15 Holiday Wish List Must-Haves for Physicians

No matter what you find yourself celebrating this December, here are 15 things physicians should add to their holiday wish lists.

No matter what you find yourself celebrating this December—Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Yule, Solstice, or just the end of 2020 in general—here are 15 things physicians should add to their holiday wish lists. Or just snag for themselves, because everyone deserves a treat every now and then—especially after this year. From ultra-practical PPE to a fancy coffee maker to fuel even the most exhausted physician, there is something for everyone on this list.

1. The Gift of Mental Wellness via a TalkSpace Gift Card, $79.00+

2. This Light Blocking Sleep Mask to Help You Recharge, Day or Night, $12.99

3. A UV Light Phone Sanitizer, Because Germs, $119.95

4. Some PPE (Because Can You Really Have Enough PPE?), $79.00

5. This Fancy Doctor Fuel Maker, $199.99

6. And an Insulated Cup to Keep Your Doctor Fuel Piping Hot, $34.99

7. Some Extra Cozy Antimicrobial Scrub Pants

Women’s, $32.98+

Men’s, $37.98+

8. A Pair of Stylish (& Seriously Comfortable) Shoes, $95.00

9. A Trusty Stethoscope, $98.99+

10. This Insanely Useful Thing That Makes Cooking a Breeze, Even after Your Longest Day, $59.98+

11. Some Stress Relief In A Jar, $15.18

12. A Neck/Back/Shoulder/Everywhere Else That Hurts Deep Tissue Massager, $39.99

13. TLC for Your Hands after Washing Them Vigorously All Year Long, $14.99

14. An Efficient (But Effective) Gratitude Journal, $22.90

15. And, Lastly, Any of These Comfy T-shirts

Prescribing a Dose of Love T-shirt, $17.99+

Public Health Saves Lives T-shirt, $12.00+

I’m Not the Nurse T-shirt, $23.95+

Trust Me, I’m a Doctor T-shirt, $15.74+

☑ Doctor T-shirt, $26.75+

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.

3 States with the Most Demand for Physicians

Physicians are essential in a way that most other professions currently are not. But where is demand greatest? Here are the top 3 states.

The physician workforce, like virtually every other industry, was greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, seeing staggering job losses as the virus—and the economic fallout associated with it—swept the nation. However, due to the ongoing pandemic, physicians are obviously essential in a way that most other professions currently are not, and hiring remains steady, with the healthcare industry adding back more than 250,000 jobs during July, August, and September.

Where is the demand for physicians the greatest, though? We analyzed data from our jobs website to determine what states currently have the highest inventory of openings. Here are the top three states where physicians are needed most.

1. California

Average Annual Physician Salary in California: $203,320

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Physician Jobs in California →

2. Pennsylvania

Average Annual Physician Salary in Pennsylvania: $201,220

Noteworthy Openings in Pennsylvania:

Click Here to Search Physician Jobs in Pennsylvania →

3. New York

Average Annual Physician Salary in New York: $194,070

Noteworthy Openings in New York:

Click Here to Search Physician Jobs in New York →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Cope When You Hate Your Job

Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.

Even without the added pressure of a pandemic, working in healthcare is just plain hard. On any given day, it can be mentally, emotionally, or physically exhausting—on its worst day, a combination of all three—and the reasons you found yourself wanting to work in the field may be long forgotten, replaced with resentment and regret. So, how do you cope, when you no longer love your job? Here are five ideas to try.

Identify What You Dislike

You cannot fix a problem, unless you know what the problem is. It’s easy to say, “I hate my job,” but, surely, you don’t hate everything about it. Take a hard look at what is plaguing you. What is it that is burning you out? Is it the volume of your workload? An ornery coworker? The things you see in your specialty? Talk it through with yourself, a friend or partner, or a mental health professional, so you can truly identify where the problem lies and develop a plan to remedy the problem. It might be an easier fix than you think.

Remind Yourself Why You Chose Your Job

The power of positive thinking doesn’t fix everything, but it can certainly help. When you are feeling particularly down about your job, it might do you some good to remember why you chose your career path. If you were motivated to go into healthcare to help people, as most are, you are still helping people, even on your bad days. It’s easy to lose sight of the good, when buried beneath the bad—dig out by remembering the real, tangible, positive impact your career makes on lives every day.

