Innovative Healthcare Careers Sparked by Evidence-Based Practice

Healthcare is constantly evolving to keep up with the most scientifically supported approaches to achieving good patient outcomes. Evidence-based practice is a concept that fully embraces that essential healthcare truth. Every patient is an individual and every individual requires personalized considerations when making health-related decisions.

In this article, we take a look at what evidence-based practice is, how it works, and what careers use it.

What is Evidence-Based Practice?

One would hope the phrase is a bit of a redundancy—at least in this context. What is healthcare work, after all, if not evidence-based? While doctors and nurses have always leveraged their training and factual understanding of medicine to achieve the best possible healthcare outcomes, they haven’t and don’t always apply the “evidence-based” approach being described here.

Evidence-based healthcare is a very specific research-centric process in which care providers identify a clinical problem or question and take steps to investigate and address it. It’s time-consuming because it is very individualized. The “clinical problem,” is not necessarily transferable.

If two patients come in with congestive heart failure, the evidence-based research cycle may take place for both of them because there are other variables that will influence their outcome.

Because evidence-based practice is very research-demanding in an industry that often has little to nothing to spare it is not always applied consistently. However, it has been shown to produce good results, both for individual patients and in the way healthcare providers think about the services that they offer.

While there aren’t a lot of careers born specifically out of evidence-based practice, there are many that have been influenced by it.

It is now a concept that is taught both in nursing and medical school. It is particularly prominent in advanced curriculums. For example, if you wish to become a:

  • Family Nurse Practitioner
  • Neo-Natal Nurse Practitioner
  • Nurse Midwife
  • Gerontological Nurse

You will probably deal routinely with evidence-based practice. Unfortunately, because it is a very demanding practice, it isn’t a solution that hospitals can leverage in all situations. However, it remains a desirable framework through which healthcare providers can filter and inform their decisions.

Informatics Nursing

Informatics nurses work primarily with numbers. They record and process healthcare data as a way to better strategize for individual patients and to provide broader solutions that can influence a hospital’s overall operations.

They are an enormous resource when it comes to maximizing efficiency. Hospitals that are short-staffed or not funded adequately can make the most of what resources they do have by understanding their numbers.

While informatics nursing has existed for years, it is a career path that evolves constantly and is more prominent than ever now that AI and other data-processing tools have made it more accessible.

Informatics nursing was not born of evidence-based practice but it certainly operates in the same arena, providing hospitals with the tools required to leverage factually-supported decisions.

What is the Quickest Way to Become a Nurse?

If you are interested in joining the world of healthcare, you are probably wondering—what is the quickest way to become a nurse? Nursing is a very popular career pivot because you can get certified relatively quickly—particularly if you already have a college degree.

People heading to college for the first time will often need to deal with pre-requisite classes that significantly increase the time and money they spend on school. If you have your degree, you can skip those requirements and enter an “accelerated program.”

Just how accelerated that program is will depend largely on your capacity, and what opportunities are available near you. Often, people who are able to fully commit may complete their educational requirements in 12-18 months. From there, you just need to pass the NCLEX—nursing’s big, bad, standardized test—to get a job in the world of healthcare.

If you are interested in a more advanced nursing career— for example, one that requires a graduate degree— you may still be able to “bundle,” your education in a direct-to-hire package. These curriculums are designed to allow students to complete their undergraduate and graduate work in a self-contained period, sometimes shorter than getting just an undergraduate degree would have been.

It takes most people 6-7 years of college to get their undergraduate and graduate degrees. Through an accelerated program, people who already have their undergraduate degree may be able to do everything in around three years.

This opens a lot of doors, both in terms of salary expectations and in the job that you will ultimately be qualified for. Many times, nurses who want to specialize in very specific fields must get their master’s degree to do it.

There are so many paths to becoming a healthcare worker. Research what opportunities are available to you, and figure out the strategy that feels most accessible. The key is to strike a balance between efficiency and quality of life. Everyone is a little bit different in terms of how they do with school work, and accelerated programs are—well. Accelerated. Choose the pace that works for you.

As a future healthcare worker, avoiding burnout will be just as important a skill as anything they teach you in nursing school.

Conclusion

Evidence-based care practices are just one of the many modern concepts influencing the direction of healthcare. Digital technology, for example, is shaping the field as much as anything else. Hospitals all over the country are looking for administrators and even doctors and nurses with a good grip on software solutions that can help improve patient outcomes and improve efficiency.

There are tons of ways to get into healthcare. Find the career that suits your interests, skills, and passions, and go from there.


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How Will Increased Remote Work in Healthcare Impact Both Employees and Patients?

Some jobs just can’t be done from home. Teachers do their best work in classrooms surrounded by students. Salespeople continue to value the personal face-to-face relationships that fuel their success. And try ordering a cappuccino from a barista who is working from home.

For a long time, it was assumed that healthcare workers fell into this same category of employment. They had to go into their workplace because that’s where all the patients are, right?

It turns out, there are a lot of tasks nurses and other healthcare professionals can do from home. In this article, we take a look at the rise of remote work in the world of healthcare.

Who Gets to Work From Home?

Hospitals have enormous administrative staffs. When you drive past a city hospital that is tall enough to poke at the moon, it’s natural to wonder just how many people are sick in this town. Is it safe to even be here?

Fear not! While much of this large hypothetical building is dedicated to patient care, an equally large portion of it may be serving an administrative function. Desk work that can just as readily be done from home.

Many are surprised to learn that nurses, doctors, and nurse practitioners are also getting the opportunity to work more from home. No, that doesn’t mean seeing patients in their dining rooms.

“Frontline healthcare workers,” as they are often called do not only see patients. That is an important part of their jobs, but they also do a lot on their computers, documenting details and performing other paperwork requirements.

