15 Holiday Wish List Must-Haves for Advanced Practitioners

No matter what you find yourself celebrating this December, here are 15 things advanced practitioners should add to their holiday wish lists.

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Yule, Solstice, or just the end of 2020—no matter what you find yourself celebrating this December, here are 15 things advanced practitioners should add to their holiday wish lists. Or just snag for themselves, because everyone deserves a treat every now and then—especially this year. From ultra-practical antimicrobial scrubs to a fancy coffee maker to help fuel you when you are at your most exhausted, there is something for everyone on this list.

1. The Gift of Mental Wellness via a TalkSpace Gift Card, $79.00+

2. This Light Blocking Sleep Mask to Help You Recharge, Day or Night, $12.99

3. A UV Light Phone Sanitizer, Because Germs, $119.95

4. Some PPE (Because Can You Really Have Enough PPE?), $79.00

5. This Fancy Coffee Maker, $199.99

6. And an Insulated Cup to Keep Your Fancy Coffee Piping Hot, $34.99

7. Some Extra Cozy Antimicrobial Scrub Pants

Women’s, $32.98+

Men’s, $37.98+

9. A Trusty Stethoscope, $98.99+

10. This Insanely Useful Thing That Makes Cooking a Breeze, Even after Your Longest Day, $59.98+

11. Some Stress Relief In A Jar, $15.18

12. A Neck/Back/Shoulder/Everywhere Else That Hurts Deep Tissue Massager, $39.99

13. TLC for Your Hands after Washing Them Vigorously All Year Long, $14.99

14. An Efficient (But Effective) Gratitude Journal, $22.90

15. This Cute & Comfy T-shirt, $14.90+

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.

3 States with the Most Demand for Advanced Practitioners

With healthcare hiring rebounding, where is the demand for NPs, PAs, and CRNAs the greatest? Here are the top three states for these advanced practitioners.

The healthcare workforce, like nearly every other industry, was greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, seeing staggering job losses as the virus, and the economic fallout associated with it, swept across the nation. However, advanced practitioners are essential in a way that most other professions are not at the moment, and hiring remains steady, with the healthcare industry adding back more than 250,000 jobs during July, August, and September.

Where is the demand for NPs, PAs, and CRNAs the greatest, though? We analyzed data from our jobs website to determine what states currently have the highest inventory of openings. Here are the top three states where NPs, PAs, and CRNAs are needed most.

States with the Most Demand for Nurse Practitioners

1. New York

Average Annual Nurse Practitioner Salary in New York: $122,550

Noteworthy Openings in New York:

Click Here to Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs in New York →

2. California

Average Annual Nurse Practitioner Salary in California: $138,660

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs in California →

3. Connecticut

Average Annual Nurse Practitioner Salary in Connecticut: $115,140

Noteworthy Openings in Connecticut:

Click Here to Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs in Connecticut →

States with the Most Demand for Physician Assistants

1. Pennsylvania

Average Annual Physician Assistant Salary in Pennsylvania: $102,620

Noteworthy Openings in Pennsylvania:

Click Here to Search Physician Assistant Jobs in Pennsylvania →

2. Connecticut

Average Annual Physician Assistant Salary in Connecticut: $137,060

Noteworthy Openings in Connecticut:

Click Here to Search Physician Assistant Jobs in Connecticut →

3. New York

Average Annual Physician Assistant Salary in New York: $123,080

Noteworthy Openings in New York:

Click Here to Search Physician Assistant Jobs in New York →

States with the Most Demand for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists

1. Texas

Average Annual CRNA Salary in Texas: $167,020

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search CRNA Jobs in Texas →

2. Florida

Average Annual CRNA Salary in Florida: $160,030

Noteworthy Openings in Florida:

Click Here to Search CRNA Jobs in Florida →

3. Virginia

Average Annual CRNA Salary in Virginia: $180,120

Noteworthy Openings in Virginia:

Click Here to Search CRNA Jobs in Virginia →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our Top 5 Advanced Practice Articles of 2019

As the year comes to a close, we thought it would be a good time to take a look back on our most popular advanced practice articles of 2019. Read them here.

As 2019 comes to a close, we thought it would be a good time to look back at our most popular articles of 2019. Given they all racked up a good amount of views, there’s a chance you might’ve seen some of them before. However, take a look at the list below for our top five most popular blogs, in case you missed some of these great reads the first time around.

