Searching for Medical Jobs: Going Where the Money Is

Despite the modern workforce wanting more than just good pay and benefits, there is no getting around the fact that people want to be paid what they feel they are worth. Healthcare workers are not an exception to the rule. It is with that in mind that looking at the top job markets for healthcare workers gets interesting. Some markets definitely pay more than others.

 Becker’s Hospital Review recently released a list of the highest paying job markets for healthcare workers in the U.S., based on data from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS). Most of what the data shows isn’t surprising. But there are a few hidden gems in the numbers.

 It is reasonable to assume that job seekers on the hunt for medical jobs might consider salary and benefits first. After that, they might look at things like location and work environment. Moreover, it could be that the majority of American workers do not necessarily want to pick up and move just to make more money.

 Top Locations for Nurses

 The first category examined by Becker’s was registered nurses (RNs). We already know that RNs are in high demand across the country. But where do they earn the most money? Apparently, it’s in California. All the top spots on the Becker’s list are found in the Golden State. Here they are:

  •  San Jose – $155,230
  • San Francisco – $151,640
  • Vallejo-Fairfield – $146,360
  • Santa Rosa – $141,440
  • Napa – $139,680.

 California seems like the place to be if you are a registered nurse hoping to maximize your paycheck. That’s curious, considering that supply and demand heavily influences salary and benefits. What is it about California that appears to make it more difficult to recruit registered nurses there?

 Advanced Practice Nurses

 Becker’s Hospital Review took the approach of dividing advanced practice nurses into two categories: nurse practitioners and physician assistants. That could be due to the fact that the top paying locations for both are different. NPs are paid most in four of the same five cities listed in the RN category. For the fifth city, just remove Santa Rosa and insert Yuba City. San Jose keeps the top spot at $197,870.

 PAs apparently make the most in the joint cities of Portsmouth, NH and Portsmouth, ME. There, they earn roughly $167,240. The remaining four of the top five cities for PAs are:

  •  Panama City, FL – $165,000
  • San Francisco – $164,150
  • San Jose – $163,720
  • Vallejo-Fairfield, CA – $162,030.
  •  California still commands three of the top five spots for physician assistants. So far, the Golden State appears to be the destination of choice for high paying medical jobs.

 Top Locations for Pharmacists

 Last on the list for Becker’s are pharmacists. If you are guessing that California jobs pay the most, you are spot on. Here are the numbers:

  •  San Jose – $168,640
  • San Francisco – $163,840
  • Santa Rosa – $158,420
  • Vallejo-Fairfield – $156,850
  • Santa Cruz – $152,770.

 It is clear that medical jobs pay extremely well in California. We just don’t quite know why. We cannot discount supply and demand but getting a clear picture would also require looking at things like median income, cost of living, and so forth. Just because healthcare workers make more money in California doesn’t mean they enjoy a higher standard of living. Things cost more on the West coast as well.

 At any rate, if you are in the hunt for medical jobs, California has plenty to offer. So do most other states. Take a good look around our job board and see what you can find. With so many jobs available in nearly every healthcare sector, you’re bound to find something that suits you.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where to Go for Help Getting into Med School and Other Professional Healthcare Programs

Even if you already have a bachelor’s degree, you may not be ready for the advanced education required for medical school, dental school, physician assistant school, or other professional healthcare programs. So what can you do?

You may want to consider a post-baccalaureate premedical/prehealth program. In the following, I’ll explain how you can benefit from such a program.

I’m an associate professor and Chair of Natural Sciences in the Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University. Over nearly 20 years, I’ve seen firsthand how a post-baccalaureate program can help prepare students for the next stage of their education path — and their life.

Could you benefit from this type of program? Let’s take a look.

1. Prove you’ve mastered certain subjects

When you apply to a professional healthcare program like med school, the admissions committee will invariably be looking closely at your undergraduate academic performance.

But if your grades aren’t especially strong, a post-baccalaureate program could help. That’s because it enables you to retake courses — upper level science courses in particular — that you didn’t do so well in the first time around.

More specifically, a post-baccalaureate program gives you a chance to demonstrate an upward trend in your academic performance, which is what that admissions committee will be looking for if your undergraduate GPA is less than ideal.