A recent study found that nurses working twelve-hour shifts often only spend a quarter of that time in patient rooms. The rest of the time they are parked in front of the keyboard.

The implication of this figure is complicated. Just because nurses aren’t always in patient rooms does not necessarily mean they aren’t needed on their floors.

Healthcare workers know all too well that things on the job are peaceful— until they aren’t. When patients need help, they can’t wait.

Most hospitals don’t have the option to significantly reduce their staffing assignments to allow for more at-home work.

However, they do have the option to play around with “flex hours,” letting those who can complete some of their work at home under more flexible circumstances.

Below, we take a look at how this might impact healthcare.

Improved Productivity

The technology that allows people to work from home has existed for a long time. Working from home failed to catch on during the early stages of the Internet partially because many worried it would harm productivity.

After several years of almost standardized remote work, it’s safe to say that the productivity myth has been thoroughly debunked.

In many cases, people actually get more done at home than they did at the workplace. Offices—or hospitals as the case may be— are full of small but potent productivity killers. Desk conversations. Meetings that could have been emails. And we can’t forget the commute.

Most people spend thirty minutes each way just driving to their jobs.

Remote work can and often does cut the fat out of a person’s work routine. For healthcare workers, this means that they will have more time and energy to devote to the important aspects of their job— choices that directly influence patient outcomes.

Easier Recruitment

The potential to work from home is still a rare and enticing benefit in healthcare. Consider this development from the perspective of a rural hospital that has struggled to fully staff its floors. They simply can’t convince new nurses to move out into the country for a job when they could just as easily find work closer to home.

But if they could leverage a hybrid schedule in their recruitment efforts? This may be enough of an enticement to win over members of a generation who are more focused on work/life balance than any other employment consideration.

Improved Job Satisfaction

That’s the ultimate goal of hybrid work schedules. Today’s employers are constantly competing on quality of life grounds because that’s what modern employees want— and because it is often cheaper than leveraging higher salaries.

The remote work movement has been generally well-received in how it provides people with improved work/life balance.

Improving job satisfaction for doctors and nurses can go a long way toward reducing unsustainable turnover numbers.

Potential Problems

Remote work hasn’t been perfect. Common issues include technical difficulties—if a person’s WIFI cuts out, that simple issue can kill an entire day’s worth of productivity— loneliness, and balancing the schedules of people who live in all different parts of the world.

Most of these major remote work issues don’t pertain to the hybrid work environment that most healthcare facilities are implementing.

That doesn’t mean that remote work in healthcare will be painless. It’s new and “new,” often means challenging.

However, the circumstances for a successful rollout are certainly present.

How Will Patients Be Impacted?

All of the benefits described above should trickle down to patients. Burnout is a very real problem and one that can have a MAJOR impact on job performance. When doctors and nurses feel less stress, they will almost always engage more effectively at work.

This can have a very big impact on future patient outcomes.

Why Now?

Healthcare shortages are still very real. The United States labor market has seen wages cool off as the economy finally rebounds completely from Covid. Hospitals that were offering sometimes fairly large salary increases to attract new employees have largely stepped back from that strategy.

They need to leverage incentives to attract employees and the potential to work from home is a (relatively) easy way to do that.

It’s also an effective one. Burnout is such a major cause of turnover and remote work can help alleviate it.

Wage stagnation certainly should not be the consequence of this move, but if hospitals want to find more ways to entice doctors and nurses to stick around, this is a good way to do it.

The benefits will undoubtedly be passed down to the patients as well.

Less burnout means less stress. Less stress typically means better patient outcomes. Right now, remote work seems like an effective way to address so many of the issues plaguing Western healthcare.


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Why Emergency Room Roles are in High Demand

Did you know? Healthcare is the fastest-growing field in the United States. This declaration comes to us straight from the horse’s mouth. The Bureau of Labor Statistics published findings in the summer of 2023 that indicated doctors and nurses would be in high demand for the next ten years.

This information isn’t radically surprising for anyone who has been paying attention to the news. During Covid-19 we couldn’t stop hearing about how hospitals didn’t have the staff to handle the enormous increase in patient loads.

Last year, an ER nurse made national news after calling emergency services to request backup help. There hadn’t been a bus crash that sent 90 people to the hospital all at once. They simply didn’t have enough staff to cover a normal Saturday evening.

What is contributing to these shortages, and how can the demand for doctors and nurses be seen as an opportunity?

What’s Going On?

While it’s tempting to lay the healthcare shortage at Covid’s feet— you couldn’t ask for a better villain when explaining a problem— the truth is a little more complicated than that. Healthcare shortages have been forecasted for more than a decade.

Analysts have been sounding the alarm as more and more nurses retire or leave the profession for different work, while not enough new nurses come up through the ranks to replace them.

Healthcare was already in a vulnerable state when the pandemic came along to shape things up. Today, we are still dealing with the ramifications of those combined factors.

To make matters worse, there still hasn’t been a solution to healthcare’s primary problem: high turnover.

Nursing jobs are very hard. Emotionally. Physically. Mentally. Most nurses work twelve-hour shifts, even though studies indicate that the average person only has enough mental gas in the tank to produce four hours of sustained concentration per day.

That, of course, does not mean that a person is useless after they hit their peak. It does mean their efforts will be a matter of diminishing returns.

Eight hours is quite a bit of diminishing returns.

Even after years of healthcare shortages, the industry has not come up with a comprehensive response to the problem.

What could help correct healthcare shortages?

Quality of Life Considerations

About half of all nurses leave the profession within three years of starting. That’s a disastrous ratio that very directly reflects on the experience most healthcare professionals encounter on the job. What about working as a nurse drives so many people away?

  • The shifts are long.
  • The hours cover holidays, evenings, and weekends.
  • The work is brutal.