1. How Much PAs and NPs Make in Every State


How much do PAs and NPs make across the U.S.? We found out. How does your salary stack up against the average?
Read More →

2. How to Cope When You Hate Your Job


Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.
Read More →

3. Yet Another Physician Speaks Out Against PAs, NPs


As the physician shortage worsens, there is no shortage of physicians speaking out against the idea of PAs and NPs being comparable substitutes.
Read More →

4. Female PAs Still Paid Less than Male PAs


Female PAs earn $.91 to every dollar male PAs earn according to the newly released findings from the AAPA’s annual salary survey.
Read More →

5. 5 Reasons to Give Travel Positions a Try


For those with a sense of adventure, travel positions need no other selling point. If you don’t have a natural love of travel, though, here are five other reasons to consider travel assignments.
Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

AAPA Leaders Welcome German Minister of Health at Bellevue in New York

Last month, the President and Chair of AAPA’s Board of Directors, Dave Mittman, sat down with the German Minister of Health and the founder of the German PA profession to showcase the PA profession.

By Dave Mittman, PA, DFAAPA, President and Chair of AAPA’s Board of Directors

Nothing makes me prouder than showing off the PA profession, especially to folks visiting the U.S. from other countries. While PA practice varies from nation to nation, we all have common interests including a passion for providing the very best healthcare to people who need it.

On Thursday, November 21, AAPA Past-President Jonathan E. Sobel, DMSc, MBA, PA-C, DFAAPA, FAPACVS, and I had the privilege of representing AAPA at a unique gathering at Bellevue Hospital in New York.

There, with PAs who work at Bellevue, we hosted Dr. Marcus Hoffman, MD, founder of the German PA profession, and Dr. Heiner Garg, Minister of Social Affairs, Health, Youth, Family and Senior Citizens of the Land of Schleswig-Holstein – one of Germany’s 16 states.

Both came to see for themselves the fine work PAs do at Bellevue Hospital, one of the oldest and most famous public hospitals in the U.S. After a tour of the Emergency Department and ICU floor, a number of PAs shared their professional stories during a roundtable, providing color to the diverse experiences PAs have here in the U.S.

A personal highlight for me was when the medical director of Bellevue Hospital called PAs “the scaffolding that holds up our hospital.”

We thank Bellevue and their excellent staff for their gracious hospitality, as well as David Lizotte, PA-C, FAPACVS, who worked to put the meeting together and plan the visit.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

10 Things to Put on Your Holiday Wish List as a PA or NP

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa—no matter what you celebrate this holiday season, here is a list of ten awesome items to put on your wish list as a PA or NP.

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa—no matter what you celebrate this holiday season, here is a list of ten awesome items to put on your wish list as a PA or NP. From ultra-practical shoes to adorable bandage badge reels, there is something for everyone.

3M Littmann Classic III Monitoring Stethoscope
Easily one of the most trusted tools you can have in your arsenal.
Rating: 4.7 out of 5
Promising Review: “On the recommendation of a Doc that I work with, I ordered this stethoscope and WOW!! I’m so impressed with the Classic III’s acoustic sensitivity. I get the clearest heart, lung and bowel sounds without any of the light vs firm pressure nonsense of the Lightweight S.E.”

CHEROKEE Infinity Mid Rise Tapered Leg Jogger Pant
Is there anything better than a super comfortable pair of scrubs? We don’t think so.
Rating: 4.4 out of 5
Promising Review: “IN LOVE with these jogger scrubs. They are very comfortable and I love the material. Nothing sticks to it (including my dog’s hair). I’ve gotten so many compliments with these scrubs.”

Before Patients, After Patients 11 oz Coffee Mug and 15 oz Stemless Wine Glass Set
Because patients. Fuel up and wind down with this mug and wine glass combo.
Rating: 5 out of 5
Promising Review: “A bit of humor a whole lot of truth. I am a retired RN and I certainly would have loved receiving this as a gift.”

Ninja Hot and Cold Brewed System, Auto-iQ Tea and Coffee Maker
So you’ll have something to put in your “Before Patients” mug.
Rating: 4.6 out of 5
Promising Review: “I love this machine so much! It is easy to use; looks nice sitting on my counter; and makes a great cup of coffee. I like that I can easily make a large pot of coffee or just one cup. Plus I can make almost any type of coffee there is!”

PhoneSoap 3 UV Smartphone Sanitizer & Universal Charger
Because germs are everywhere when you work in healthcare.
Rating: 4.4 out of 5
Promising Review: “Bought this along with a set of agar plates to test it for ourselves. We swabbed my daughter’s and husband’s phones before and after use. It does work. We are very happy with the product.”

Bandage Badge Reel
I mean, come on. Could they get any cuter?
Rating: 4.7 out of 5
Promising Review: “These are SO CUTE and my patients absolutely love them. My co-workers love them too. 10/10 recommend to anyone.”

A Simpler Time Nurse Practitioner Wood Sign with Personalized Nameboard
Perfect for any NP run practice.
Rating: 4.7 out of 5
Promising Review: “The MOST beautiful piece of work! The name is not only printed, but etched into the wood. The subtle elegant details are breathtaking. The way that the sign looks incredibly professional, yet shows a little humor, is a perfect compliment in our office. I cannot recommend this piece enough!”