Find a Battle Buddy

The buddy system might be something you haven’t thought about since grade school, but it is something that the U.S. military has used for years to increase morale, improve safety, promote problem-solving, and even prevent suicide. Battle buddies, as they are known in the military, can be beneficial in healthcare, as well. If you don’t already have a coworker you can vent to and with, make it your mission to find one. Talk things through on a regular basis, as a way to decompress and let go of negative feelings, and to also bond with your battle buddy, and allow them to do the same.

Give Yourself Something to Look Forward To

Though you may work long hours, you are not always on the clock. Make sure you spend your time outside of work mentally clocked out, as well. Fill your schedule with things you enjoy, be they socially distant time with friends and family, any number of hobbies, or even just a day in bed with your favorite TV show on the big screen. Or, better yet, reward yourself by planning a vacation. Either way, give yourself something to look forward to outside of work to get you through the day. Even if it’s something small, it may be the boost you need to make the hours tick by a little bit faster.

Look for a New Job

If all else fails, know that the role you are currently in is not the only one of its kind on the planet. Luckily, if you’re reading this article, you’re already on a healthcare job board. Take a look and see what else is out there. Who knows, you might end up in a job you just plain love.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

What Are the Most In-Demand Physician Specialties in 2020?

Every year various media outlets take a look at a wealth of past data in an attempt to predict the most in-demand medical specialties for the coming year. Predictions for 2020 began appearing in late 2019. The question now is whether or not those predictions are proving accurate in the midst of the coronavirus crisis.

Backer’s ASC Review reported on the annual Doximity physician employment report in early January. That report covered the top 10 most in-demand physician job specialties along with their average salaries based on an examination of data from 2017 through 2019.

It will be interesting to note if the Doximity report proves accurate. We will not know until sometime next year when final 2020 numbers are released. In the meantime, it is worth looking at the top 10 specialties Doximity zeroed in on.

1. Family Medicine

Few are surprised that family medicine tops the list. The medical sector has been clamoring for more family medicine doctors for years. Family medicine is the one area that consistently suffers most from profound shortages. Perhaps salary has something to do with it?

The annual salary for family medicine doctors is $242,350. Only one other specialty on the top 10 list reported a lower salary: pediatrics. Your typical pediatrician makes slightly less.

2. Internal Medicine

While internal medicine came in number two in terms of demand, it is number three when it comes to annual salary among the top 10 specialties. It is no surprise that demand for internal medicine remains high. Internists are your all-purpose doctors that can serve as family practitioners, GPs, and hospitalists.

3. Emergency Medicine

The third most in-demand physician specialty is emergency medicine. It is somewhat surprising that it follows internal medicine rather than taking the number two spot. After all, America’s emergency departments have been overwhelmed for quite some time. Perhaps the demand for emergency medicine has dropped somewhat thanks to years of Medicaid expansion.

4. Psychiatry

Fourth on the top 10 list is psychiatry. This is another big surprise. Psychiatry tends to be highly specialized – even more so than most other specialties – for obvious reasons. But the fact that psychiatry ranks so high on the list suggests that the demand for psychiatric services is increasing. What does that say about America’s mental health?

5. Obstetrics and Gynecology

Obstetrics and gynecology is not a specialty that gets a lot of play in the media. However, OB/GYN’s are enough in demand to make the 2020 top 10 list. They make an average of $335,000 annually and are more likely than some other specialties to own private practices.

6. Neurology

Number six on the top 10 list is neurology. This could be due to a number of reasons, including the fact that neurology is not one of those specialties that is frequently talked about in medical school. Neurologists do make good money, with an annual average salary of $303,000. They are often employed by large hospitals and hospital groups.

7. Radiology

Radiology is a physician specialty we expected to find much higher on the list. Nonetheless, it takes the number seven spot behind neurology. A typical radiologist can earn more than $428,000 annually working for a hospital or clinic.

8. Anesthesiology

Despite being one of the higher-paying physician specialties, anesthesiology is only number eight on the top 10 list. Being that anesthesiologists are generally employed by hospitals, a reduction in elective surgeries could explain why anesthesiology does not exhibit a higher demand.

9. Pediatrics

Given the demands on family medicine, it is surprising that pediatrics comes in at number nine. Making the top five would have seemed more normal. Nonetheless, it is what it is. Your average pediatrician makes about $223,000 annually employed in a group practice, hospital, or private practice.

