32,860
  6. New York – $32,140
  7. District of Columbia – $31,810
  8. California – $31,270
  9. Rhode Island – $30,790
  10. Oregon – $30,730

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $19,800
  2. Alabama – $20,960
  3. Mississippi – $21,520
  4. West Virginia – $21,730
  5. Texas – $21,750
  6. Oklahoma – $22,320
  7. North Carolina – $22,920
  8. Tennessee – $23,130
  9. Virginia – $23,360
  10. Arkansas – $23,510

Medical Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $46,610
  2. Washington – $45,700
  3. District of Columbia – $45,340
  4. Massachusetts – $43,090
  5. Minnesota – $43,090
  6. California – $42,990
  7. Oregon – $41,700
  8. Connecticut – $41,070
  9. Hawaii – $40,530
  10. New York – $39,850

Medical Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $29,820
  2. Alabama – $29,950
  3. Mississippi – $30,550
  4. Louisiana – $31,110
  5. Arkansas – $31,530
  6. Oklahoma – $31,790
  7. South Dakota – $31,910
  8. Kansas – $32,030
  9. New Mexico – $32,340
  10. South Carolina – $33,010

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. District of Columbia – $47,110
  2. California – $46,140
  3. Washington – $45,990
  4. Massachusetts – $44,900
  5. Rhode Island – $43,740
  6. Hawaii – $43,620
  7. New Jersey – $43,130
  8. Minnesota – $42,730
  9. Oregon – $42,550
  10. New York – $42,170

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Mississippi – $30,980
  2. Louisiana – $32,680
  3. West Virginia – $32,940
  4. Tennessee – $33,460
  5. Montana – $33,550
  6. New Mexico – $33,710
  7. Kentucky – $34,080
  8. Oklahoma – $34,200
  9. Wyoming – $35,110
  10. Florida – $35,150

Nursing Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $42,500
  2. New York – $40,620
  3. California – $39,280
  4. Hawaii – $38,650
  5. Massachusetts – $37,160
  6. Oregon – $37,100
  7. District of Columbia – $36,980
  8. Washington – $36,310
  9. Minnesota – $36,040
  10. North Dakota – $35,510

Nursing Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $24,300
  2. Mississippi – $24,400
  3. Alabama – $25,600
  4. Arkansas – $26,550
  5. Oklahoma – $27,220
  6. Missouri – $27,720
  7. South Carolina – $27,760
  8. North Carolina – $27,800
  9. Tennessee – $27,940
  10. Kentucky – $27,980

Pharmacy Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,620
  2. Alaska – $46,430
  3. Washington – $46,400
  4. District of Columbia – $46,240
  5. Oregon – $43,410
  6. Hawaii – $42,300
  7. North Dakota – $41,390
  8. Minnesota – $39,770
  9. Nevada – $39,390
  10. Wyoming – $39,330

Pharmacy Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Kentucky – $30,370
  2. Alabama – $30,980
  3. Arkansas – $31,010
  4. Pennsylvania – $31,760
  5. West Virginia – $31,890
  6. Georgia – $32,160
  7. Ohio – $32,520
  8. Oklahoma – $32,900
  9. North Carolina – $33,300
  10. Missouri – $33,670

Phlebotomists – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,230
  2. New York – $44,630
  3. District of Columbia – $43,960
  4. Alaska – $43,270
  5. Washington – $42,530
  6. Massachusetts – $42,030
  7. Connecticut – $41,170
  8. Oregon – $40,560
  9. Delaware – $40,520
  10. Maryland – $40,300

Phlebotomists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $29,050
  2. Louisiana – $30,600
  3. Arkansas – $31,120
  4. Oklahoma – $31,400
  5. Mississippi – $31,640
  6. Missouri – $31,830
  7. Kentucky – $32,190
  8. Tennessee – $32,210
  9. Maine – $32,380
  10. Iowa – $32,430

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $95,010
  2. Hawaii – $82,990
  3. District of Columbia – $82,270
  4. Alaska – $79,330
  5. Massachusetts – $78,830
  6. Washington – $77,310
  7. Oregon – $76,520
  8. Rhode Island – $74,670
  9. New York – $73,150
  10. Connecticut – $72,470

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $47,300
  2. Mississippi – $48,100
  3. Arkansas – $52,290
  4. Tennessee – $53,030
  5. Kentucky – $53,090
  6. Iowa – $53,400
  7. Louisiana – $53,610
  8. West Virginia – $53,690
  9. South Dakota – $54,610
  10. Kansas – $55,770

Surgical Technologists – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $67,120
  2. Nevada – $67,000
  3. California – $64,570
  4. Connecticut – $62,310
  5. District of Columbia – $61,620
  6. Minnesota – $61,300
  7. Washington – $60,450
  8. Oregon – $59,480
  9. Rhode Island – $59,410
  10. New York – $59,380

Surgical Technologists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $38,660
  2. West Virginia – $39,890
  3. Mississippi – $41,520
  4. Louisiana – $42,140
  5. Arkansas – $42,390
  6. Iowa – $43,780
  7. South Carolina – $43,880
  8. Kentucky – $44,180
  9. Tennessee – $44,540
  10. South Dakota – $44,700

Ready to start your search for a higher paying healthcare job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare’s 5 Most In-Demand Roles, Specialties, & Locations

Unemployment in healthcare is now only 3.1% and the industry has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months. What healthcare professionals are needed the most, and where?

In April of 2020, as COVID-19 spread rapidly through our country, the unemployment rate reached 14.8%—the highest rate observed since data collection began in 1948.

Despite being, arguably, the most needed professionals in the country during an unprecedented health emergency, the healthcare industry accounted for 6.8% of jobs lost during that time, with employment in the field declining by 1.4 million.

Over a year later, though, one could say healthcare is booming, yet again. Despite the overall unemployment rate currently sitting at 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare is now only 3.1%. The industry has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when the industry added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of healthcare professionals are needed the most? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

5 Most In-Demand Position Types:

  1. Registered Nurse
  2. Technologist/Technician
  3. Certified Nursing Assistant
  4. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
  5. Physician

5 Most In-Demand Specialties:

  1. Insurance
  2. Education
  3. Patient Care
  4. Customer Service
  5. Rehabilitation

5 Most In-Demand Locations:

  1. California
  2. Texas
  3. New York
  4. Georgia
  5. Pennsylvania

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.