Most nurses work cripplingly long hours. They see hard things on the job, and they often become isolated from their friends and family based on the hours they keep. It’s hard to connect with your loved ones when you are exhausted all the time and going to bed when they wake up.

Some hospitals are trying to correct this by providing mental health resources and revamping their scheduling practices to make the job more sustainable.
These steps are still very much a work in progress, but they are making things a little bit easier for nurses all over the country.

How This Benefits You

If you are considering getting a job as a nurse, now is a good time to do it. It’s true that the work is not easy. It’s also true that many of the issues described in the earlier paragraphs are far from resolved. Many hospitals have not made any significant headway on improving quality of life-considerations for their nursing staff.

Even those who have can’t do anything about the emotionally challenging aspects of the work. Nursing is a hard job and it is always going to take a special type of person to do it. If you can dedicate yourself to helping others, if you can accept the fact that you’ll constantly witness human tragedy at work only to be sent home to live an ordinary life (it’s hard to sit down to dinner with your family after watching someone die, but nurses do it every day) nursing might be the right job for you.

Here are a few reasons why now is a particularly good time.

  • It’s a seller’s market: Many hospitals are offering signing bonuses and other incentives to attract new nurses. While it’s not a job known for its perks, now is a good time to apply a little bit of leverage to the hiring process.
  • You won’t have any trouble finding work: There have been times when nurses have had a hard time finding jobs. It’s not that we have had a major nursing surplus in recent years. Rather, it’s always been a logistic problem. Regardless of the overall state of employment, every town only needs a set number of nurses. When they hit that number it could be years before the local hospital system needs to make a new hire. While that is still a problem in some parts of the country, the dynamic has shifted hard in the other direction. Now, most hospitals need help and a nurse seeking employment today should have no trouble getting their desired placement.
  • The culture is changing: Slowly but surely, the healthcare worker culture is shifting in a more sustainable direction. Some hospitals are implementing flex scheduling and other quality-of-life considerations that are helping nurses avoid burnout and stay on the job for longer.

If you are interested in becoming a nurse but don’t know what steps to take, there are plenty of resources available to help.

Choosing the Right Nursing School

Here is a quick cheat sheet that should help you find a good nursing school program for your needs.

  • Consider online classes: While nursing has a very obvious and inextricable hands-on component, you can complete much of your educational requirements from home. Remote learning provides a flexible learning environment— particularly for people who are already working or raising a family.
  • Consider accelerated curriculums: If you don’t want to wait four years to start working as a nurse, you can get your qualifications completed much quicker with an accelerated program. While they do require a lot of work, they allow you to meet your requirements within 18 months.
  • Understand your options: If you already have a degree you can skip your gen-ed requirements and get certified as a nurse much quicker. It’s another great way to accelerate your career.

Ready to get started? Begin looking into nursing programs today so that you can make a meaningful and much-needed contribution toward the future of healthcare.


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Medical Marketing and Digital Obstacles Faced By Physicians

The mission of medicine is, of course, to help and to heal. But the practice of medicine is also an entrepreneurial endeavor. Clinics are also businesses, and to continue fulfilling the medical mission of caring for patients and families, they must be profitable.

That means healthcare systems and medical facilities are just like any other business insofar as they need effective marketing to help them grow and thrive. However, when it comes to marketing, healthcare practices face unique challenges.

Building Trust

Given the very real life-or-death consequences that apply in the healthcare industry, healthcare marketing must always be undertaken with a degree of gravity. Healthcare consumers may distrust clinicians who appear frivolous or cavalier in promoting their practices.

Thus, the onus is on healthcare marketers to overcome any initial reluctance the target audience may feel about healthcare marketing. Consumers may, at first, resist the idea of a healthcare provider advertising on social media, through email, or on television and radio.

However, if your content is strong and your tone earnest and professional, you will likely be able to leave a positive impression on your audience. This is especially true if you use your content strategically to provide valuable information that health consumers want and need.

For instance, you may use your website, blog, and social media accounts not only to provide information on your medical services but also to educate your audience on health topics or offer free advice. In this way, you build your reputation as a trusted authority and go-to resource for information relating to disease prevention and management, mental health, wellness, and related concerns.

Best of all, as you develop content that boosts your practice’s reputation, you’re going to be improving your search engine optimization (SEO) at the same time. The more credible your content and brand, the greater the likelihood that you will satisfy Google’s rigorous E-E-A-T algorithm and, thus, land a prime spot on a search engine results page.

Tailoring Content to Audience Needs

Another significant challenge in healthcare marketing is the burden of tailoring content to the needs of the target audience. In many cases, healthcare systems and clinics serve a vast patient demographic, treating patients of all ages, ethnicities, genders, and socioeconomic groups.

That means that market segmentation can be tough, especially if you’re a small practice with a limited marketing budget and a small marketing team. The good news, though, is that with a little creativity in your content development, you can reach people without either spending a king’s ransom or resorting to a scattershot approach that doesn’t really target any audience.

The wide variety and immense reach of today’s digital platforms means that you can affordably access a broad audience, using the media that will best suit the desired market segment. The key is to leverage every tool you can from the digital marketer’s toolbox, including email marketing, long-form blogs, videos, and podcasts.

As you do so, you must understand exactly who you are targeting through each channel. For example, millennials and Generation Z are more likely to engage with and respond to social media and video content than their older counterparts may be.

On the other hand, Generation X and baby boomers may prefer long-form content, direct emails, and podcasts, as well as traditional media channels, such as television and radio ads.

This can certainly get confusing, especially as you’re organizing publication dates and other important milestones in the meantime. To make the process more efficient, use different methods like process visualization. This provides visuals to the content publication calendar and breaks down each step. With it, you can focus on making your content more substantial rather than worrying about the minor anxieties that come with the process.

As you identify the media that will best reach each target segment, you will then want to align the content, from subject matter to presentation style, to the expectations of that segment.