10. Cardiology

The specialty with the highest annual salary also takes the lowest spot on the list. The number 10 spot goes to cardiology. Earning in excess of $453,000 annually, cardiologists are among the most well-known specialists in modern medicine. The prevalence of heart disease has seen to that.

A careful review of the top 10 list reveals some surprises, but nothing terribly unexpected. All 10 of the specialties making the list deserve to be on it. Perhaps a few positions could have been switched here and there, but the cumulative choices are quite expected.

Now it remains to be seen if the coronavirus crisis has had any measurable impact on physician demand in each of the specialties. We will not know until 2020 numbers are released in 2021. For now, it is enough to know that there still aren’t enough physicians to meet current demand. Now is a great time to start a career as a physician regardless of your chosen specialty.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

 

Mental Health of Healthcare Workers Has Tanked Amid Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is clearly taking a toll on the mental health of our nation’s healthcare workers, according to the findings of our recent survey.

The COVID-19 pandemic is clearly taking a toll on the mental health of our nation’s healthcare workers, according to the findings of our survey on mental health on the frontlines.

The results, which appear to echo findings regarding the mental health of medical personnel on China’s frontlines, show a sharp decline in perceived mental health, as well as a sizable uptick in perceived work-related stress, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The survey, which saw responses from physicians, registered nurses, advanced practitioners, respiratory therapists, and more, asked healthcare professionals on the frontlines to rate their current mental health, as well as their mental health prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. On average, prior to the pandemic, respondents ranked their mental health as a 7.88 out of 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent. 5.44 out of 10 is how the same respondents rank their current mental health.

Respondents also expressed a negative view of their employers, with the average response mostly unfavorable (4.42/10) when asked how important they feel their mental health is to their employers.

The results were as follows, including select quotes from respondents.

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your mental health prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Average Answer: 7.88/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your current mental health?
Average Answer: 5.44/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your level of work-related stress prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Average Answer: 6.08/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your current level of work-related stress?
Average Answer: 8.15/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how well do you believe you are coping with your work-related stress?
Average Answer: 6.17/10

Most Commonly Used Coping Mechanisms:
1. Physical Activity
2. Humor
2. Talking to Family/Friends
3. Avoidance
4. Prescription Medication
5. Other
6. Yoga/Meditation
7. Alcohol
8. Therapy
9. Recreational Drugs

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel your job negatively impacts your mental health?
Average Answer: 7.6/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened your mental health?
Average Answer: 7.4/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how important do you feel your mental health is to your employer?
Average Answer: 4.42/10

Is there anything else you would like to tell us regarding mental health and frontline medical workers?

“We need help. We aren’t getting it. I feel hopeless and like death is around every corner.”

“It is very stressful and depressing to work for months wearing masks, gowns and gloves and still try to deliver compassionate, effective, efficient, and personable care. No one cares about the staff’s mental health at all.”

“It’s fear of the unknown. There’s so much we don’t know about this virus—that’s frightening at times.”

“As a parent of three children dealing with the stress of bringing home COVID to my family and having no time to myself, having to do home schooling on my days off, has definitely made it exhausting and extremely high stress.”

“Essential or sacrificial?”

“You must to take care of yourself first in order to take care of anyone else, which includes your mental health. I really never understood this until the pandemic started to take its toll.”

“We mostly hear about doctors and nurses in the hospital, but therapists/dietitians/CNAs/dietary/housekeeping are also hit hard, ESPECIALLY in nursing homes because these residents are like family. Watching dozens of your “family members” die in a month is traumatizing. The first few you sob and sob, then you become numb to it, because it’s all you can do to keep going. If you cry over every death, there’ll be nothing left of you. But we don’t get the support we need to keep going. We’re treated like machines, expected to keep going, spend more and more hours and work to make sure we’re ready for a state infection control survey. We’re tired. I’m tired. I can’t handle a second wave.”

Prior to the pandemic, multiple occupations within the field were already considered high stress and the suicide risk was identified as being higher among nurses than any other profession, making the findings especially alarming. With experts predicting an escalating mental health crisis for Americans as a whole, it is especially important for healthcare professionals to be aware of their mental health, and to seek help as needed.

If you are struggling with your mental health, we urge you to ask for help. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can assist you in processing what you are experiencing. Reach out to them, if you need support at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Survey: Mental Health on the Front Lines

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, as well as the fifth straight month those on the frontlines have been treating COVID-19. How are you doing? Tell us here.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.