(For more information, see 8 Things to Know About Improving Your GPA to Get Into Medical School and Other Professional Healthcare Programs.)

2. Fulfill prerequisites

Before you can pursue a professional healthcare degree, you will need to have successfully completed a number of prerequisite science courses.

But if your undergraduate degree is in a subject like, for example, history, English, or a foreign language, it’s likely that you didn’t take many science courses.

A post-baccalaureate program gives you the opportunity to take those prerequisite courses.

3. Prepare for the standardized entrance exam

If you want to be a medical doctor or doctor of osteopathic medicine, you’ll need to take the Medical College Admission Test. If you’re interested in becoming a dentist, then you’ll need to take the Dental Admission Test. Other healthcare programs have their own entrance exam equivalents.

Obviously, you’ll want to be as ready as possible for your entrance exam.

The good news is that post-baccalaureate programs commonly offer preparatory classes and other resources specifically intended to help students prepare for entrance exams.

4. Benefit from advising that caters to your specific needs

To be thoroughly prepared for the next phase of your education, you’ll likely need to do more than just retake a few upper level science courses at a local university. In fact, if you do that, you’ll largely be on your own.

On the other hand, the best post-baccalaureate programs can help you at every stage of your journey thanks to personalized support from an individual advisor — as well as from experienced professors familiar with the unique needs of post-baccalaureate students.

Your advisor and course professors can also support your efforts by providing letters of recommendation, offering insights for your personal statement, and helping you prepare for entrance exams, to name just a few examples.

(Important note: Post-baccalaureate programs will vary. As you consider potential programs, be sure to ask about the advising component. Also, check out Choosing the Right Post-Baccalaureate/Pre-Med Program: 10 Key Questions to Ask.)

5. Gain other advantages from an organized program designed for people like you

In addition to the above, you can gain a number of other advantages from being in a post-baccalaureate program. Here are some of the most important:

  • Enjoy a support network of fellow students with similar goals
  • Have access to opportunities like volunteering and job-shadowing, which can make you a more competitive applicant
  • Participate in mock interviews to prepare for the real thing
  • Practice taking admission tests
  • Connect with current and retired healthcare professionals for advice and insights

Take the next step and start exploring post-baccalaureate programs

If your dream career in healthcare seems out of reach, you now can see how a post-baccalaureate premedical/prehealth program could help. Do any of the points above resonate with you?

If so, then I strongly recommend you take the next step and start exploring programs.

 Jason Thoen, PhD, is an associate professor and Chair of Natural Sciences in the Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University.

 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare Jobs at the Mall? Yes, It’s a Thing!

Could your search for healthcare jobs lead you to a new position at the mall? Absolutely. As healthcare systems and medical groups are looking for ways to expand without putting a ton of money into new buildings, they are finding the mall environment quite attractive. Malls all over the country are being transformed into mixed-use facilities that include medical facilities of all stripes.

 Vanderbilt University Medical Center has already successfully converted open space at one Nashville mall into multiple clinics. Now they have their eyes set on the Hickory Hollow Mall in the city’s southeast district. The mall offers more than 1 million square feet of easily flexible space, space that could be utilized by a health clinic just as easily as a clothing boutique.

 Saving the Dying Mall

 America’s shopping malls became the place to see and be seen when they first emerged in the 1970s. Throughout the eighties and into the nineties, shopping mall owners enjoyed strong revenue and plenty of growth. But then, for whatever reason, the mall began dying out. An already struggling business model took a big hit from the COVID pandemic.

 These days, owners are looking for every possible way to save the dying mall. Mixed-use projects are one way to do that. Furthermore, inviting medical facilities to set up shop in empty mall space is a win-win for multiple reasons. Property owners benefit by signing new tenants. Medical facilities benefit from two things malls offer in spades: floor space and parking.

 Shopping malls are known for their wide-open spaces, especially in anchor stores. Turning a former department store into a surgical center is just one example. The owner of a medical center walks in and has hundreds of thousands of square feet ready to be converted into surgical suites. Outside is a vast ocean of parking space that offers patients easy access.

