Kansas Becomes 26th State to Loosen NP Practice Restrictions

Nurse practitioner jobs in Kansas now offer a bit more freedom thanks to a bill recently signed into law by Governor Laura Kelly. The bill eliminates the need for direct supervision among nurse practitioners looking to provide the primary care they are trained and licensed to perform. Kansas is the 26th state to make the change. Two U.S. territories and the District of Columbia have also given greater practice authority to NPs.

 Will the remaining twenty-four states follow suit? That’s hard to say. A similar bill was defeated in Colorado in early 2022. In other states, legislators are not even having the discussion. Whether or not to sever the supervisory relationship between physicians and nurse practitioners is by no means settled.

 Independent Primary Care

 Prior to the new law, Kansas nurse practitioners were allowed to offer primary care under the supervision of a physician. An NP could work in the supervising doctor’s office or, with a written agreement in place, offer care in a separate facility. In either case, the NP’s scope and practice remained subject to doctor supervision.

 Such restrictive scope and practice laws have been common in the U.S. for decades. However, the COVID pandemic made it clear that NPs and their physician assistant counterparts are more than capable of providing quality primary care without being tethered to a physician. Perhaps that’s why just over half the states have since loosened their restrictions.

 The most intriguing aspect of eliminating direct supervision is its potential impact on nurse practitioner jobs. How will NPs choose to practice in states that don’t require it?

 Retail Primary Care

 A recent Forbes article by Senior contributor Bruce Japsen briefly mentioned the proliferation of retail healthcare clinics operated by well-known companies like CVS. The retail health clinic is nothing new, but it has gained widespread attention thanks to the pandemic. Such clinics are prime candidates for independent nurse practitioners.

 Japsen suggests that patients could be willing to seek primary care from a nurse practitioner in a retail clinic if that meant avoiding crowded doctors’ offices and long waits in the waiting room. It is hard to argue his point. Anyone who has sat waiting an hour or more for the doctor, only to be given 10 minutes of their time, might welcome the opportunity to walk into a retail clinic, see the NP, and be out the door in under 30 minutes.

 Of course, not all retail clinics get patients in and out as quickly. But the advantage of the retail model is that nurse practitioners are not bound by tight scheduling. They can see fewer patients in a day and, as a result, spend more time with each patient.

 Not Everyone on Board

 It is clear that not everyone is on board with the idea of loosening restrictions on nurse practitioner jobs. There are doctors and healthcare groups who don’t feel as though NPs have enough training to work independently. There are also patients who just do not feel comfortable visiting with an NP – especially if a doctor is available.

 Efforts to prevent states from cutting direct ties between physicians and nurse practitioners is to be expected. Healthcare is a very touchy subject for obvious reasons. Therefore, wide differences of opinion are part of any debate. Furthermore, such differences are not always worked out as evidenced by the fact that there are still twenty-four states that require physician supervision of nurse practitioners in primary care settings.

 Such supervision is no longer necessary in Kansas. With the new law in place, Kansas joins twenty-five other states in allowing nurse petitioners to practice independently.

by Tim Rush (CEO HSI, LLC)

Are Physician Assistant Jobs Jeopardized by Supervision Rules?

If two years of the COVID pandemic have taught us anything, it is that the U.S. healthcare system is anything but perfect. At the pandemic’s height, many states went so far as to temporarily relax rules regarding how and where physician assistants and nurse practitioners can work. Now, with the pandemic mostly behind us, it is time to answer an important question: are physician assistant jobs jeopardized by supervision rules?

 The question was central to the debate of a bill that was recently defeated in Colorado. House Bill 1095 would have given physician assistants a bit more freedom to practice independent of direct physician supervision. In the end, the bill was defeated after heavy lobbying by medical groups and others opposed to the changes.

Access to Quality Care

 Among its provisions, House Bill 1095 would have allowed physician assistants to work independently, but still require them to consult with a patient’s healthcare team, as they already do. Those opposed to the measure argued that freeing PAs from direct physician supervision would limit access to quality care. Some argued it could even be dangerous. The argument appears sound, but there are two sides to every coin.

