The Great Resignation Isn’t Sparing Healthcare

We have been hearing about the Great Resignation for about a year now. Just in case you’ve been living under a rock, the Great Resignation is a phenomenon that has seen millions of people leave their jobs since the start of the COVID pandemic. Some are leaving to find employment elsewhere within the same industry. Others are retiring early. Still others are looking for a complete change, looking for work in an entirely different field or starting a new business.

Unfortunately for healthcare, the Great Resignation isn’t sparing it. Just look at nurse practitioner jobs. They are as plentiful now as they have ever been. The same goes for nursing jobs, physician jobs, therapist jobs, and on and on. It is not clear where all the disaffected workers are going, but it is clear that healthcare facilities are now having to work harder than they ever have in the past to fill open positions.

Looking for Something New

It is not surprising that job boards would have a lot more open doctor, nurse, and nurse practitioner jobs since the start of the pandemic. Healthcare delivery was obviously at the forefront of the pandemic. It still is. A lot of healthcare professionals just had their fill in the troubled year that was 2020. Many have decided it is time for a change.

Out in Idaho, the Idaho Press recently published an article about a group of healthcare professionals who had gotten together to discuss life after healthcare. Some of them were in the position of transitioning to new careers while others had already made the switch. The group represented everyone from nurse practitioners to therapists.

It is interesting that these professionals wanted to share their stories, not to encourage other healthcare workers to abandoned ship, but to let them know that other things were out there should they decide to try something new. That’s really what all of this is about. Whether it is healthcare or some other industry, the Great Resignation is about switching gears.

Those Who Stay Behind

Virtually every industry is reeling from the fallout of the Great Resignation. Those who stay behind have their own choices to make. Do they stay, or do they go? In healthcare, employers are doing everything they can to make sure their people stay. They have every reason to do so.

It goes without saying that healthcare workers are in the driver’s seat right now. They have a lot of leverage to ask for changes. Healthcare facilities have little choice but to comply with every reasonable request. Otherwise, they stand to continue losing workers to the Great Resignation.

From nurse practitioner jobs to allied health jobs, things in healthcare are changing rapidly. That is one of the things the group in Idaho mentioned. Many of the healthcare professionals who have decided to move on say that the modern work environment is nothing like what they knew when they first got started. Again, this is understandable. Nothing remains unchanged forever.

The Opportunities Are There

Even as the Great Resignation continues, opportunities for employment abound. If you are looking for nurse practitioner jobs, you will find plenty here on our job board. The same goes for therapist jobs, physician jobs, etc. Take the time to look around and maybe post your resume. There are employers out there very much interested in speaking with you.

In the meantime, the healthcare sector will have to continue changing in order to adapt to the modern workforce. The old ways of doing things are not going to work any longer. The faster healthcare adapts, the faster it will right the employment ship and start moving forward again.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

That Moment You Realize the Doctor Is a Wannabe Rock Star

Search as many physician jobs as you want on our job board, and we’re betting you won’t find any that require musical skills. Musical ability has nothing to do with providing quality medical care. But that has not stopped a group of physicians in suburban Chicago from not only learning to play, but also using their musical talents to thank nurses and support staff.

 Imagine that moment the staff realized some of their doctors were wannabe rock stars. Imagine seeing a doctor you work closely with, day after day, doing his best Jimmy Buffet impression – just to make you smile. What recently happened at Central DuPage Hospital undoubtedly made a lot of people happy. The healthcare industry needs more of it.

 Plenty of Bad News

 We do not have to look far to find bad news in healthcare. There is plenty of it. From physician burnout to nurses leaving clinical work in droves, we could spend all day focusing on the problems. Those problems do need some attention, but they shouldn’t command all of our attention. There is more than enough good to focus on.

 Some of that good was tapped into by Northwestern Medicine’s Dr. Anthony F. Altimari, M.D. According to the Daily Harald, Altimari’s love of music goes beyond just the music itself. He finds it therapeutic. When the stresses of his profession start getting to him, he picks up his guitar and goes to town.

Altimari is apparently not alone. He has made it his mission to encourage colleagues at Central DuPage to do the same thing. Many of them have. So much so that a bunch of them got together and put on a concert for hospital staff. The concert was a way for them to show their appreciation for how hard nurses and support staff worked during the COVID pandemic.