 The Possibilities Are Endless

 If this new mixed-use model catches on with medical groups, the possibilities could be endless. From primary care clinics to remote healthcare screening solutions, nothing is off the table. That means plenty of healthcare jobs in spaces that used to be occupied by retail workers hawking everything from bedsheets to jeans.

 Turning vacant mall space into medical space is the real estate equivalent of repurposing. It is a fantastic idea whose time has come. Think about it. How much land was cleared to build that huge mall that now sits nearly empty? It doesn’t make sense to tear the structure down and start over again. So why not re-purpose it?

 Malls are perfect for redevelopment because they are essentially skeletons of flexible space. Malls are architectural shells. You keep the perimeter walls and roof intact while inside, the space is flexible enough to accommodate just about anything. Malls are designed to be that way.

 Mixing Medical with Retail

 Even more intriguing is the concept of mixing medical with retail. One group of workers goes to the mall in search of retail jobs. Another group seeks out medical jobs. While they are all working their typical 9-to-5s, patients and customers become one and the same. They see their doctors first thing in the morning, then head down the walkway to pick up a cup of coffee before going shopping. It is a marriage made in heaven.

 Your next search for healthcare jobs may very well have you looking at mall employment. You might not be staffing the cash register at a retail shop, but you could be offering primary healthcare services in a clinic right next door. It is the wave of the future.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare’s Most Wanted

Healthcare professionals are clearly some of the most essential workers in the country. But which are needed the most right now and where? We break it down for you.

More than a year on from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the resulting record unemployment rate of 14.8%, the job market has begun to stabilize, nearing pre-pandemic figures—5.1% in August of 2021, compared to 3.5% in February of 2020.

Through it all, though, healthcare employment has been essential. Despite job losses in some specialties and settings, our nation has needed doctors, nurses, and the like on the frontlines in a way no other industry has seen a need for employment. Lives were literally on the line, and jobs had to be filled to save them. A sentiment that is true, once again, as hospitals fill to capacity in some parts of the country, due to the Delta variant.

What types of healthcare professionals are needed the most now, and where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

10 Most In-Demand Position Types:

  1. Registered Nurses
  2. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses
  3. Physicians
  4. Technicians
  5. Physical Therapists
  6. Certified Nursing Assistants
  7. Nurse Practitioners
  8. Speech Language Pathologists
  9. Respiratory Therapists
  10. Occupational Therapists

10 Most In-Demand Specialties:

  1. Insurance
  2. Education
  3. Intensive Care
  4. Patient Care
  5. Telemetry
  6. Home Health
  7. Customer Service
  8. Pediatrics
  9. Rehabilitation
  10. Pharmacy

10 Most In-Demand Locations:

  1. California
  2. Georgia
  3. Texas
  4. Pennsylvania
  5. Florida
  6. New York
  7. Illinois
  8. North Carolina
  9. Ohio
  10. Massachusetts

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where Healthcare Support Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Working in healthcare has always garnered a lot of respect, especially over the last year. But is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Working in healthcare can garner a lot of respect, as we’ve certainly seen over the last year with many in the industry being hailed as heroes for working on the frontlines of the pandemic.

However, is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Below are the ten states offering the highest and the lowest average salaries for ten popular healthcare support professions, listed alphabetically, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $108,400
  2. Hawaii – $101,570
  3. Alaska – $95,990
  4. District of Columbia – $94,260
  5. Rhode Island – $92,460
  6. Washington – $92,150
  7. Oregon – $91,550
  8. Massachusetts – $89,080
  9. Wisconsin – $86,810
  10. Colorado – $86,370

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $57,870
  2. Georgia – $61,100
  3. Mississippi – $62,600
  4. West Virginia – $62,920
  5. Louisiana – $63,520
  6. Arkansas – $64,670
  7. South Dakota – $64,840
  8. Tennessee – $65,750
  9. Michigan – $66,020
  10. Kentucky – $67,520

EMTs & Paramedics – Highest Paying States

  1. Hawaii – $58,580
  2. Washington – $56,910
  3. Maryland – $53,440
  4. Alaska – $50,030
  5. California – $48,280
  6. Illinois – $48,040
  7. District of Columbia – $47,460
  8. New York – $46,920
  9. Massachusetts – $46,110
  10. Connecticut – $45,800