May is also the fifth straight month frontline medical workers have been tasked with treating patients who are battling COVID-19 in the United States, losing more than 90,000 of them along the way. That certainly takes a toll, and it appears to be causing, at least in part, some of those on the front lines to take their own lives, as well.

Two medical workers in one of the nation’s hardest hit areas, New York, died by suicide in the last month—Dr. Lorna Breen, the medical director of the emergency department at NewYork-Presbyterian Allen Hospital, and John Mondello, an emergency medical technician.

Working in healthcare can be incredibly draining—mentally, physically, and emotionally—with multiple occupations within the field being considered high stress and the suicide risk higher among nurses than any other profession. Add in a pandemic and it is more than understandable to be feeling less than your best, even if you are not working in a COVID unit.

So, how are you feeling? How is your mental health? How are you coping, or not coping, right now? We want to know.

Tell us in the survey below, and then be sure to read our tips on how to care for yourself while treating COVID-19 patients by clicking here.

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Are you working on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic in any capacity?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your current mental health?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your level of work-related stress prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your current level of work-related stress?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how well do you believe you are coping with your work-related stress?*
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What coping mechanisms are you currently relying on to help you deal with work-related stress?*
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel your job negatively impacts your mental health?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened your mental health?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how important do you feel your mental health is to your employer?*
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Is there anything else you would like to tell us regarding mental health and frontline medical workers?

By submitting this form, you are giving your permission to HealthJobsNationwide.com to republish any responses included on this form in future content that may be used on our website or social media accounts.

Verify You're a Human:

If you are struggling with your mental health, we urge you to ask for help. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can assist you in processing what you are experiencing. Reach out to them, if you need support at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Top 10 Pandemic-Proof Healthcare Jobs

Healthcare is often touted as a recession-proof industry. But is it pandemic-proof? Given the number of available jobs, it seems so. See the most in-demand position types here.

Healthcare is often touted as a recession-proof industry. This is typically believed, because, even in the worst economic times, people still require medical care. However, it is proving not to be entirely pandemic-proof, with more than 40,000 healthcare professionals being laid off in March, when COVID-19 began to significantly impact nearly every industry in the United States.

Healthcare is still hiring for a surprisingly large number of positions, though, despite the pandemic continuing on, and not all of them are related to COVID-19, either.

Here are the top ten most in-demand positions right now, according to data from our job board.

1. Registered Nurse

Number of Available Jobs: 7,761
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, New York, Massachusetts
View All Registered Nurse Jobs →

2. Physician

Number of Available Jobs: 4,141
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, New York, Pennsylvania
View All Physician Jobs →

3. Speech Language Pathologist

Number of Available Jobs: 3,462
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Speech Language Pathologist Jobs →

4. Physical Therapist

Number of Available Jobs: 2,840
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Physical Therapist Jobs →

5. Nurse Practitioner

Number of Available Jobs: 2,222
States with the Most Available Jobs: New York, California, Connecticut
View All Nurse Practitioner Jobs →

5. Occupational Therapist

Number of Available Jobs: 2,222
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Occupational Therapist Jobs →

7. Physical Therapist Assistant

Number of Available Jobs: 1,833
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Physical Therapist Assistant Jobs →

8. Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant

Number of Available Jobs: 1,725
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant Jobs →

9. Respiratory Therapist

Number of Available Jobs: 1,703
States with the Most Available Jobs: Pennsylvania, Alaska, Florida
View All Respiratory Therapist Jobs →

10. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

Number of Available Jobs: 1,346
States with the Most Available Jobs: Texas, California, Virginia
View All Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Jobs →

Don’t see your position listed? That doesn’t mean it isn’t hiring. Search for it on our job board by clicking here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Freebies, Discounts, & Perks for Healthcare’s Heroes

To recognize the heroic efforts of frontline medical staff, companies are offering promotions as a way of giving back. Here’s a giant list of them.

Last Updated: May 11th, 2020 at 8:50 AM ET. Please see individual websites for further details about offers, including whether or not they have expired.

No one has proven more essential through the COVID-19 crisis than the medical professionals who are working on the frontlines of the pandemic. To recognize your heroic efforts, scores of companies across the nation are offering promotions as a way of giving back.

To make it a bit easier to know what is being offered to you, we’ve compiled a list of some of the available free and discounted goods and services, as well as other perks, and have posted it below.