 Doctors Are People Too

 Physician jobs are a dime a dozen. That being the case, it is easy for the rest of us to forget that doctors are people too. They have families to take care of. They have bills to pay, houses to maintain, and cars that need to go into the shop for work. They also have their dreams and ambitions outside of medicine.

 Some of the nursing staff at Central DuPage were probably shocked to discover that the doctors they work with are also wannabe rock stars. But why should that be so unusual? Music is universal. People love it wherever you go. Furthermore, far more people possess musical talent than actually use it to benefit others.

 Your surgeon may have the steadiest hands in the business. And if so, you probably appreciate that. But perhaps those same hands are capable of performing guitar licks that would rival anything Jimmy Hendrix produced. Then again, maybe your highly skilled surgeon couldn’t carry a note in a bucket. You just don’t know.

 The Good Side of Medicine

 If nothing else, nurses and support staff at Central DuPage recently got a break from their stressful jobs. They got to enjoy the good side of medicine brought to them by a group of rocker doctors who just happen to be very good on their instruments. What a sight that must have been for the staff.

 Are you currently on the hunt for good physician jobs? If so, remember that there is more to life than work. Do whatever job you eventually land to the best of your ability. But do not hesitate to pursue other interests as well. You might be able to use those interests to do something good for others.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Why the Search for the Perfect Physician Job Might Come up Empty

The world loves superlatives. Most of us think nothing of categorizing something as the ‘best’. And in fact, the introduction of digital marketing in the internet era has caused us to take superlatives to unprecedented levels. We even do it in the healthcare sector, particularly when it comes to discussing the ‘perfect job’.

How many of us have searched for the perfect physician job among the thousands that seem to always be listed? How many of us really believe the perfect job exists? It may or may not. The one thing we can say for sure is that the search for the perfect physician job sometimes comes up empty. But that is true for any career.

Physicians might be at a slight disadvantage here due to the high honor we attach to the profession. We assume that because becoming a physician requires so much time and effort, physician jobs are somehow superior to other career choices. And with that thinking comes the inevitable letdown when a doctor fails to find the perfect job promised in medical school.

3 Main Job Criteria

Your average job seeker searches for jobs based on their particular criteria. That criteria could be anything. But by and large, there are three things that dominate most job searches:

  • Salary
  • Location
  • Description

If you are like most people, your search for physician jobs is dominated by salary requirements. In other words, you look for the jobs that pay the most. You may be the kind of person who wants to work in a particular geographic location, so that might be just as important to you as salary. But what about job description?

Job seekers tend to look at descriptions to see if they qualify. Some go so far as to try to understand what a particular job entails by paying close attention to minute description details. But let’s be honest. When push comes to shove, job description takes a distant third place to salary and location.

Scoring the Trifecta

To use a horse betting analogy, finding a physician job that met all your requirements for salary, location, and job description would be like hitting the trifecta. Is it possible? Absolutely. Is it likely? Perhaps.

Conventional wisdom says that you can probably count on getting two of the three but getting all three is not likely. Does that mean you should not try for the trifecta? Absolutely not. You definitely will not get all three if you do not try. If you do try, you may or may not succeed.

This all boils down to the idea of pragmatism. One’s search for healthcare jobs can be supported by plenty of optimism and high hopes for the future. But it can also be tempered with the pragmatic reality that perfection is hard to come by. When one accepts the fact that the perfect job may either not exist or not be found on the first try, finding a job becomes easier.

Perfect Is a Matter of Perspective

Taking a pragmatic approach to physicians jobs does not automatically mean settling for whatever you can get. Rather, a better way to look at it is to acknowledge that perfection is a matter of perspective. A physician job that pays well, allows a good work-life balance, and gives you an opportunity to grow professionally may be exactly what you need. It may not be what you dreamed of, but so what?

Like any other job category, physician jobs are abundant. Whether or not you will find the perfect job remains to be seen.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Greatest Difficulties that Can Arise When Studying Medicine Abroad

Much like any other profession, you can master medical specializations while studying abroad. And people do it despite the difficulties of getting into such programs. In the US, for example, 3% of medical students come from other countries.

 

However, studying medicine abroad is as difficult as finding a program that will fit you in. International students can face many challenges, which are not easy to overcome.