Leveraging Online Reviews (Even Bad Ones)

One of the most important things you can do as a medical marketer is to cultivate a sense of community between clinicians, patients, families, and prospective patients. Building thriving online discussion forums, including soliciting patient reviews, is an ideal way to do this.

Inviting these reviews, though, means that there will inevitably be the occasional negative review. And while negative reviews can certainly be upsetting, they do not have to damage your clinic’s reputation.

Indeed, you can transform negative reviews into positive factors for your practice. This is because negative reviews often provide an invaluable opportunity to learn and improve in your practice. The information you glean from your patient’s complaints can be used to resolve service issues in the front office and deficiencies in care within your clinical team.

These practical improvements may then be integrated into your digital marketing. How you respond to negative reviews can be a powerful tool for not only mitigating the potential damage of a patient complaint but also for turning the complaint into a benefit. When audiences see that you react to negative reviews with respect, concern, and a sincere effort to resolve the issue, they’re likely to end up trusting and engaging with you even more.

Evaluate Your Marketing Efforts Afterward

The key downfall of many medical practices when initiating a new marketing strategy is setting it and forgetting it. If you’re not actively keeping tabs open on your marketing efforts and how they’re being received by potential patients, all your work up to this point would be wasted. The true question is: how will you continually evaluate your progress?

You can do this in a variety of ways. For one, qualitative methods should be relatively easy as a practitioner — you can give patients a survey when they first visit to ask how they found you initially. Even sparking conversations wouldn’t hurt with the right patient.

However, quantitative methods may give you a better overall picture of your progress. You’ll need to look for the right key performance indicators (KPIs), though. KPIs like revenue growth and customer acquisition are not only great indicators for your practice’s overall health, but they can also help you decide if your marketing efforts are doing any good or not.

Once you do your research, you can analyze the results and decide how you would like to regroup from there.

The Takeaway

Although there are always things you can do to improve your medical marketing, know that few practitioners get it right the first time. There is a reason you went to medical school rather than obtaining a degree in communications or marketing, after all.

However, understanding the various obstacles that arise and knowing how to overcome them can help physicians and marketers alike achieve exceptional growth. Effective medical marketing, indeed, is essential to cultivating a strong brand and building thriving relationships with patients, families, and healthcare consumers.

 


 Katie Brenneman is a passionate writer specializing in lifestyle, mental health, activism-related content. When she isn’t writing, you can find her with her nose buried in a book or hiking with her dog, Charlie. To connect with Katie, you can follow her on Twitter. 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Shaping the Future: How to Embark on a Career as a Nursing Educator

Nurses play an important role in society, there is no question about that. They are the backbone of the medical industry, making up a significant number of the workforce responsible for the care and attention to patients. For those that have chosen such a career there are plenty of avenues by which to expand upon that knowledge and experience. One of those is becoming a Nursing Educator.

There has been much discussion over the last decade or so about the quickly expanding need for more nurse practitioners in clinical settings and healthcare professionals. There is already a notable shortage of nurses compared to the projections needed to adequately care for the quickly aging Baby Boomer generation.

While those numbers are near common knowledge among colleges and medical institutions, there seems to be less vocality around the need for nursing educators, which is ironic considering that you can’t have more nurses without an adequate number or people to train them. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) states that there is a current rate of 8.8% openings, vacancies for nursing educators and these numbers are expected to keep on climbing due to impending retirement rates. Disconcertingly, nearly one third of all currently employed nursing educators in bachelor programs are projected to retire by the year 2025.

So, if education and nursing are mutual interests, it may be a sound choice for the future. Here is how to begin a career path to becoming a nursing educator. But first, let’s consider what a nursing educator is and does.

What is a Nursing Educator?

Nurse Educators, also known as nurse instructors, are registered nurses (RN’s) who have gone on in the education and experience levels to support the training and education of those persons who would like to become nurses themselves. As with any teaching curriculum, nurse educators will be required to teach, guide, report, and sometimes create their own lesson plans in a variety of environments.

Nurse educators are, along with other educators in the program, responsible for the development and guidance of students. The preparation of those students equips them to sit for the NCLEX-RN exam— the test that all prospective nursing students need to take before they are certified to work in professional environments.

Nurse educators work in conjunction with other faculty members at primary and secondary institutions such as medical research hospitals, health-care facilities, and sometimes private research companies so as to stay up to date on what emerging nurses may need to know to be well equipped for their professional roles.

Additionally, nurse educators can double their time in clinical settings acting as supervisors for nursing students or RNs in training. Nurse educators are not only teachers but can stand as mentors for students as well.

How to Become Nursing Educator

Before pursuing this career course, it is important to consider the necessary steps needed to become a nursing educator. Nurse educators, depending on who is doing the hiring, will have different requirements. The minimum is a valid RN license and two years of experience as an RN. Many educators will work about three to five years before making the transition into a teaching position.

While most nursing educator positions will require a Master of Science in nursing in addition to a few years’ experience, there are some places that are willing to overlook a master’s degree in exchange for many years of experience, great references, and evidence of competency in supervision and training of others.

So, typically speaking, the correct order of completion to become a nurse educator is to complete an undergraduate degree such as a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, passing the NCLEX, serving as a nurse for a few years, and then feeling out whether education in this field is still desirable. From there, interested parties should enroll in a nurse educator program such as a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN).

For those of different ambitions, going on to complete a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) or a Doctorate of Education (Ed. D) should be considered. While not required for teaching at an undergraduate level, it is generally sought after for those who would teach at the graduate level as a tenured professor or school administrator.


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Take a Career Rejection and Make an Opportunity

Career rejection, a common aspect of professional life, presents unique opportunities for growth and resilience. This HealthJobsNationwide article details strategies to leverage these setbacks as constructive steps forward, promoting resilience in your professional journey. As a healthcare professional, embracing these challenges as learning experiences can significantly enhance your adaptability and problem-solving skills — essential in any professional path.