Please note, this list is by no means complete. However, it is extensive, and we will continue to update it, as we come across new promotions and as promotions expire or reach their limit. If you are aware of a promotion not listed below, or if you discover that a promotion listed has expired, please email us by clicking here.

If you have any questions about a specific promotion, please direct those questions to the company offering the promotion. Thank you.

PPE

Mask Match — Free Masks
If you are a healthcare worker in need of a mask, Mask Match will try to connect you with someone who has masks to donate. Fill out the “I Need Masks” form to get started.
Learn More →

Apparel, Goods, and Services

Adidas — 40% Off
Adidas offers 15% off year-round for first responders and nurses. However, they have increased that discount program to 40% off during the COVID-19 crisis.
Learn More →

Big Lots — 15% Off
Big Lots is offering a 15% discount off everything for medical professionals, first responders, and active military/veterans. Just show your badge or work/military ID or use code BIGHEROES online. This offer is good through May 31st.
Learn More →

BJ’s Wholesale Club — Priority Access
BJ’s Wholesale Club, at all of its locations, will have an Appreciation Hour from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. on Sundays for first responders and healthcare workers. During this designated time period, first responders and healthcare workers can shop in all of BJ’s locations without a membership.
Learn More →

Care.com — Free Premium Access
Care.com is providing one month of free, premium access to their site to support frontline medical workers who need help with finding care for their children, parents, and pets.
Learn More →

Clarks — 50% Off
Shoe manufacturer and retailer, Clarks, is offering a 50% discount for nurses and first responders. Limit one 50% off code per nurse or medical professional. Verify your ID through ID.me to receive the discount.
Learn More →

Costco — Priority Access
Costco is temporarily offering priority access to members who are healthcare workers and first responders, such as police officers, EMTs and firefighters. Just present your Costco membership card and official identification of your role to move to the front of the line.
Learn More →

Crocs — Free Crocs
Crocs is donating 10,000 shoes a day through their “Sharing a Pair for Healthcare” initiative. All you have to do is go to the Crocs website and get in line at 12:00 PM ET for each day’s giveaway.
Learn More →

Dearfoams — Free Slippers — Limit Reached/Giveaway Expired
Dearfoams is giving away free slippers to healthcare workers, and has also committed to donating 100,000 face masks to healthcare heroes.
Learn More →

Dollar General — In-Store Discount
Dollar General is offering an in-store discount of an unspecified amount to all medical personnel, first responders, and activated National Guardsmen. Just present your employer badge or ID. It was previously announced that the discount would be 10%, and may be more or less at this time.
Learn More →

Dr. Scholl’s — Free Insoles
Dr. Scholl’s is donating 100,000 pairs of Dr. Scholl’s Massaging Gel Work insoles to healthcare workers across the country, totaling a $1.3 million donation. Hospitals can email coronavirus.outreach@drscholls.com to submit a request for their medical staff.
Learn More →

Food Network — Free Access
Food Network is giving healthcare professionals 1 year of free access to their app, Food Network Kitchen, which offers step-by-step cooking tutorials, as well as commercial-free access to Food Network shows.
Learn More →

Home Shopping Network — 15% Off
Home Shopping Network is offering nurses 15% off any single item on HSN.com. Exclusions apply. Coupon valid through December 31st, 2020.
Learn More →

Jansport — 50% Off
Jansport, the maker of backpacks, bags, and accessories, is offering 50% for medical professionals and first responders. This offer is valid through June 30th, 2020.
Learn More →

Nike — 20% Off
For a limited time, Nike has increased their first responder and medical professional discount from 10% to 20%. Doctors, nurses, technicians, medical researchers, EMTs, firefighters, law enforcement, and more are eligible for the discount.
Learn More →

The North Face — 50% Off
From April 14, 2020 to December 31, 2020 The North Face will be giving a 50% discount to healthcare workers in the U.S. This discount can be used for the purchase of non-sale items on their website and at The North Face-owned retail stores in the United States.
Learn More →

Publix — Priority Access
First responders and hospital staff will be permitted to shop in Publix and access in-store pharmacies an hour after closing to the general public on Thursday evenings, from 8:00 until 9:00 PM, and an hour before opening to the general public on Friday mornings, from 7:00 until 8:00 AM until further notice.
Learn More →

Reebok — 50% Off
Reebok has increased their longstanding company discount to first responders and educators to 50% off. All nurses, military members, educators and first responders can shop 50% off at Reebok.com with no exceptions during this time.
Learn More →