The One-Minute Gratitude Journal
Cultivate an attitude of gratitude in just one minute a day.
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
Promising Review: “Absolutely love this. It is simple and straightforward, with the same prompt for each day. It allows you to write in the day & date of each entry and also has blank pages for brain dumping or doodling. Highly recommend this to anyone who seeks gratitude for the little and big things alike.”

Dansko Women’s Professional Mule
Comfortable and durable shoes are an absolute must-have.
Rating: 4.3 out of 5
Promising Review: “I have resisted the traditional “nurse shoe” for a long time, but I have come to realize there is a reason so many of my nurse and physician cohorts have chosen this shoe. Time (and body fluids) will tell how well they hold up. Just wearing them around the house, I can feel a definite difference in support. The platform will take a little getting used to.”

My Quotable Patients – The Funniest Things Patients Say: A Journal
Hopefully, one day, you’ll look back on every hilarious thing a patient has said and smile.
Rating: 4.8 out of 5
Promising Review: “Bought as a gift for my husband’s cousin who graduated nursing school. I think this is a super cute book for those memorable patients who are the reason why they chose to go in this career.”

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.

This Year, Advanced Practitioners Are Thankful For…

We asked and you answered: what has your career in healthcare made you most thankful for? Here are ten of our favorite responses.

We asked and you answered: what has your career in healthcare made you most thankful for? We received a lot of great responses—some heartwarming, some hilarious, all valid reasons to be grateful—and we picked our top ten favorite answers to feature this week. Here they are.

This job isn’t always easy, but to know that I have been able to change lives for the better will always be something I will be thankful for. —Valerie P.

* * *

I am grateful for my colleagues for keeping me sane and constantly pushing me to do better. —Erika B.

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I am proud to be an NP and help change and shape what healthcare looks like in my community and across the country. I’m definitely grateful for that. —Ariel L.

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I’m continually learning in my job and I’m thankful for that. It’s never boring and it always keeps me on my toes. —Katherine H.

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This year and every year, I am grateful to do what I love, alongside people I respect and admire, and that I get to enjoy every day at my job, even the hard ones. —Courtney K.

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My job is never boring and I’m grateful for that. Even if it seems like it would be nice to be bored sometimes. It sure beats the alternative. —Coral C.

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I’m grateful for the bonds I’ve been able to form with the people I work with and my longtime patients. —Michael R.

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I’ve seen patients in some truly bad spots in life. I’m grateful to have been able to help them go on to lead better, healthier lives. That’s rewarding as hell. —Paula P.

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I took on my first travel assignment this year and I’m so thankful I did. What a blessing that has been. So glad I chose a profession that lets me do this. —Jordan C.

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Let’s be honest here: I’m thankful for my salary. —Jamie P.

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No matter what you are thankful for this year, we are thankful for you and all you do. Happy Thanksgiving from our family to yours.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Talk to Patients Who Oppose Vaccines

Measles disappeared from the U.S. in 2000. Now, it’s back, with 1,172 cases across 30 states. Here’s how to talk to patients about the importance of vaccines.

As of August 1, 2019, the CDC reported 1,172 cases of measles across 30 states, the greatest number of cases reported in the U.S. since measles was eliminated from the country in the year 2000.

It is commonly known among healthcare professionals that the best way to protect against measles and many other preventable diseases is to vaccinate. However, since 2001, the number of people who did not receive vaccines for preventable diseases has quadrupled, thanks in part to what is commonly known as the “anti-vax” movement. The movement, which has been around for more than a hundred years, has found its foothold in pseudoscience and misinformation disguised as advocacy. At the very least, anti-vaxxers have made it harder for medical professionals to do their jobs and, in what is arguably the worst-case scenario, they and their message have put lives in jeopardy.

But not everyone who does not vaccinate is staunchly anti-vaccines—some are hesitant, others are misinformed. Still, speaking to them about vaccines may be challenging for even the most seasoned provider. Here are some tips that might make the conversation go a bit more smoothly.

Listen to Their Concerns

No one wants to feel like they are being strong-armed or railroaded. Though their concerns may be medically invalid, they are still personally valid to them. Be sure to listen to what they have to say, with empathy and without interrupting, so you know their concerns and, in turn, how to respond to them.

Counter with Facts

They may bring up misinformation as part of their concerns, such as claims that certain vaccines are “linked to” autism or SIDS. As you likely know, there is a barrage of evidence against these unfounded claims. It is your job as a medical professional to provide them with science-based facts to alleviate these concerns.

Stand Firm, but Know You May Not Win

It may take more than one conversation to quell all of their concerns and allow you to administer vaccinations. Be prepared to have the conversation the next time they come to see you, and be sure to explain the risks involved in their decision to not vaccinate in the meantime, as well as precautions they can take to keep themselves, their child, and/or the public as safe as possible while unvaccinated.