Prioritize Self-Care During Job Searches

In the demanding realm of healthcare, facing job rejections can be particularly disheartening. It’s essential to prioritize self-care by engaging in activities that revitalize your spirit, whether it’s pursuing hobbies, exercising, or spending quality time with loved ones. Such practices are crucial for maintaining mental and emotional equilibrium, enabling you to navigate your job search in the healthcare industry with renewed vigor and a positive outlook. Keeping a healthy balance between professional pursuits and personal well-being during this time is key to preventing burnout and preserving an optimistic perspective on your journey.

Enhance Your Resume

Improving your resume after a career rejection is a crucial step toward future success, acting as a reflective process that allows you to reassess and enhance your skills and experiences. It provides an opportunity to address any gaps or weaknesses that may have contributed to the rejection, making your profile more appealing to potential employers. By updating your resume, you also keep it relevant in a constantly evolving job market, ensuring that your qualifications match the current needs and trends of your industry. This proactive approach demonstrates resilience and a commitment to personal growth, qualities highly valued by employers, thereby increasing your chances of success.

Grow Your Professional Network

For healthcare professionals, building a strong network is key to uncovering hidden opportunities in the industry. Engaging in medical conferences, participating in healthcare-focused LinkedIn groups, and seeking informational interviews are effective strategies for establishing crucial connections and discovering job vacancies. This networking not only facilitates career advancement by providing insights into healthcare trends but also emphasizes the importance of reconnecting with peers through alumni sites. Such platforms offer a unique avenue for rekindling old friendships and professional acquaintances, further enriching one’s professional network and opportunities within the healthcare landscape.

Embrace Continuous Learning

In an era where change is the only constant, the pursuit of continuous learning stands as the cornerstone of personal and professional development. It empowers us to remain adaptable, innovative, and forward-thinking in a landscape that demands nothing less. By committing to lifelong education, we not only enhance our own skill sets and knowledge but also contribute to the growth and vibrancy of our communities. Let’s embrace the journey of continuous learning, for in doing so, we pave the way for a future replete with possibilities and achievements.

Craft Tailored Cover Letters

Avoid generic cover letters. Research each company and role, tailoring your letter to demonstrate how your skills align with their needs. Understanding the organization’s values can significantly increase your chances of standing out. This approach shows potential employers that you have a genuine interest in their company and know what they’re looking for in a candidate.

Develop In-Demand Skills

In the healthcare industry, it’s crucial to concentrate on enhancing skills that are pivotal to your field. Engage in online medical courses, attend healthcare workshops, and participate in specialized training programs to master skills sought after by healthcare employers. Keeping abreast of the latest medical trends, technologies, and practices showcases your dedication to continuous learning and your ability to adapt to a rapidly evolving healthcare environment.

Consider Entrepreneurship

If traditional healthcare career paths seem limited or unsatisfying, exploring entrepreneurship within the healthcare sector could be a valuable alternative. Launching your own healthcare startup or engaging in freelance medical consultancy puts you in control, allowing you to leverage your specialized skills and innovative ideas to carve out a unique professional journey. This approach not only offers flexibility and independence but also encourages creative problem-solving and substantial personal development. Embarking on a healthcare entrepreneurship venture can be an immensely gratifying way to make a direct and meaningful impact in the field, enabling you to contribute novel solutions and influence healthcare practices with your vision and expertise.

 

Career rejection should be viewed as an opportunity for learning and improvement. Seek feedback, engage in professional development, cultivate a growth mindset, remain persistent, seek mentorship, and consider volunteering or internships. Each setback is a chance to refine your approach and get closer to your career goals. Stay resilient and focused, and approach your career trajectory with confidence. Remember that every rejection is a step forward in understanding and shaping your professional journey.

Embark on your next career adventure in healthcare by exploring a wide range of job opportunities at HealthJobsNationwide. Create your future in a field that makes a difference; start your search today and join the healthcare professionals shaping the future of medicine.


Julie Morris is a freelance writer based out of Boston, MA. She writes most often on health is a life and career coach. She thrives on helping others live their best lives. It’s easy for her to relate to clients who feel run over by life because she’s been there. After years in a successful (but unfulfilling) career in finance, Julie busted out of the corner office that had become her prison.

Today, she is fulfilled by helping busy professionals like her past self get the clarity they need in order to live inspired lives that fill more than just their bank accounts. When Julie isn’t working with clients, she enjoys writing and is currently working on her first book. She also loves spending time outdoors and getting lost in a good book.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

 

Stress, Stamina, and Service: Exploring Healthcare’s Most Demanding Jobs

Healthcare workers are some of the most commendable and hard-working professionals in modern-day society. From dealing with high-pressure situations on a daily basis to picking up the slack caused by professional shortages in the industry, these professionals put their own health, safety, and well-being on the line to perform admirable tasks.

However, not all healthcare worker roles are created equal. Unfortunately, some specific healthcare professionals have to endure some of the most difficult experiences in their roles.

Gaining a clearer perspective on which healthcare positions are the most difficult and demanding can provide one with a deeper appreciation of these commendable professionals.

Here is an exploration of healthcare’s most demanding jobs.

Nursing Roles

While many are aware that nurses have a difficult job, far fewer realize just how strenuous and stressful these jobs can be.

In nursing, there are a variety of roles that these professionals can step into. These include roles such as advanced practice nursing roles and registered nursing roles. When it comes to these specific nursing roles, each one comes with its own unique challenges and obstacles that professionals must overcome on a consistent basis.

Here are some of the most demanding nursing roles in the current healthcare landscape.

Registered Nurses

Registered nurses can be seen as the backbone of the modern American healthcare system. From assessing patients to administering medication to educating those they treat; these healthcare professionals are kept busy from the moment they clock into work.