 Proponents of the bill argued that PAs routinely live under the shadow of potential unemployment because their work is intrinsically tied to a physician’s job. In rural areas for example, there may be a single physician assistant working under the supervision of a single doctor. If that doctor decides to leave and go elsewhere, not having another doctor to immediately step in could mean the physician assistant loses their job. Likewise, patients served by that PA would lose access to healthcare services.

 Is either situation better or worse than the other? That is for politicians to figure out. In Colorado, they decided it is better to maintain the status quo. For the time being, PA jobs in the state will continue being subjected to physician supervision.

Other States Are Loosening Up

 If you are in favor of less supervision for physician assistants, you will be happy to know that other states are loosening their restrictions. A bill passed in Utah in 2021 eliminates the direct supervision requirement after a PA works for so many hours under a doctor.

 For example, a PA would work directly under a supervising doctor for 4,000 hours. After that, another 6,000 hours of supervision would be required – either under a doctor or another PA with 10,000 hours of experience. Completing both regimens would give a PA 10,000 hours of supervised work, leading to the right to practice independently.

Scope of Practice Remains the Same

 Whether you are talking Colorado’s defeated bill, Utah’s passed bill, or rules in any of the other states, the bigger issue is scope and practice. A PA’s scope and practice is clearly defined by state law. Proponents of the unsupervised work model say that PAs are not looking to broaden it. They are happy to continue doing what they do. They simply want to be able to do it without being tethered to a physician whose interests may or may not be aligned with the PA’s.

 What we are really talking here is primary care. That is what PAs provide in most settings. They handle routine cases so that doctors can focus on more serious cases. As a patient, this makes sense to me. If a physician assistant is trained and licensed to provide primary care, direct supervision by a doctor seems redundant.

 Are physician assistant jobs jeopardized by supervision rules? Proponents of Colorado’s recently defeated bill seem to think so. They make a good point.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Use Healthcare Job Boards More Effectively

It used to be that using a healthcare job board required very little effort above and beyond posting your resume and waiting for responses. Many job seekers still do that today. However, the most successful use healthcare job boards differently. They do more than post their resumes and wait.

 As far as job boards go, Health Jobs Nationwide is among the best. We are comfortable saying that because of the tens of thousands of listings we offer along with the well-known, reputable companies who post their jobs with us. Still, the quality of our job board alone will not get you hired. There is more to it.

 The good news is that we won’t leave you hanging. Below are strategies for helping you utilize healthcare job boards more effectively. Ultimately, our goal is to be your gateway to the physician, nurse practitioner, or registered nurse position you are looking for.

 1. Practice Different Filtering Methods

 Healthcare job boards like ours tend to offer multiple filtering methods. We do this because job applicants have different ways of searching. What must be understood is that our filters are heavily dependent on the data posters enter. This means that not every job that could be appropriate to your search will turn up under all your filters.

 From a practical standpoint, you may have to utilize several different filters. Don’t stress over it. Just practice utilizing different filters to see the results they turn up. With enough practice, you will know exactly how to search every time you log on.

 2. Take Advantage of Employer ATS

 Healthcare employers receive so many resumes that they just don’t have the resources to manually look through each and every one. So these days, they use automated systems known as applicant tracking systems (ATS) to narrow down potential candidates. Out of 500 resumes, perhaps only 30-50 will be actually viewed by human eyes.

 You increase your chances of getting your resume seen by understanding and taking advantage of ATS. For starters, always send your resume and CV in .pdf format. That’s the one format most ATS systems can read. If you submit a .docx, your resume may not make it past the first level.

 Next, don’t use tables, text boxes, etc. Most ATS systems cannot read the data contained in boxes and tables, so that data will be ignored. However, do use formatting – like headings, for example. An ATS can recognize headings like ‘Education’, ‘Work History’, and so forth.

 Finally, use the right keywords. ATS systems are a lot like search engines in that they look for keywords to understand a document. Use keywords that are appropriate to the type of job you are looking for. If you’re not sure what those keywords are, look in the job description of a particular post. That will tell you everything you need to know.