 

What challenges?

 

Take a look.

1.   Language Barrier

Studying medicine doesn’t only mean being good at biology, chemistry, physics, and math. It is also about your ability to operate very specific terminology. And, if your knowledge of the language of the country where you’re going to is shaky, consider improving it first.

 

The reason is simple – you won’t have enough time to learn the language when your classes start. You will spend so much time studying for lectures and seminars that you will hardly have time to sleep. But such is the life of a medical student.

 

So, before you make any plans to study abroad, make sure you master the language. The best way to do it is to get yourself a native speaker. It’s not that expensive – for example, on Preply, you can find Portuguese tutors for as low as $5 an hour:

 

Why should you go for a native speaker?

 

You need someone who doesn’t just know the language and culture very well, but who also understands the medical and educational systems of the country you’re going to. This way, you will have a connection to keep in contact with if you encounter misunderstandings.

2.   No Shadowing Period

A shadowing period is a time you get at a potential workplace to go around observing doctors, nurses, and other medical staff and gaining valuable knowledge from it. Shadowing is essential in any job that requires a learning curve.

 

Unfortunately, not all medical programs can provide that. For instance, in the 2017 research, surveyed medical students in the UK shared that the lack of a shadowing period was one of the disadvantages of becoming a medical practitioner there.

 

So, before you apply for a program, do your research. Find whether you’ll have access to internships with shadowing periods and other opportunities to apply your knowledge in practice.

3.   Pressure During Exam Weeks

Medical school is stressful. A study that surveyed medical students around the Middle East has revealed most of them experienced severe stress and even considered leaving the studies altogether.

 

Since you will be responsible for saving people’s lives, you can’t take your education carelessly. The exam weeks will be the most challenging – even to get a simple pass, you will have to study tirelessly.

 

The worst part is that you will hardly have any support system. So, if you’re not ready for such stress, reconsider your choice of studying medicine. Or, think about going to a local college or university.

4.   Expensive Courses

Some colleges and universities abroad offer additional courses to students who want to further their education. Such courses aren’t necessary to attend to get a diploma, but they can be really helpful in your future career.

 

For instance, a workshop about AI in healthcare can give you valuable knowledge and advance your career path, especially if you want to be a surgeon. Adding such qualifications to your CV will help you stand out in the job market.

 

That said, such courses can be very expensive. For instance, a course on AI in healthcare services at MIT costs $2,800. So, consider such expenses before enrolling in a medical school and put some money aside to be able to get extra skills and expand your knowledge.

Over to You

These are only a few examples of difficulties a medical student can encounter when studying abroad. Of course, there are other problems, like difficulties to adapt, ethical differences, etc. You need to be mentally and emotionally ready for the lack of moral support as well, as your parents and friends will be far away from you.

 

But no worries, all these challenges are manageable. Every college and university has a department helping international students adjust and get everything they need to keep up with the studies. So, it would be wise to contact this department before you set off to start your studies – they will help you prepare everything you need to start your first semester stress-free.

 

Article written by Ryan Pell

Ryan is a passionate blogger and writer who likes sharing his thoughts. He works as a content editor and internet researcher and likes to travel and explore new countries.

 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

7 Potential Benefits And Risks Of Artificial Intelligence In Healthcare

Over the next few years, artificial intelligence (AI) will gradually become more integral to the medical sector. While the healthcare industry is no stranger to ground-breaking and potentially lifesaving advancements in technology, AI-based technologies offer an impressive array of applications. From automating the most trivial tasks to detecting errors, the benefits of artificial intelligence in the healthcare industry have been undeniable. Unfortunately, these benefits come with potential risks.

The Benefits Of AI In The Medical Sector
Despite being in its infancy, the advantages of AI-based technologies in the healthcare industry are already impressive. Numerous clinical settings and healthcare practitioners are already taking advantage of AI systems to enhance patient care.


Improve Patient Diagnosis And Treatment

The ability to improve patient diagnosis and care is arguably the biggest allure of artificial intelligence in the medical sector. Thanks to artificial intelligence, many physicians are diagnosing patients with greater accuracy at a faster rate.