Sam’s Club — Priority Access
Beginning April 19th, Sam’s Club is offering priority access to members who are healthcare workers and first responders during their “Hero Hours,” which are special shopping hours on Sundays from 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM.
Learn More →

Samsung — Up to 30% Off/Free Repairs
Samsung has extended their employee discount to all first responders and their families, which includes free repairs for Samsung phones, as well as up to 30% off products.
Learn More →

Tide — Free Laundry Services
Tide is offering free laundry services and dry cleaning to the families (defined as ‘next of kin’ e.g. same household/address) of frontline responders including nurses, doctors, paramedics, hospital/medical staff, medical researchers, police officers, and firefighters. The offer is good in participating cities through May 9.
Learn More →

Under Armour — 40% Off
Under Armour is recognizing those on the front lines by offering a 40% off discount for military members, first responders, health care workers and teachers. Just choose ‘Military and First Responder Discount’ at checkout to get your discount.
Learn More →

YETI — 20% Off
YETI, maker of coolers, drinkware, bags, and more, is offering a 20% discount to medical professionals and first responders. Verify your ID to receive the discount. Some restrictions apply.
Learn More →

Food & Beverages

Circle K — Free Coffee, Tea, or Fountain Drink — Limit Reached/Giveaway Expired
First responders and health care workers can get a free coffee, tea, or Polar Pop Fountain Drink when they show an ID through April 30.
Learn More →

DoorDash — Free or Discounted Delivery
DoorDash, the food delivery app, is actively partnering with hospitals in the U.S. and Canada to provide free access to Corporate DashPass. Every doctor, nurse, and hospital employee from partnering hospitals will receive at least 60 days of free DashPass, which eliminates or reduces delivery fees from local restaurants.
Learn More →

Dunkin’ — Free Coffee and Donut — Limit Reached/Giveaway Expired
On the first day of National Nurses Week, Wednesday, May 6, Dunkin’ is offering a free medium hot or iced coffee and a free donut to all healthcare workers who visit participating Dunkin’ restaurants nationwide, while supplies last. Not purchase necessary. Excludes Cold Brew and Nitro Cold Brew, Limit 1 per guest. Not valid on mobile orders.
Learn More →

Hooters — 20% Off
Hospital workers, first responders, and military personnel get 20% off at Hooters. Show your work ID for curbside pickup orders, or for online orders choose the “Pay at Store” option.
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IHOP — 20% Off
Get 20% off your entire check if you’re a medical, law enforcement, military, and firefighter professional. All you need to do is mention the offer when you call in your order to IHOP. Then, show your official ID when you pick up your order.
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Krispy Kreme — Free Dozen Donuts
Every Monday, Krispy Kreme is giving free dozens of their iconic Original Glazed® Doughnuts to healthcare workers. Just go to a Krispy Kreme drive-thru, tell them what you need, and show your employer badgeLimit five dozen per healthcare worker. Valid until May 12.
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Little Caesars Pizza — Free Pizzas
Little Caesars Pizza will be donating and delivering a million pizzas to healthcare workers and first responders in the U.S. in the next few weeks. Starting April 13, customers can also “Pie it Forward” and donate a pizza to their local hospital, police station, or fire station via the Little Caesars app.
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McDonald’s — Free Meal — Limit Reached/Giveaway Expired
Participating McDonald’s locations will provide the option of a free Thank You Meal to first responders and healthcare workers, valid all day and night between April 22nd and May 5th. Frontline workers, including healthcare professionals, can order these meals via the drive thru or the McDonald’s app and will be asked to show their ID badge during the pick-up process.
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Nando’s PERi-PERi — Free Meals
The fast-casual chicken restaurant, which has locations in Illinois, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia, is providing free meals to anyone with a valid hospital ID. Limited to one meal per day while supplies last. Valid through May 17th, 2020.
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Racetrac — Free Small Coffee or Fountain Drink — Limit Reached/Giveaway Expired
Racetrac is offering all essential workers, who are either wearing their uniform and/or have valid ID, a free small coffee or small fountain drink now through April 30. Limit one per person per day.
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Starbucks — Free Hot or Cold Tall Brewed Coffee — Limit Reached/Giveaway Expired
Starbucks has announced that “any customer who identifies as a first responder or front-line worker supporting our healthcare system” can get a free hot or cold tall brewed coffee on each visit through May 3.
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Thistle — 10% Off
Thistle, a ready-to-eat, food delivery service, is offering 10% off all deliveries to healthcare workers through May. Use code HOSPITALHEROES at checkout or reach out to hello@thistle.co for more details.
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Tropical Smoothie Cafe — Free Smoothies
Medical professionals and first responders can contact their local Tropical Smoothie shop to have free smoothies delivered to your team.
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Wawa — Free Coffee
Wawa, which has locations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, Florida, and Washington D.C., is offering free coffee to healthcare workers and first responders for the length of the Coronavirus pandemic.
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White Castle — Free Castle Combo or Breakfast Combo — Limit Reached/Giveaway Expired
White Castle is offering a free Castle Combo or breakfast combo to healthcare workers and EMTs, valid through the end of April. This is good for drive-thru only and you must show ID to receive the offer.
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Health & Wellness