 3. Make Proactive Contact

 Finally, the one thing about job seeking that hasn’t changed is the need to be proactive. After you submit your resume and CV to a particular employer, try to make contact with someone in that organization. A common suggestion among job coaches is to look up the employer on LinkedIn. You might find an HR officer, healthcare administrator, or someone else you can connect with. A simple note of introduction is all you need.

 Healthcare job boards are a fantastic resource for finding career opportunities across the country. Whether you are looking to stay local, or you are prepared to move, don’t just submit your resume and wait. Utilize the three strategies described in this post and you’ll increase the chances of finding a great job.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Why America Needs Nurses Now More than Ever

It’s 2022 and COVID-19 and its variants still represent a massive threat to public health. At the same time, however, a nursing shortage threatens the effectiveness of healthcare solutions for the general public. Now, estimates suggest that 1.2 million more registered nurses (RNs) will be needed by 2030 to adequately serve the populace.

This flood of demand has made RNs America’s most wanted healthcare worker. Now, we need nurses more than ever. And yet, the causes of the nursing shortage continue to rage, limiting our ability to replace retiring nursing staff.

Facing major implications for public health, evaluating and solving these causes is essential. Understanding is the first step in a healthcare environment more inviting for professional nurses.

What is Causing the Nursing Shortage?

First, let’s look at some of the measurable causes of the nursing shortage. These are observed patterns in the data that reflect bottlenecks and challenges that may come to affect the way most of us receive care in the future, should the situation not improve. These causes include:

  1. The aging population. Lifespans, birthrates, and advancing medicine have all contributed to a changing demographic. By 2030, it’s estimated that one in five people will be a senior. This is an age group that requires more care and more nurses to care for them.
  2. Retiring nurses. Similarly, healthcare workers themselves are aging up. With one-third of the workforce age 50 or older, retirements are occurring faster than nursing staff can be replaced. This is a problem exacerbated by the next cause of the worsening nursing shortage.
  3. Limited newcomers. Nursing schools can only train so many people. Meanwhile, the COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging on many learning institutions. The rate of new to retiring nurses isn’t enough to make up for lost workers, and patients are the worse for it.

All these causal factors were present in the healthcare industry even before the pandemic emerged, but COVID drove the shortage to new depths. That’s because pandemic conditions have redoubled our reliance on nursing staff and overburdened them to the point of frequent burnout.

In a survey of 6,500 critical care nurses, 66% said they were considering leaving their careers because of their COVID experiences. Meanwhile, 92% said that nurses at their hospitals had cut their careers short as a result of burnout. These numbers represent vital healthcare staff that we cannot afford to lose. And yet, the shortage is a looming threat impacting us all.

America is in desperate need of nurses but the conditions of the job as well as larger social factors make it exceptionally difficult to fill the gaps. Incentives and workloads have to be adjusted if we are to change these circumstances in the future.

In the meantime, what exactly are the implications of not enough nurses in our hospitals and care facilities? These will be the effects we’ll see play out unless this negative trend is disrupted.

The Effects of Not Enough Nurses

A world with too few nurses is a world in which no one should want to live. These care professionals fulfill many of the most important functions within a care institution. Without their work, being seen and treated for any and all health conditions would take longer and would be less effective. The consequences of such a reality would be negative for everyone involved — from the average patient to the doctor who would then have to take on a much greater burden.

As you explore the question of America’s nursing shortages, keep in mind the associated effects. These include:

  1. Longer care wait times and expenses. Nurses take care of just about all the care-related tasks that don’t require a doctor’s training to legally treat. This includes record-keeping and administrative functions. The fewer nurses available to check in with patients, move them along, and conduct vital care processes, the longer patients will have to wait for care. Meanwhile, relying on more highly trained medical staff for every procedure all but guarantees higher costs for patients.
  2. A lack of empathy in care. Empathy is essential to care. There is something healing in the simple act of a human being listening and being friendly, and nurses provide this empathy in heaps. Where it is applied in healthcare, empathy has been found to improve care satisfaction and even reduce burnout rates in hospital staff. However, human professionals are needed to practice empathy.
  3. A greater reliance on tech. Amidst nursing shortages, care practices are increasingly turning to tech to fill labor gaps. The implications of these tools are enormous. Chatbots, for instance, are taking down patient symptomsand computing diagnoses, sometimes with even greater efficiency than human workers. As these tools improve, some healthcare roles may even be automated out of existence.