Due to the capabilities of neural networks and machine learning, AI can analyze an immense amount of data and research findings instantaneously. Medical professionals can then use these findings to provide a more accurate diagnosis and more effective treatment. Moreover, AI-based medical systems are able to detect some illnesses early. Early detection allows for earlier treatment, which can be potentially lifesaving.

Greater Efficiency For Medical Settings
With the support of artificial intelligence, healthcare practitioners can practice medicine more efficiently.

For example, AI medical pre-screening is capable of answering common questions from patients and address any nonemergent issues. “Artificial intelligence not only saves the patient from an unnecessary and costly session with a physician, but it enables healthcare professionals to focus on patients in urgent need of care,” explains James Conway, a business blogger at Write my X and 1 Day 2 write. “AI could essentially optimize healthcare.”

The numerous applications of AI-based systems can drastically reduce the work burden on healthcare professionals and allow them to provide higher quality patient care to those in need.

Reduce The Cost Of Healthcare
Due to machine learning’s ability to access and analyze data on a patient’s detailed medical history, healthcare professionals are better equipped to identify patients at risk of a potential illness. In addition to possibly saving that patient’s life, AI could save them from expensive procedures, medicine, and other treatments. Several clinical settings are already employing AI to prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.

The Risks Of AI In The Healthcare Industry
While AI offers many advantages for practitioners and patients alike, there are some potential dangers to relying on this technology.

Regulation And Liability
As more healthcare professionals turn to AI to support them with patient care, liability becomes blurry. “In the event of an incorrect diagnosis or treatment suggested by AI, there’s the question of whether the physician or AI developer should be held more responsible,” warns Ida Hall, a technical writer at Origin Writings and Brit Student.

It’s imperative that medical practitioners avoid becoming overly reliant on AI-based technologies. Their medical training and knowledge must be the ultimate judge regardless of AI’s recommendations.

Patient-Physician Relationship
Although patients typically trust their doctors and other healthcare professionals to have their safety and best interest at heart, some are more reluctant to trust artificial intelligence. As a result, the introduction of AI to patient-facing systems could be harmful for the patient-physician relationship. Patients may be more mistrustful of a diagnosis from an AI and clinical practitioners who employ AI to help with their care.

Data Protection
A patient’s medical history is an incredibly sensitive matter. Since AI enjoys unrestricted access to vast amounts of medical data, concerns about patient privacy must be addressed. Medical AI developers must be regulated to ensure the collection and sharing of patient data is as ethical and confidential as possible.

Job Security
Though AI currently fulfills a supporting role to human healthcare professionals, the technology is still in its early stages. Some medical practitioners, such as radiologists, have raised concerns over the future of their career.

Conclusion
As the medical industry begins to embrace the various applications of AI, the potential for better and faster patient care will revolutionize healthcare. As long as healthcare practitioners and medical AI developers handle this technology with the utmost care, artificial intelligence can continue to play a beneficial role in medicine.


George J. Newton is a tech content specialist at Write my essay and PhD kingdom. He has been married for ten years, perfecting the art of the apology throughout. He writes articles on the latest news and innovations in tech for Next Coursework.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where Physician Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Physician salaries often reflect the high level of education, skill, and dedication it takes to become a medical doctor, but not for everyone or everywhere.

Some jobs are known for being well-paying, and physicians are usually at the top of that list, both informally and formally, often ranking at the top of any and every “Highest Paying Jobs” list. As arguably one of the most prestigious professions, the pay often reflects the level of education, skill, and dedication it takes to become a medical doctor. However, not for everyone and not everywhere.

Below are the 10 states where physicians make the most and the least, on average, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for family medicine physicians, general internal medicine physicians, pediatricians, surgeons, and other types of physicians.