The wide variety of technical tasks and the high-pressure situations that nurses find themselves in on a consistent basis are some of the reasons that this is such a demanding role.

Sadly, in today’s evolving world, this isn’t the only reason that these professionals have such difficult jobs.

Today, there is currently a massive nursing shortage that is affecting scores of medical facilities across the nation. As a result of this shortage, nurses now have to pick up the slack and perform more tasks than they really should need to.

The combination of already difficult tasks with understaffed working environments makes the roles of these professionals exceedingly difficult. For this reason, many would-be nurses are foregoing obtaining their nursing licenses because of the increasingly demanding nature of registered nurse roles.

Travel Nurses

Travel nurses are one specific subset of nurses that can have a particularly grueling professional life. In essence, these are highly skilled nurses who travel to various locations across the country to help different medical institutions address their nursing shortages.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, travel nurses played a key role in ensuring that patients across the country received the care they needed. Unfortunately, despite the importance of these healthcare professionals to the healthcare ecosystem, they work in incredibly difficult professional environments.

Given the nature of their role, travel nurses are constantly working in understaffed facilities. Typically, these hospitals are incredibly busy and hectic, increasing travel nurses’ risk of developing symptoms of stress, anxiety, and burnout.

If this wasn’t enough, travel nurses must also constantly travel to different locations across the country. This can make it difficult to maintain a healthy relationship with one’s family and friends, often resulting in feelings of isolation.

For these reasons, travel nurses have some of the most grueling and demanding careers in healthcare. However, it must be noted that because of the unique and difficult nature of the travel nurse career path, these professionals typically command higher salaries than their registered nurse counterparts.

Clinical Psychologists

Clinical psychologists have incredibly demanding jobs that can often take a toll on their personal lives and sense of well-being. However, they are incredibly helpful to countless people, and they play an important and invaluable role in the modern healthcare landscape.

Essentially, clinical psychologists help treat mental health ailments in the patients they serve. While they may enjoy aspects of their jobs, there are many ways in which the role can be incredibly draining and stressful.

When it comes to treating patients, balancing the needs of patients can be extremely difficult. This is especially true for those with more severe mental health ailments. On top of this, having to work with patients through harrowing experiences on a regular basis can also take a huge toll.

Given the draining nature of the clinical psychologist role, this job definitely should be recognized as one of the most demanding careers in healthcare.

Healthcare Professionals Should Be Commended

Nearly every healthcare professional role comes with its fair share of challenges. However, some specific roles are particularly grueling and require professionals to deal with a significant range of obstacles on a regular basis.

Fortunately, there are countless brave and committed professionals out there who step into these roles and strive to help patients. As a society, it is our duty to recognize the sacrifices of these individuals and shower them with the praise and commendation they deserve.


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Comparing Urban and Rural Nursing: Key Differences and Similarities

City nurses and rural nurses have the same job, but the healthcare cities in their respective communities typically have many significant differences. Urban hospitals are overflowing with patients. They experience higher instances of violent crime. During times of viral illness, their infection rates are considerably higher.

Rural hospitals aren’t a walk in the park either. They are understaffed, underresourced, and at the center of many serious health problems as well. Rural America has extremely high rates of opiate addiction, even in minors.

It’s never a walk in the park working at a hospital. If you are a nurse considering which path is right for you, read on as we compare and contrast urban and rural nursing.

A Common Ground

First of all, it is important to understand that rural and urban nurses share the same basic background. Regardless of their location, both began their journey by entering into some sort of program that certified them as an RN.

There isn’t a unique credential for working in the country versus the city. It sounds almost obvious to say but it is a meaningful distinction to bear in mind.

Many people on both sides of the cornfield border assume a degree of separation between city and rural people that doesn’t exist in real life. There are, of course, important cultural differences between the two settings.

However, at the end of the day, we’re talking about people. From a health perspective, as well as a social one, people are pretty much the same wherever you go.

Nice speech Ms. America. Doesn’t that sort of undermind the concept of your article?

Ahem. Yes. Well, while the human element of healthcare does remain consistent between settings, there are experiential differences that are worth exploring. Below, we compare and contrast rural/urban healthcare.

Patient Demographics

One of the most obvious differences between rural and city nursing is the patient demographics. Urban nurses will come across people from all parts of the world. The bigger the city, the more diversity there will most likely be.

In rural settings, there certainly can be some diversity, but the overall demographic tends to be more monolithic.

Why does this matter? Interacting with people from different backgrounds can require more social awareness and sensitivity than is usually required when working with people you share a background with.

As a city nurse, you will need to be willing to understand other people’s cultures and treat them with respect accordingly.

The Urban Advantage

Talk to any nurse working in an urban setting, and “advantage,” probably won’t be the first word they reach for when describing their place of work. Still, compared to rural hospitals, city systems do have significantly better access to resources.

Some of these resources are staffing-related. It’s hard for rural hospitals to find people for the simple reason that they have a much smaller candidate pool to choose from.

It goes deeper than that, though. City hospitals have more access to specialists and advanced treatment technologies. In fact, when rural people are diagnosed with a particularly challenging or sensitive illness, they will often be referred to urban hospitals.

Scope

Piggybacking off that last idea, urban healthcare workers have more of an opportunity to specialize than their rural counterparts. Because they typically have access to more people, it becomes possible to designate specialty groups.

A nurse working on the cardiac floor in an urban hospital may not need to abruptly change lanes into respiratory.

Rural hospitals are the opposite. They have fewer people to work with, so everyone needs to be versatile in their skills.

From a purely third-party perspective, it is difficult to say which arrangement is better. On the one hand, skill diversity is definitely a good thing. On the other hand, it can also be nice to be on the receiving end of highly specialized care.