EMTs & Paramedics – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $30,520
  2. Alabama – $30,770
  3. Kansas – $31,500
  4. Kentucky – $32,030
  5. Mississippi – $32,250
  6. South Dakota – $33,110
  7. Montana – $34,090
  8. Michigan – $34,410
  9. Arkansas – $34,630
  10. Ohio – $34,680

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $35,360
  2. North Dakota – $34,020
  3. Massachusetts – $33,890
  4. Vermont – $33,810
  5. Washington – $32,860
  6. New York – $32,140
  7. District of Columbia – $31,810
  8. California – $31,270
  9. Rhode Island – $30,790
  10. Oregon – $30,730

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $19,800
  2. Alabama – $20,960
  3. Mississippi – $21,520
  4. West Virginia – $21,730
  5. Texas – $21,750
  6. Oklahoma – $22,320
  7. North Carolina – $22,920
  8. Tennessee – $23,130
  9. Virginia – $23,360
  10. Arkansas – $23,510

Medical Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $46,610
  2. Washington – $45,700
  3. District of Columbia – $45,340
  4. Massachusetts – $43,090
  5. Minnesota – $43,090
  6. California – $42,990
  7. Oregon – $41,700
  8. Connecticut – $41,070
  9. Hawaii – $40,530
  10. New York – $39,850

Medical Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $29,820
  2. Alabama – $29,950
  3. Mississippi – $30,550
  4. Louisiana – $31,110
  5. Arkansas – $31,530
  6. Oklahoma – $31,790
  7. South Dakota – $31,910
  8. Kansas – $32,030
  9. New Mexico – $32,340
  10. South Carolina – $33,010

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. District of Columbia – $47,110
  2. California – $46,140
  3. Washington – $45,990
  4. Massachusetts – $44,900
  5. Rhode Island – $43,740
  6. Hawaii – $43,620
  7. New Jersey – $43,130
  8. Minnesota – $42,730
  9. Oregon – $42,550
  10. New York – $42,170

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Mississippi – $30,980
  2. Louisiana – $32,680
  3. West Virginia – $32,940
  4. Tennessee – $33,460
  5. Montana – $33,550
  6. New Mexico – $33,710
  7. Kentucky – $34,080
  8. Oklahoma – $34,200
  9. Wyoming – $35,110
  10. Florida – $35,150

Nursing Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $42,500
  2. New York – $40,620
  3. California – $39,280
  4. Hawaii – $38,650
  5. Massachusetts – $37,160
  6. Oregon – $37,100
  7. District of Columbia – $36,980
  8. Washington – $36,310
  9. Minnesota – $36,040
  10. North Dakota – $35,510

Nursing Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $24,300
  2. Mississippi – $24,400
  3. Alabama – $25,600
  4. Arkansas – $26,550
  5. Oklahoma – $27,220
  6. Missouri – $27,720
  7. South Carolina – $27,760
  8. North Carolina – $27,800
  9. Tennessee – $27,940
  10. Kentucky – $27,980

Pharmacy Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,620
  2. Alaska – $46,430
  3. Washington – $46,400
  4. District of Columbia – $46,240
  5. Oregon – $43,410
  6. Hawaii – $42,300
  7. North Dakota – $41,390
  8. Minnesota – $39,770
  9. Nevada – $39,390
  10. Wyoming – $39,330

Pharmacy Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Kentucky – $30,370
  2. Alabama – $30,980
  3. Arkansas – $31,010
  4. Pennsylvania – $31,760
  5. West Virginia – $31,890
  6. Georgia – $32,160
  7. Ohio – $32,520
  8. Oklahoma – $32,900
  9. North Carolina – $33,300
  10. Missouri – $33,670

Phlebotomists – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,230
  2. New York – $44,630
  3. District of Columbia – $43,960
  4. Alaska – $43,270
  5. Washington – $42,530
  6. Massachusetts – $42,030
  7. Connecticut – $41,170
  8. Oregon – $40,560
  9. Delaware – $40,520
  10. Maryland – $40,300

Phlebotomists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $29,050
  2. Louisiana – $30,600
  3. Arkansas – $31,120
  4. Oklahoma – $31,400
  5. Mississippi – $31,640
  6. Missouri – $31,830
  7. Kentucky – $32,190
  8. Tennessee – $32,210
  9. Maine – $32,380
  10. Iowa – $32,430