A world with too few nurses presents too many challenges for society to accept. Instead, the industry looks to potential solutions for staffing and supporting care facilities while inspiring new generations of nurses. With a need this desperate, the healthcare industry must apply all the tools and tricks necessary to reduce nursing labor gaps.

A Life-Threatening Need

When it comes to healthcare, labor shortages present real risks to life and well-being. That’s why the 1.2 million nurses needed within the next eight years is a scary number. Without nurses, care is longer, worse, and more robotic. However, this last point may also be part of the solution.

Just as artificial intelligence presents certain risks to human workers (such as displacement), it can produce benefitsas well. Through automated data collection, chatbot interfaces, personal medical AI, and more, healthcare work is changing for the better. This means reduced workloads for nurses and potentially less-stressful work environments in which to care for patients.

The causes of the nursing shortage may be too widespread and human to fully correct. However, supportive technology may help to reduce the negative implications of this shortage and even encourage up-and-coming talent. Perhaps when nurses all have personal AIs to make the job easier, nursing schools won’t be able to handle the flood of compassionate individuals wanting to save lives and make a difference.

**Article Image Source: Pexels

         

      Katie Brenneman is a passionate writer specializing in lifestyle, mental health, activism-related content. When she isn’t writing, you can find her with her nose buried in a book or hiking with her dog, Charlie. To connect with Katie, you can follow her on Twitter. 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare’s Most Wanted

Healthcare professionals are clearly some of the most essential workers in the country. But which are needed the most right now and where? We break it down for you.

More than a year on from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the resulting record unemployment rate of 14.8%, the job market has begun to stabilize, nearing pre-pandemic figures—5.1% in August of 2021, compared to 3.5% in February of 2020.

Through it all, though, healthcare employment has been essential. Despite job losses in some specialties and settings, our nation has needed doctors, nurses, and the like on the frontlines in a way no other industry has seen a need for employment. Lives were literally on the line, and jobs had to be filled to save them. A sentiment that is true, once again, as hospitals fill to capacity in some parts of the country, due to the Delta variant.

What types of healthcare professionals are needed the most now, and where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

10 Most In-Demand Position Types:

  1. Registered Nurses
  2. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses
  3. Physicians
  4. Technicians
  5. Physical Therapists
  6. Certified Nursing Assistants
  7. Nurse Practitioners
  8. Speech Language Pathologists
  9. Respiratory Therapists
  10. Occupational Therapists

10 Most In-Demand Specialties:

  1. Insurance
  2. Education
  3. Intensive Care
  4. Patient Care
  5. Telemetry
  6. Home Health
  7. Customer Service
  8. Pediatrics
  9. Rehabilitation
  10. Pharmacy

10 Most In-Demand Locations:

  1. California
  2. Georgia
  3. Texas
  4. Pennsylvania
  5. Florida
  6. New York
  7. Illinois
  8. North Carolina
  9. Ohio
  10. Massachusetts

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where Healthcare Support Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Working in healthcare has always garnered a lot of respect, especially over the last year. But is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Working in healthcare can garner a lot of respect, as we’ve certainly seen over the last year with many in the industry being hailed as heroes for working on the frontlines of the pandemic.

However, is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Below are the ten states offering the highest and the lowest average salaries for ten popular healthcare support professions, listed alphabetically, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $108,400
  2. Hawaii – $101,570
  3. Alaska – $95,990
  4. District of Columbia – $94,260
  5. Rhode Island – $92,460
  6. Washington – $92,150
  7. Oregon – $91,550
  8. Massachusetts – $89,080
  9. Wisconsin – $86,810
  10. Colorado – $86,370

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $57,870
  2. Georgia – $61,100
  3. Mississippi – $62,600
  4. West Virginia – $62,920
  5. Louisiana – $63,520
  6. Arkansas – $64,670
  7. South Dakota – $64,840
  8. Tennessee – $65,750
  9. Michigan – $66,020
  10. Kentucky – $67,520