Down Dog — Free Access
Down Dog is offering all of its apps, including Down Dog, Yoga for Beginners, HIIT, Barre, and 7 Minute Workout, completely free for nurses, doctors, and other healthcare professionals through July 1.
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Headspace — Free Access
Headspace is offering free access to its meditation app through 2020 for anyone working in a public health setting.
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Neurocore Counseling — Free Telehealth Counseling
Neurocore Counseling is offering free telehealth counseling to medical personnel and first responders through May 1 or longer.
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Training Mate — Free Streaming Workouts
The LA-based gym is offering a free month of streaming workouts for frontline healthcare professionals.
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Lodging, Travel, Transportation

Airbnb — No Fees
Find a frontline stay specially prepared for first responders through Airbnb, with the company waiving fees for the first 100k stays booked through their COVID-19 relief program.
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BP/Amoco — $.50 Off Per Gallon of Gasoline
The gas station chain is offering a discount of 50 cents off per gallon for first responders and health care workers the next time they fill up at BP or Amoco gas stations in the US.
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Choice Hotels — Discounted Hotel Rates
Choice Hotels is offering a “Choice Cares” special rate for nurses, doctors, paramedics, firefighters, food/agriculture workers, transit employees, and others outlined by CISA guidelines. Up to 9 nights can be booked with the special rate.
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Hilton Hotels — Free and Discounted Hotel Rates
Hilton Hotels, in partnership with American Express, will donate up to 1 million hotel room nights across the United States to frontline medical professionals leading the fight against COVID-19. They will make rooms available without charge to doctors, nurses, EMTs, paramedics and other frontline medical staff who need a place to sleep, recharge, or isolate from their families through the end of May.
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Honda Motor Company — $500 Off
Honda is offering nurses and other healthcare professionals $500 savings toward any 2019 or newer model year Honda when they finance or lease with Honda Financial Services®. Available until July 6, 2020.
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Marriott Bonvoy — Free and Discounted Hotel Rates
Marriott Bonvoy, in collaboration with American Express and JPMorgan Chase, has started a new initiative called Rooms for Responders which will provide $10 million in hotel stays for doctors and nurses leading the fight against COVID-19. They also offer their Community Caregiver Program, which provides significantly discounted rates for first responders and healthcare professionals who want to book rooms at hotels near the hospitals where they work.
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Red Roof Inn — 15-20% Off
Travel nurses with valid ID can get 20% off their stay at Red Roof Inn when they book online or call 1-800-733-7663. Discounts are also available to members of Advantage RN (20% off) and Emergency Nurses Association (15% off).
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Sixt Rent a Car — 5% Off
Sixt Rent a Car is offering a 5% discount on car rentals to doctors and other medical staff. Bring valid ID when you pick up your vehicle.
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Uber — Free Transportation
Uber Health is providing free transportation for frontline healthcare workers, helping them get to and from patients’ homes, as well as between healthcare facilities. They are also providing free meals on Uber Eats to first responders and healthcare workers in US and Canada, in coordination with local, state, and provincial governments.
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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Join the Fight Against COVID-19

We encourage all healthcare professionals who are able to join the fight against COVID-19 to register with us and label themselves as #covid19 ready.

Our nation is facing an incredibly trying time due to COVID-19, and it is being felt the deepest on healthcare’s front lines. As a leading healthcare job board, we feel it is our responsibility to assist hospitals and health systems across the U.S. to be properly staffed during the COVID-19 crisis, not only to better serve their communities, but to help alleviate the enormous strain placed on healthcare professionals due to staffing shortages and increased patient volume.