Family Medicine Physicians – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $264,010
  2. New Hampshire – $255,090
  3. Wisconsin – $254,690
  4. Hawaii – $251,180
  5. Minnesota – $248,630
  6. Washington – $245,360
  7. Indiana – $241,600
  8. Montana – $237,990
  9. Massachusetts – $235,950
  10. Georgia – $232,190

Family Medicine Physicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $173,790
  2. District of Columbia – $174,210
  3. Kentucky – $180,700
  4. Maine – $190,060
  5. Ohio – $190,650
  6. Missouri – $194,120
  7. New Mexico – $194,260
  8. Colorado – $199,190
  9. New York – $200,170
  10. Connecticut – $202,130

General Internal Medicine Physicians – Highest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $286,330
  2. Alaska – $282,730
  3. South Carolina – $282,620
  4. Nevada – $277,340
  5. Wisconsin – $276,400
  6. Wyoming – $273,750
  7. North Carolina – $273,320
  8. New Mexico – $271,210
  9. Indiana – $264,840
  10. Minnesota – $256,340

General Internal Medicine Physicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $151,100
  2. Michigan – $169,870
  3. Tennessee – $170,370
  4. New York – $171,360
  5. Missouri – $180,870
  6. Ohio – $190,140
  7. Massachusetts – $194,720
  8. Rhode Island – $198,290
  9. Texas – $201,560
  10. Nebraska – $203,950

Pediatricians – Highest Paying States

  1. Montana – $268,760
  2. Alaska – $263,390
  3. Utah – $255,900
  4. New Hampshire – $255,170
  5. Wisconsin – $246,020
  6. Rhode Island – $231,910
  7. Nevada – $229,620
  8. Wyoming – $224,170
  9. Iowa – $223,940
  10. Pennsylvania – $223,350

Pediatricians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Nebraska – $131,250
  2. Kansas – $132,850
  3. Louisiana – $152,350
  4. Georgia – $152,980
  5. Florida – $158,270
  6. North Carolina – $159,530
  7. Tennessee – $159,620
  8. Oklahoma – $168,660
  9. Alabama – $169,380
  10. Ohio – $169,380

Surgeons – Highest Paying States

  1. South Carolina – $295,380
  2. Oregon – $293,170
  3. Kentucky – $292,350
  4. South Dakota – $290,730
  5. Maryland – $287,900
  6. Louisiana – $287,840
  7. District of Columbia – $286,160
  8. Rhode Island – $285,920
  9. Arizona – $284,260
  10. Mississippi – $282,660

Surgeons – Lowest Paying States

  1. Tennessee – $200,990
  2. New York – $213,160
  3. Michigan – $220,120
  4. Indiana – $221,850
  5. Arkansas – $227,080
  6. Virginia – $228,310
  7. Georgia – $229,340
  8. Vermont – $229,420
  9. California – $229,430
  10. Montana – $233,880

Other Physicians – Highest Paying States

  1. Maine – $279,700
  2. Montana – $271,560
  3. South Dakota – $269,100
  4. Alaska – $266,200
  5. Wyoming – $263,540
  6. Hawaii – $263,200
  7. Indiana – $260,540
  8. Wisconsin – $258,470
  9. Nevada – $251,840
  10. Georgia – $251,300

Other Physicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Michigan – $178,230
  2. Kansas – $180,960
  3. Mississippi – $184,170
  4. Massachusetts – $187,980
  5. Tennessee – $194,700
  6. North Carolina – $198,750
  7. Pennsylvania – $202,340
  8. New York – $204,290
  9. Oklahoma – $205,440
  10. Oregon – $205,460

Ready to start your search for a higher paying physician job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

New Projections: 37K to 124K Physician Shortage by 2034

A new report projects the U.S. will experience a shortage of between 37,800 and 124,000 physicians by 2034. What’s driving the shortage, other than COVID-19?

The Association of American Medical Colleges now predicts the United States will experience a shortage of 37,800 to 124,000 doctors by 2034, according to their new report, The Complexities of Physician Supply and Demand: Projections From 2019 to 2034.

The report raises further alarm within the industry, which is still grappling with increased workforce shortages due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some of the report’s key findings and projections include:

  • A primary care physician shortage of between 17,800 and 48,000 by 2034.
  • A shortage of non-primary care specialty physicians of between 21,000 and 77,100 by 2034 including:
    • Between 15,800 and 30,200 for Surgical Specialties.
    • Between 3,800 and 13,400 for Medical Specialties.
    • Between 10,300 and 35,600 for the Other Specialties category.
  • Population growth and aging continue to be the primary source of increasing demand from 2019 to 2034, during which the U.S. population is projected to grow by 10.6%, from about 328.2 million to 363.0 million.
  • Aging is also a factor on the provider side, as well, with more than 40% of currently active physicians turning 65 or older within the next decade.