EMTs & Paramedics – Highest Paying States

  1. Hawaii – $58,580
  2. Washington – $56,910
  3. Maryland – $53,440
  4. Alaska – $50,030
  5. California – $48,280
  6. Illinois – $48,040
  7. District of Columbia – $47,460
  8. New York – $46,920
  9. Massachusetts – $46,110
  10. Connecticut – $45,800

EMTs & Paramedics – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $30,520
  2. Alabama – $30,770
  3. Kansas – $31,500
  4. Kentucky – $32,030
  5. Mississippi – $32,250
  6. South Dakota – $33,110
  7. Montana – $34,090
  8. Michigan – $34,410
  9. Arkansas – $34,630
  10. Ohio – $34,680

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $35,360
  2. North Dakota – $34,020
  3. Massachusetts – $33,890
  4. Vermont – $33,810
  5. Washington – $32,860
  6. New York – $32,140
  7. District of Columbia – $31,810
  8. California – $31,270
  9. Rhode Island – $30,790
  10. Oregon – $30,730

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $19,800
  2. Alabama – $20,960
  3. Mississippi – $21,520
  4. West Virginia – $21,730
  5. Texas – $21,750
  6. Oklahoma – $22,320
  7. North Carolina – $22,920
  8. Tennessee – $23,130
  9. Virginia – $23,360
  10. Arkansas – $23,510

Medical Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $46,610
  2. Washington – $45,700
  3. District of Columbia – $45,340
  4. Massachusetts – $43,090
  5. Minnesota – $43,090
  6. California – $42,990
  7. Oregon – $41,700
  8. Connecticut – $41,070
  9. Hawaii – $40,530
  10. New York – $39,850

Medical Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $29,820
  2. Alabama – $29,950
  3. Mississippi – $30,550
  4. Louisiana – $31,110
  5. Arkansas – $31,530
  6. Oklahoma – $31,790
  7. South Dakota – $31,910
  8. Kansas – $32,030
  9. New Mexico – $32,340
  10. South Carolina – $33,010

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. District of Columbia – $47,110
  2. California – $46,140
  3. Washington – $45,990
  4. Massachusetts – $44,900
  5. Rhode Island – $43,740
  6. Hawaii – $43,620
  7. New Jersey – $43,130
  8. Minnesota – $42,730
  9. Oregon – $42,550
  10. New York – $42,170

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Mississippi – $30,980
  2. Louisiana – $32,680
  3. West Virginia – $32,940
  4. Tennessee – $33,460
  5. Montana – $33,550
  6. New Mexico – $33,710
  7. Kentucky – $34,080
  8. Oklahoma – $34,200
  9. Wyoming – $35,110
  10. Florida – $35,150

Nursing Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $42,500
  2. New York – $40,620
  3. California – $39,280
  4. Hawaii – $38,650
  5. Massachusetts – $37,160
  6. Oregon – $37,100
  7. District of Columbia – $36,980
  8. Washington – $36,310
  9. Minnesota – $36,040
  10. North Dakota – $35,510

Nursing Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $24,300
  2. Mississippi – $24,400
  3. Alabama – $25,600
  4. Arkansas – $26,550
  5. Oklahoma – $27,220
  6. Missouri – $27,720
  7. South Carolina – $27,760
  8. North Carolina – $27,800
  9. Tennessee – $27,940
  10. Kentucky – $27,980

Pharmacy Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,620
  2. Alaska – $46,430
  3. Washington – $46,400
  4. District of Columbia – $46,240
  5. Oregon – $43,410
  6. Hawaii – $42,300
  7. North Dakota – $41,390
  8. Minnesota – $39,770
  9. Nevada – $39,390
  10. Wyoming – $39,330

Pharmacy Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Kentucky – $30,370
  2. Alabama – $30,980
  3. Arkansas – $31,010
  4. Pennsylvania – $31,760
  5. West Virginia – $31,890
  6. Georgia – $32,160
  7. Ohio – $32,520
  8. Oklahoma – $32,900
  9. North Carolina – $33,300
  10. Missouri – $33,670