We encourage all healthcare professionals who are ready, willing, and able to join the fight against COVID-19 to register with us and label themselves as #covid19 ready.

To do so, please take the following steps:

  • Create or update a profile on HealthJobsNationwide.com by clicking here.
  • Fill in all required information, and along with your current specialty, be sure to select the temporary specialty “#covid19” in the Specialty dropdown. This will allow hospitals and healthcare facilities to easily find and contact you.
  • Then, if and when you are ready, search COVID-19 related jobs on our site by clicking here.

Thank you for all you have done and will continue to do through this crisis. We are with you.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Care for Yourself While Treating COVID-19 Patients

People who work in healthcare are being stretched beyond their limits due to COVID-19. Here are tips to take care of yourself while caring for others.

Right now, people who work in healthcare across the United States are being stretched beyond their limits due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Working in an industry that normally experiences a rampant burnout problem, it is important to take extra care of yourself during this especially trying time, not only so you can continue to be effective in your role, but to stay as mentally and physically healthy as possible. Here are some tips, based on recommendations made by the CDC, on how to properly care for yourself while treating patients of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Make a Plan

  • Try to learn as much as possible about what role you will play in responding to the outbreak, so you are able to plan, both for work and your home life.
  • Speak with your supervisor about any concerns you have and any questions you need answered regarding your role in response to COVID-19, as well as day-to-day operations.
  • If you will be working abnormally long hours, explain this to your loved ones and set boundaries, particularly for communication. Your work will be demanding and you will not be able to respond to every call, text, or email in real time, and this needs to be expressed to people who may not understand the pressure you will be under.

Understand & Identify Burnout & Secondary Traumatic Stress

  • Anyone and everyone can be susceptible to burning out or experiencing Secondary Traumatic Stress when dealing with a crisis such as COVID-19.
  • Knowing the difference between the two is important. Burnout is defined as feelings of extreme exhaustion and being overwhelmed, while Secondary Traumatic Stress is categorized by experiencing stress reactions and symptoms resulting from exposure to another individual’s traumatic experiences, rather than from exposure directly to a traumatic event.
  • Symptoms of burnout include: experiencing sadness, depression, or apathy; feeling easily frustrated or irritable; lacking feelings, or feeling indifferent; disconnection from others; poor self-care and hygiene; feeling tired, exhausted or overwhelmed.
  • Symptoms of Secondary Traumatic Stress include: excessively worrying or fearing about something bad happening; being easily startled, or feeling like you must be “on guard” all of the time; physical signs of stress, such as a rapid heartbeat; experiencing nightmares or recurrent thoughts about the traumatic situation; feeling that others’ trauma is yours.
  • Coping techniques such as taking breaks, eating healthy foods, exercising, routinely sleeping, and using the buddy system can help prevent and reduce burnout and Secondary Traumatic Stress.

Get Support

  • You are not alone in what you are experiencing. Enact a buddy system, in which you and another person who is responding to the COVID-19 crisis partner together to support each other, as well as monitor each other’s stress, workload, and safety.
  • Check in with each other on a daily basis to offer support, be that in the form of listening or sharing.
  • Help each other with basic needs, such as sharing supplies or transportation.
  • Encourage each other to take breaks, and share opportunities for stress relief, such as exercise or meditation.

Practice Self Care

  • Caring for yourself may be the last thing on your mind when treating patients impacted by the virus, but it is the most important thing you can do.
  • Given the contagious nature of COVID-19, having your immune system in top shape is imperative. Beyond that, stress prevention and management is critical so you can stay well and continue to help in the situation.
  • Effective self care techniques for healthcare workers include:
    • If at all possible, limit workdays to 12 hours or less.
    • Work in teams as much as possible and limit the time you spend working alone.
    • Talk to family, friends, supervisors, teammates, or mental health professionals about your feelings and experiences.
    • Journal your thoughts on a regular basis.
    • Practice breathing and relaxation techniques.
    • Maintain a healthy diet and get adequate sleep and exercise.
    • Avoid or limit consumption of caffeine and alcohol.
  • Know that it is healthy to draw boundaries and to say “no.”
  • It is important to remind yourself that it is not selfish to take breaks when you need them, and that asking for help is okay.
  • The needs of your patients are important, but they are not more important than your well-being. There are others who can help, when you need to help yourself.

Get Help If & When You Need It

You are not alone. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can help you to process what you are experiencing. Reach out to them, if you need support at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.