The report also highlights the short- and long-term consequences the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to have on the nation’s physician workforce, including on training, regulation, practice, workforce exits, and many other factors.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted many of the deepest disparities in health and access to health care services and exposed vulnerabilities in the health care system,” said AAMC President and CEO David J. Skorton, MD in a statement released in conjunction with the report. “The pandemic also has underscored the vital role that physicians and other health care providers play in our nation’s health care infrastructure and the need to ensure we have enough physicians to meet America’s needs.”

According to data from our jobs site, California, New York, and Texas are currently seeing the greatest need for physicians.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

These Are the Best Healthcare Jobs in America

Healthcare professionals have received a lot of praise over the last year, often being lauded as heroes. But which healthcare jobs ranked as the best?

Those who work in healthcare have always known how essential their jobs are. The rest of the world learned this in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold and forever changed the way the healthcare profession will be viewed by the general public. Physicians and Registered Nurses, in particular, were heaped with praise, becoming the heroes of our nation and the world.

But which healthcare jobs are best? Not the most celebrated or well-recognized, but the best—best for salary, work-life balance, stress level, the job market, and future growth. U.S. News & World Report released their annual rankings based on these very metrics. The 20 best healthcare jobs according to their findings are listed below.

1. Physician Assistant

Overall Score: 8.3 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.4/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $112,260
Other Rankings: #1 in 100 Best Jobs, #1 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Physician Assistant Jobs →

2. Nurse Practitioner

Overall Score: 8.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 10/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $109,820
Other Rankings: #3 in 100 Best Jobs, #3 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs →

3. Physician

Overall Score: 7.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $206,500
Other Rankings: #5 in 100 Best Jobs, #8 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Physician Jobs →

4. Speech-Language Pathologist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $79,120
Other Rankings: #7 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Speech-Language Pathologist Jobs →

5. Dentist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 9.9/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $155,600
Other Rankings: #7 in Best STEM Jobs, #9 in 100 Best Jobs, #11 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Dentist Jobs →

6. Veterinarian

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $95,460
Other Rankings: #10 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Veterinarian Jobs →

7. Orthodontist

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 8/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #5 in Best Paying Jobs, #8 in Best STEM Jobs, #11 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Orthodontist Jobs →

8. Anesthesiologist

Overall Score: 7.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #1 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in 100 Best Jobs
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9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #3 in Best Paying Jobs, #18 in 100 Best Jobs
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10. Occupational Therapist

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $84,950
Other Rankings: #19 in 100 Best Jobs
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11. Physical Therapist

Overall Score: 6.9 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.5/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $89,440
Other Rankings: #21 in 100 Best Jobs
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12. Psychiatrist

Overall Score: 6.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 6/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #7 in Best Paying Jobs, #27 in 100 Best Jobs
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13. Prosthodontist

Overall Score: 6.7 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #6 in Best Paying Jobs, #35 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Prosthodontist Jobs →

14. Registered Nurse

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.8/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $73,300
Other Rankings: #37 in 100 Best Jobs
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15. Nurse Anesthetist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $174,790
Other Rankings: #10 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in Best STEM Jobs, #39 in 100 Best Jobs
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16. Obstetrician and Gynecologist — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #4 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Obstetrician and Gynecologist Jobs →

16. Surgeon — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #2 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Surgeon Jobs →

18. Chiropractor

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.6/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $70,340
Other Rankings: #44 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Chiropractor Jobs →

19. Podiatrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.9/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $126,240
Other Rankings: #18 in Best Paying Jobs, #46 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Podiatrist Jobs →

20. Optometrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.5/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $115,250
Other Rankings: #22 in Best Paying Jobs, #48 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Optometrist Jobs →

How do you feel about the rankings? Does your job seem like it’s the “best”? The worst? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Get Your Résumé Ready for the New Year

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job—a resolution that landed on a list of the most popular resolutions for 2021—now is the time to get your résumé in prime shape. While hiring was obviously impacted in many ways over the course of 2020, traditionally, hiring ramps big time once the calendar rolls over into January. If you are seeking a change for the year ahead, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

New Year, New Look

The New Year, for many, is often time for a bold change, and your résumé should be no exception. Start out by updating the look and feel of your résumé. Your goal should be to have a résumé that is easy to follow and one that instantly reflects who you are and what you can do. Some quick tips for giving your résumé a makeover include:

  • Start with an easy-to-follow, modern template that has clearly defined sections of information. Some great examples of résumés like these can be found here, here, and here.
  • Identify and use a tagline for yourself. You aren’t just a nurse or a doctor. “NICU RN-BSN, BLS and ACLS Certified” or “Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician” tucked beneath your name at the top of your résumé affords the reader insight into your qualifications before they even really begin to dig into your document.
  • Update your contact information to current standards. Listing your mailing address is less important these days than linking to your online social profiles. Include, at a minimum, a URL for your LinkedIn account, and any other professionally acceptable social accounts you may hold. Also, be sure to include your email address, but only if it’s one that can be taken seriously, and not something like GlitterSparkleButterfly@whatever.com.
  • Throw out the old objective section in favor of a short, professional summary, and stock it with your most impressive qualifications and accomplishments, which you should then expand upon in your experience and education sections.

Take Stock of 2020

Now that your résumé has a new look for the new year, the content will need updating, as well. With 2020 firmly in the rearview, take time to reflect on all that happened over the course of the year. What did you accomplish? What new skills did you learn? Did you gain any new certifications or degrees? Did you receive any special recognition? Did you take on any new responsibilities?

Also, and probably most importantly, take the time to reflect on what you truly want out of 2021 and beyond. If 2020 taught us anything, it is that time is precious. You should spend your time doing what you love, and your résumé should position you to find a job that fits into that—not just a job that you fit into.

Look back on where the previous year has taken you, and then update the appropriate sections of your résumé to reflect any worthwhile highlights. You will also want to trim the fat, so to speak, from previous years, if there is anything listed that is no longer relevant or has become less impressive over time.

Lastly, take note of keywords that are frequently used in the job postings you have been browsing and make sure you include as many of them as possible in the text of your résumé. Doing so will increase your odds of being labeled as a match for the jobs to which you plan to apply.

Get Online

If you are like the bulk of the population, you will likely be applying to jobs online in 2021, be it on our site or elsewhere, making the online version of your résumé just as important as the paper copy you will bring with you when you go in to interview for said jobs. Make sure you upload your updated résumé to our site and any others you may be using to browse for jobs, and also take the time to revamp your LinkedIn profile to match your reworked résumé, and update any other social accounts you plan to disclose to potential employers (or lock down the ones you don’t plan to share via privacy preferences).

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our 5 Most Popular Articles of 2020

In case you missed any of these worthwhile reads the first time around, we’ve compiled a list of our most popular articles of 2020. Read them here.

With the arrival of 2021, we thought it might be a good time to take a look back at our most popular articles from the year that was 2020. Given they all garnered a lot of traffic over the year, there is a chance you might have seen some of these articles before. However, in case you missed any of these very worthwhile posts the first time around, we have put together the list below.

Please note that we are aware these are not all uplifting reads, but a lot of them are certainly important ones, highlighting the long and trying year 2020 was for many. To shy away from how hard this past year was for you, your loved ones, your patients, and the world as a whole would be doing you a disservice. We thank you immensely for your dedication to your profession and to the lives of your patients this year, and we are fervently wishing you much health, happiness, and healing in 2021.

Without further ado, here are our top five most popular articles from 2020.

1. Freebies, Discounts, & Perks for Healthcare’s Heroes


To recognize the heroic efforts of frontline medical staff, companies are offering promotions as a way of giving back. Here’s a giant list of them.
Read More →

2. The Top 10 Pandemic-Proof Healthcare Jobs


Healthcare is often touted as a recession-proof industry. But is it pandemic-proof? Given the number of available jobs, it seems so. See the most in-demand position types here.
Read More →

3. 10 Healthcare Roles Top Riskiest List


In what may come as a surprise to very few, the top ten riskiest jobs in terms of possible COVID-19 exposure are patient-facing roles in healthcare.
Read More →

4. How to Cope When You Hate Your Job


Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.
Read More →

5. Mental Health of Healthcare Workers Has Tanked Amid Pandemic


The COVID-19 pandemic is clearly taking a toll on the mental health of our nation’s healthcare workers, according to the findings of our recent survey.
Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.