Phlebotomists – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,230
  2. New York – $44,630
  3. District of Columbia – $43,960
  4. Alaska – $43,270
  5. Washington – $42,530
  6. Massachusetts – $42,030
  7. Connecticut – $41,170
  8. Oregon – $40,560
  9. Delaware – $40,520
  10. Maryland – $40,300

Phlebotomists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $29,050
  2. Louisiana – $30,600
  3. Arkansas – $31,120
  4. Oklahoma – $31,400
  5. Mississippi – $31,640
  6. Missouri – $31,830
  7. Kentucky – $32,190
  8. Tennessee – $32,210
  9. Maine – $32,380
  10. Iowa – $32,430

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $95,010
  2. Hawaii – $82,990
  3. District of Columbia – $82,270
  4. Alaska – $79,330
  5. Massachusetts – $78,830
  6. Washington – $77,310
  7. Oregon – $76,520
  8. Rhode Island – $74,670
  9. New York – $73,150
  10. Connecticut – $72,470

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $47,300
  2. Mississippi – $48,100
  3. Arkansas – $52,290
  4. Tennessee – $53,030
  5. Kentucky – $53,090
  6. Iowa – $53,400
  7. Louisiana – $53,610
  8. West Virginia – $53,690
  9. South Dakota – $54,610
  10. Kansas – $55,770

Surgical Technologists – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $67,120
  2. Nevada – $67,000
  3. California – $64,570
  4. Connecticut – $62,310
  5. District of Columbia – $61,620
  6. Minnesota – $61,300
  7. Washington – $60,450
  8. Oregon – $59,480
  9. Rhode Island – $59,410
  10. New York – $59,380

Surgical Technologists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $38,660
  2. West Virginia – $39,890
  3. Mississippi – $41,520
  4. Louisiana – $42,140
  5. Arkansas – $42,390
  6. Iowa – $43,780
  7. South Carolina – $43,880
  8. Kentucky – $44,180
  9. Tennessee – $44,540
  10. South Dakota – $44,700

Ready to start your search for a higher paying healthcare job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapy’s Most In-Demand Roles

Despite being majorly impacted by the pandemic, healthcare employment is rebounding at a steady clip. What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now, and where?

As the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in April of 2020, despite being, arguably, the most needed and relevant industry, healthcare accounted for approximately 6.8% of the more than 20 million jobs lost in the U.S. during that time.

Fast forward to present day, and healthcare is rebounding at a steady clip. Despite the current overall unemployment rate being 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare has dropped to only 3.1%. Healthcare has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when it added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

1. Speech-Language Pathologist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 30%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida
View All SLP Jobs →

2. Physical Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 22.2%
Most Needed In: California, Florida, Texas, Georgia, and New York
View All PT Jobs →

3. Occupational Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 18.4%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, Florida, and New York
View All OT Jobs →

4. Respiratory Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 16.1%
Most Needed In: Ohio, Texas, Florida, Michigan, and Georgia
View All RT Jobs →

5. Physical Therapist Assistant

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 7.3%
Most Needed In: California, New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Connecticut
View All PTA Jobs →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare’s 5 Most In-Demand Roles, Specialties, & Locations

Unemployment in healthcare is now only 3.1% and the industry has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months. What healthcare professionals are needed the most, and where?

In April of 2020, as COVID-19 spread rapidly through our country, the unemployment rate reached 14.8%—the highest rate observed since data collection began in 1948.

Despite being, arguably, the most needed professionals in the country during an unprecedented health emergency, the healthcare industry accounted for 6.8% of jobs lost during that time, with employment in the field declining by 1.4 million.

Over a year later, though, one could say healthcare is booming, yet again. Despite the overall unemployment rate currently sitting at 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare is now only 3.1%. The industry has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when the industry added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of healthcare professionals are needed the most? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

5 Most In-Demand Position Types:

  1. Registered Nurse
  2. Technologist/Technician
  3. Certified Nursing Assistant
  4. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
  5. Physician

5 Most In-Demand Specialties:

  1. Insurance
  2. Education
  3. Patient Care
  4. Customer Service
  5. Rehabilitation

5 Most In-Demand Locations:

  1. California
  2. Texas
  3. New York
  4. Georgia
  5. Pennsylvania

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

4 Ways to Spring Clean for Your Job Search

Spring is, traditionally, one of the best times to make a career move. Here’s how to spring clean for your job search, and get growing elsewhere.