Community Bonds

One thing rural hospitals typically do better than their urban counterparts? Community building. It’s hard to establish bonds when you are offering care to tens, or even hundreds of thousands of people. In rural hospitals, the patient pool is considerably smaller.

What’s more, there are also fewer hospitals to go around. One rural county might be served by a single hospital. That means everyone in the community is going to the same place when they require healthcare.

Common Cause

We talked a lot about what rural hospitals have versus what urban ones have. The truth is that neither setting has enough. Hospitals all over the country, all over the world, in fact, are struggling to meet basic needs.

Part of this problem is staffing-related. Just last spring an ER nurse in Washington had to call 911 and ask for backup support. The hospital wasn’t trying to process the victims of a large accident. They just didn’t have enough people to deal with a typical shift.

That’s a big problem, but not an uncommon one. It’s also an issue that has been going on for a long time. More nurses are leaving than coming in.

The new arrivals are entering a challenging time in the history of healthcare. Costs are rising. Technology is changing the experience in ways that no one can quite predict. And community distrust of healthcare has reached a high point as many people all over the country struggle to embrace vaccines and other forms of preventative care.

In other words, nursing isn’t easy, regardless of where you find yourself in the world.


Image by Yaroslav Danylchenko on Freepik


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Empowering Patients and Families: The Role of Nurse Practitioners in Palliative Care

The role of a nurse practitioner (NP) offers various types of opportunities and experiences. While many NPs work from doctor’s offices or hospital floors, others focus on more specialized areas. One of these is caring for terminally ill and end-of-life patients as they navigate their palliative journey.

As with so many careers in medicine, being a palliative care NP comes with a range of challenges, demands, and responsibilities. Nevertheless, it can also be a valuable experience in empowering patients and families as they face an emotionally, spiritually, and psychologically significant part of their lives.

Let’s take a closer look at the role of nurse practitioners in palliative care.

Care Planning and Symptom Management

One of the most impactful ways NPs can empower patients and their families is by helping them develop care plans. The last thing many people navigating palliative care want is to have arrangements that affect their lives just dictated to them. Rather, NPs, with their empathetic skill sets and in-depth medical knowledge, can act as expert guides. They provide patients and families with practical advice that both serves medical and emotional needs.

Care planning, by its nature, has to be a meticulous process. After all, terminal illness treatment can be quite complex. NPs can start by making a thorough assessment of the patient’s current health condition. This considers how severe the symptoms of specific illnesses are, but also elements that affect their quality of life, such as range of motion, mobility, and general comfort. NPs can also then discuss what the patient’s palliative journey goals and concerns are.

This is where an NP’s professional and compassionate abilities can be particularly effective. They’ll need to find ways for the medical and personal needs of the patients — and in some instances, the families involved — to meet. If there are problems, such as the side effects of some medications clashing with patients’ quality of life requirements, they discuss the options with the patient. Being transparent about the consequences, challenges, and benefits of different care paths is essential for patients to make informed decisions.

From here, NPs can create a formal document of care and symptom management that is shared with other relevant care staff and specialist medical providers. Importantly, NPs can revisit the plan periodically with patients as their symptoms and preferences develop during their care. This ensures that there’s always a medically robust yet patient-centric approach to delivering services.

Maintaining Mental Wellness

Palliative care is an emotionally and psychologically challenging experience. It’s also important to recognize that there is a growing national mental health crisis. A combination of factors contributes to difficulties here, from the escalating price of psychological health care to the sense of stigma surrounding mental wellness. This may further exacerbate the intense mental and physical impact of the palliative journey. As a result, NPs’ attention and skills are not just directed toward managing patients’ physical symptoms, but also tending to their mental wellness needs.

This can begin with something as simple as regularly checking in with patients about their emotions, thoughts, and concerns. The empathy and compassion NPs bring to their roles can be vital in establishing meaningful connections and trust bonds that encourage patients to share their feelings. In some cases, NPs might act as a bridge between patients and the most relevant resources, such as therapists specializing in terminal illness care. However, with additional training, NPs can also offer therapeutic activities such as guided meditation.

That said, it’s equally important to recognize that NPs’ own mental states can impact their patients. There’s no denying that providing palliative care can be emotionally and psychologically turbulent at times, particularly given the empathetic bonds they forge with patients. If NPs’ mental wellness begins to suffer, this is not only detrimental to their own quality of life but may also impact the quality of the care they provide. It is, therefore, a key part of an NP’s responsibility to take steps to safeguard their wellness. This could include adopting self-care routines and perhaps regularly speaking to therapists about their experiences and feelings.

Streamlining Care Processes

Being able to provide patients with the most thorough and compassionate attention is an important part of being an NP in palliative care. Unfortunately, this can be quite difficult when there are various other tasks to attend to. As a result, one of the ways NPs are most effective is in establishing the most efficient approaches to the tasks that surround the palliative journey.

This may involve regular assessments of medical and administrative practices. Continuously evaluating and improving processes has a variety of benefits. It helps to highlight where there may be unnecessarily repetitive or menial actions that result in inefficiencies. It can also reveal where new technology and automated software tools might offer opportunities to streamline workflows. Not to mention that this type of frequent evaluation is a great way to ensure that NPs are both continuing to meet patients’ needs while maintaining regulatory compliance.

It’s not just NPs themselves that are key to streamlining care processes. Care collaborators, patients, and families can provide useful insights here. Each of these parties has different perspectives on the services provided and what may be influencing bottlenecks or disruptions. NPs lead the charge of carefully gathering and assessing data from these individuals and reviewing what they can adjust accordingly. In essence, this is another way in which NPs facilitate care collaborations that positively impact patients’ quality of life during the palliative journey.