What other methods have you found to be effective in speaking to patients about vaccines? Leave them in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Physicians vs. Advanced Practitioners: Where Do You Stand?

A battle has been brewing between advanced practitioners seeking to expand their scope of practice and the physicians who oppose them. Where do you stand?

A battle has been brewing within the medical community for quite some time. As the physician workload has steadily multiplied due to physician shortages and increased documentation requirements, advanced practice nurses and physician assistants have upped their fight for full practice authority in an effort to boost productivity, lower health care costs, and increase access to care. This hot-button issue has split the physician community down the middle, into those who are glad for the assistance and those who greatly oppose non-doctors treating patients as if they are doctors. And, lately, for those who oppose APNs and PAs, the gloves have come off, so to speak.

Despite study after study after study after study finding that APNs and PAs provide care comparable to or even better than physicians, multiple doctors have taken to the internet to speak out against expanding their scope of practice.

“With all due respect to our healthcare team, I beg to differ that going through four years of college and completing an additional two years – sometimes online, no less – can truly be “just as effective”,” wrote Starla Fitch, MD, in an op-ed entitled NPs/PAs ‘Just as Effective’ as Physicians? I Don’t Think So.

In another posting, an open letter penned by the Presidents of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine Resident and Student Association directed at the American Medical Association Board of Directors called for the AMA to implement a public awareness campaign that “advocates for physician-led care and educates the public of the discrepancies in nurse practitioner care” and increase “resources on state-level legislative operations that combat independent practice bills introduced by midlevel providers.” The authors of the open letter went on to state, “These efforts should be a priority for the AMA. Waiting for the complete devaluation of our medical degrees and the resulting significant harm to our patients’ safety as they actively pursue less capable “providers” is not acceptable. We must work together to directly combat this pressing issue in order to protect our profession, our future physicians, and most importantly our patients.”

“There are absolutely patient safety concerns associated with NP and PA care. We don’t diminish the fact that physicians make mistakes, of course, but the type of mistake is often very different from those of non-physician practitioners. We have had many physicians and patients share stories with us of missed diagnoses and misdiagnoses by NPs and PAs, as well as excessive and inappropriate testing, prescribing, and treatment,” said another physician—Carmen Kavali, MD, who is also a board member of Physicians for Patient Protection.

There is no shortage of opposition. However, as Alison Moriarty Daley, MSN, APRN, PNP, put it as far back as 2011, “There are too many people who need high-quality, dedicated providers; we are such providers and deserve the appropriate respect, recognition, and support from the healthcare community.”

The physician shortage is not getting any better. The Association of American Medical Colleges predicts a shortage of between 21,100 and 55,200 primary care physicians by 2032, and physicians are burning out and, sadly, dying by suicide at an alarming rate. So, why the fight?

Where do you stand on the issue? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

PAs to Prescribe Medical Marijuana in NH

New Hampshire’s Governor signed a bill on Friday, expanding the list of providers who are allowed to prescribe medical marijuana to include physician assistants.

Governor Chris Sununu (R-NH) signed a bill on Friday, expanding the list of providers allowed to prescribe medical marijuana in New Hampshire. Under the bill, a licensed physician assistant, who possesses an active registration from the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to prescribe controlled substances, and who receives the express consent of a supervising physician, will be able to prescribe cannabis for therapeutic purposes. The legislation is slated to go into effect 60 days after its passage.

Another bill, which would allow medical marijuana users to grow their own cannabis at home also awaits the Governor’s signature.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Maine Law Allows PAs, NPs, Midwives to Perform Abortions

When the bill goes into effect next June, Maine will be the eighth state to permit advanced practitioners to provide abortion services.

With the signing of a bill by Governor Janet Mills this week, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and certified nurse-midwives gained the ability to provide abortion medication and perform in-clinic abortions in the state of Maine. The bill, which was introduced into legislation by the Governor herself, aims to expand access to reproductive health care for women across Maine, particularly for those located in rural areas.

“Allowing qualified and licensed medical professionals to perform abortions will ensure that Maine women, especially those in rural areas, are able to access critical reproductive health care services when and where they need them from qualified providers they know and trust. These health care professionals are trained in family planning, counseling, and abortion procedures, the overwhelming majority of which are completed without complications,” Governor Mills said in a statement released on Monday. “Maine is defending the rights of women and taking a step toward equalizing access to care as other states are seeking to undermine, rollback, or outright eliminate these services.”

When the bill goes into effect next June, Maine will be the eighth state—joining New Hampshire, Vermont, Alaska, California, Colorado, New York and Oregon—to permit advanced practitioners to provide abortion services.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.