Spring has arrived, and for many, it has brought with it a mindset of growth, change, and new beginnings. It is also, traditionally, one of the best times to make a career move, with employers eager to lock in and onboard new hires before Memorial Day. If you find that you are no longer blooming where you are currently planted, it may be time to set down new roots. Here’s how to spring clean for your job search, and get growing elsewhere.

Weed Out What You Don’t Want

The last year has been hard for many, especially those who work in healthcare. Take stock of what you do and do not want, and what you will and will not accept, especially in terms of your career, and figure out what roles might align with this mindset. If you have been in a demanding patient-facing role, maybe look into what non-clinical roles might be a good fit for you. Or if you have been working in a high-volume hospital, maybe it’s time to consider making a shift to a more rural setting, or into private practice. Bored with your specialty? It might be time to retrain in another. Get out of the weeds, and give yourself a chance to grow in a role better suited for you.

Tidy Up Your Resume

Once you know what you are looking for, it’s time to dust off the ol’ resume. Make sure all of the information on your resume, social media, and job search profiles is current (and, regarding social media, appropriate), and that it properly reflects what you are looking for in your next role. This article we shared at the start of the year is a great place to pick up some tips on how to revamp your resume. And, of course, we recommend you update your profile on HealthJobsNationwide.com, as well.

Branch Out via Your Network

Learning to ask for help isn’t always easy, but when it comes to your job search, it can make all the difference. “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know,” is a popular saying for a reason, and so is, “more hands make light work.” Reach out to those in your network and let them know you are on the hunt for a new opportunity. You may be surprised by just how willing your friends, old and new, will be to help you, and who they may know that you may not. Someone in-the-know could connect you to a decision maker in a more personal way than if you just applied online, or you may be able to find out about a job before it is posted, putting you at an advantage. Take the time to make new connections on social media (or in person, if you’re comfortable), and use those connections to your benefit. And be sure to take out the trash, too, while you’re at it, cutting ties with any toxic people in your life who aren’t rooting for you to win.

Nurture Yourself

Searching for a new job is not always easy. Despite demand for healthcare professionals being higher than most other industries, that does not mean there isn’t healthy competition. You may not land your dream job right away, forcing you to stay in a less satisfying role or remain unemployed. While that certainly is not ideal, it is imperative that you not get discouraged and be kind to yourself during the process. Clear out your negative thoughts, practice good self care, and rest when you need to. Nothing blooms the same day it is planted. Give it time.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Winter Blues? Here Are Healthcare Jobs in Warm Locales.

If this weather has you dreaming of warmer locales, here are the 5 cities with the warmest average temps in February, and their most in-demand healthcare jobs.

This month, a record-breaking deep freeze impacted most of the United States, leaving more than 70% of the lower 48 states blanketed in snow and millions without power. If this weather has you dreaming of warmer locales, here are the five cities with the warmest average temperatures in February, and the most in-demand healthcare jobs in each location, according to data from our job board.

1. Miami, FL

Average Temperature in February: 70.0°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Respiratory Therapist
3. Physician
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Dental Assistant
Search All Jobs in Miami, FL →

2. Palm Springs, CA

Average Temperature in February: 64.5°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Physician
3. Speech Language Pathologist
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physical Therapist
Search All Jobs in Palm Springs, CA →

3. Tampa, FL

Average Temperature in February: 63.2°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
3. Certified Nursing Assistant
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physician
Search All Jobs in Tampa, FL →

4. Phoenix, AZ

Average Temperature in February: 59.8°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Medical Assistant
3. Certified Nursing Assistant
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physical Therapist
Search All Jobs in Phoenix, AZ →

5. Los Angeles, CA

Average Temperature in February: 58.9°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Physician
3. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
4. Speech Language Pathologist
5. Nurse Practitioner
Search All Jobs in Los Angeles, CA →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.