Conclusion

The role of NPs in palliative care involves various medical and administrative duties. However, each of these components, alongside intense empathy and compassion, is geared toward ensuring the most patient-centric approach to care. Throughout each step of making care plans, streamlining processes, and supporting mental wellness, there’s a common thread of striving to offer guidance, comfort, and expertise for this difficult part of life. It’s not an easy career path, but with careful consideration and a strong sense of emotional intelligence, it can certainly be a rewarding one.


Image by Freepik


Katie Brenneman is a passionate writer specializing in lifestyle, mental health, activism-related content. When she isn’t writing, you can find her with her nose buried in a book or hiking with her dog, Charlie. To connect with Katie, you can follow her on Twitter. 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Navigating the Nursing Specialization Spectrum: A 2023 Skills Primer

Many people are under the misconception that Covid caused the nursing shortage that has been plaguing hospitals all over the country for the last several years. Which makes sense. It’s the big bad boogyman that can be blamed for everything from the state of the housing market to the increasingly fraught political scene playing out all across the country.

And while the coronavirus did certainly accelerate resignations in the healthcare industry, reducing the staffing shortages we see today to a casualty of the pandemic ignores the true source of the problem.

Nursing is hard.

So hard, that for decades, more people have been leaving the profession than entering it. And when most nurses quit, they don’t pivot into a different aspect of healthcare. They leave for different waters entirely.

It doesn’t have to be that way. There are many different types of specialties in nursing, each with a unique set of requirements and rewards. In this article, we provide a sweeping primer on the different types of nursing specializations.

Specialty Skills

Despite a fairly quick education for nurses, there a certain set of skills that are required to specialize in a specific nursing field? There are certainly a wide range of concepts that may be unique to each field. However, the skills required to be an effective nurse are largely consistent among the various fields.

  • Empathy: Nurses need to be able to understand and sympathize with their patients’ situations. This quality empowers them to be effective advocates for people who are going through the most vulnerable moments of their lives.
  • Patience: Most people agree that the healthcare industry is frustrating. Just imagine how frustrating it is for people who are completely entrenched in it. Nurses need to have the patience to deal with the stresses of the job and the complications of the industry if they are going to be effective.
  • Adaptability: Nursing requires a significant amount of flexibility every day. As a nurse, you may have long periods of tedium followed by extremely intense and abrupt situations that require your full attention. You will also be expected to adapt to new regulations, expectations, and ways of doing things. School is never completely out for nurses so be prepared for a life of learning.

These skills will help you prepare for a life in nursing, regardless of what specialization you choose. Below, we take a look at how to specialize, and what jobs will be waiting for you when you do.

How to Specialize

All specialized nurses start by going through a four-year degree program, or an accelerated equivalent that is licensed in their state. During that time, they are able to choose specialties that qualify them to work in a unique setting.

However, some specializations may require additional schooling, or training programs. Highly competitive jobs may even only accept applicants who have years of clinical or bedside experience.

Each job is a little bit different in its requirements, but all of them favor professionals who are willing to work hard and put in the time to learn the ropes.

Below we feature five prominent examples of nursing specializations. However, it’s important to keep in mind that there are literally dozens of potential jobs.

Diabetes Nursing

Diabetes is hard to manage. Even healthcare workers with diabetes struggle to get the right balance of glucose-related needs, and often experience sleepless nights as they try to regulate their blood sugar and stay safe.

Imagine how it feels to be on the outside of the healthcare system and find out very abruptly that diabetes has just changed your life forever.

Diabetes nurses are there to help make the transition more manageable. They meet regularly with newly diagnosed diabetics, answering their questions and helping them understand what to expect. Typically, they will work in hospitals, doctors’ offices, clinics, and diabetes management centers.

In certain situations, they may even help people develop a strategy for transitioning out of diabetes (as is sometimes possible with Type 2 diabetes).

It’s important work that literally helps save lives. However, it also tends to have more relaxed hours than traditional bedside nursing. Most diabetes nurses don’t have to work holidays or night shifts, making this an ideal position for people that enjoy being a nurse but are interested in getting a better work-life balance.

Pediatric Nursing

If you like the little kiddos, pediatric nursing might be for you. Pediatric nurses work with infants all the way up to eighteen-year-olds, assisting with a broad range of early health needs. Pediatric nurses can be found in a wide range of settings, including hospitals, clinics, schools, and doctors’ offices.

While they certainly are there to help with the physical needs of their patients, they also receive training to deal with the complex and ever-evolving emotional needs of young patients, making them an important aspect of their patient’s lives.

Critical Care Nursing

Critical care nursing isn’t for the faint of heart. These nurses work with patients in some of their most desperate moments, usually in the ICU, or other high-acuity settings in which the outcome of a procedure could quite literally mean life or death for the patient.

These nurses are specifically trained to work with people who have experienced life-threatening injuries or other deadly health events. Responsibilities can range from assisting in surgery to administering important medications and monitoring vital signs.

As is surely clear, this isn’t a good fit for people who are looking for lower-stakes nursing. However, if you appreciate a fast-paced work environment and you thrive under pressure, this may be right for you.

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing

Gynecological and obstetric nursing specializes in providing care to women during and after pregnancy. It’s very much a women’s health position, focusing particularly on the reproductive stage of life. It can be an exciting job, helping families grow, but there are also many pressures to be aware of.

Gynecological nurses working in the hospital setting will assist with childbirth, which in and of itself is a daunting process. There are also many very significant complications associated with pregnancy and childbirth, adding a degree of pressure to this job.

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing

Psychiatric nursing sees the nurse working directly with patients who are suffering from mental and emotional disorders. These responsibilities play out in psychiatric hospitals, clinics, and even community health centers.

The role of a nurse may be to help manage medications or even administer therapeutic interventions that help the patient cope with mental and emotional distress.

It’s challenging work, certainly not for the faint of heart, but it can make a significant difference in the lives of the patients who are impacted.


Image by Freepik


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.