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $95,010
  2. Hawaii – $82,990
  3. District of Columbia – $82,270
  4. Alaska – $79,330
  5. Massachusetts – $78,830
  6. Washington – $77,310
  7. Oregon – $76,520
  8. Rhode Island – $74,670
  9. New York – $73,150
  10. Connecticut – $72,470

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $47,300
  2. Mississippi – $48,100
  3. Arkansas – $52,290
  4. Tennessee – $53,030
  5. Kentucky – $53,090
  6. Iowa – $53,400
  7. Louisiana – $53,610
  8. West Virginia – $53,690
  9. South Dakota – $54,610
  10. Kansas – $55,770

Surgical Technologists – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $67,120
  2. Nevada – $67,000
  3. California – $64,570
  4. Connecticut – $62,310
  5. District of Columbia – $61,620
  6. Minnesota – $61,300
  7. Washington – $60,450
  8. Oregon – $59,480
  9. Rhode Island – $59,410
  10. New York – $59,380

Surgical Technologists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $38,660
  2. West Virginia – $39,890
  3. Mississippi – $41,520
  4. Louisiana – $42,140
  5. Arkansas – $42,390
  6. Iowa – $43,780
  7. South Carolina – $43,880
  8. Kentucky – $44,180
  9. Tennessee – $44,540
  10. South Dakota – $44,700

Ready to start your search for a higher paying healthcare job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapy’s Most In-Demand Roles

Despite being majorly impacted by the pandemic, healthcare employment is rebounding at a steady clip. What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now, and where?

As the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in April of 2020, despite being, arguably, the most needed and relevant industry, healthcare accounted for approximately 6.8% of the more than 20 million jobs lost in the U.S. during that time.

Fast forward to present day, and healthcare is rebounding at a steady clip. Despite the current overall unemployment rate being 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare has dropped to only 3.1%. Healthcare has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when it added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

1. Speech-Language Pathologist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 30%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida
View All SLP Jobs →

2. Physical Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 22.2%
Most Needed In: California, Florida, Texas, Georgia, and New York
View All PT Jobs →

3. Occupational Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 18.4%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, Florida, and New York
View All OT Jobs →

4. Respiratory Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 16.1%
Most Needed In: Ohio, Texas, Florida, Michigan, and Georgia
View All RT Jobs →

5. Physical Therapist Assistant

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 7.3%
Most Needed In: California, New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Connecticut
View All PTA Jobs →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare’s 5 Most In-Demand Roles, Specialties, & Locations

Unemployment in healthcare is now only 3.1% and the industry has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months. What healthcare professionals are needed the most, and where?

In April of 2020, as COVID-19 spread rapidly through our country, the unemployment rate reached 14.8%—the highest rate observed since data collection began in 1948.

Despite being, arguably, the most needed professionals in the country during an unprecedented health emergency, the healthcare industry accounted for 6.8% of jobs lost during that time, with employment in the field declining by 1.4 million.

Over a year later, though, one could say healthcare is booming, yet again. Despite the overall unemployment rate currently sitting at 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare is now only 3.1%. The industry has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when the industry added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of healthcare professionals are needed the most? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

5 Most In-Demand Position Types:

  1. Registered Nurse
  2. Technologist/Technician
  3. Certified Nursing Assistant
  4. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
  5. Physician

5 Most In-Demand Specialties:

  1. Insurance
  2. Education
  3. Patient Care
  4. Customer Service
  5. Rehabilitation

5 Most In-Demand Locations:

  1. California
  2. Texas
  3. New York
  4. Georgia
  5. Pennsylvania

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

4 Ways to Spring Clean for Your Job Search

Spring is, traditionally, one of the best times to make a career move. Here’s how to spring clean for your job search, and get growing elsewhere.

Spring has arrived, and for many, it has brought with it a mindset of growth, change, and new beginnings. It is also, traditionally, one of the best times to make a career move, with employers eager to lock in and onboard new hires before Memorial Day. If you find that you are no longer blooming where you are currently planted, it may be time to set down new roots. Here’s how to spring clean for your job search, and get growing elsewhere.

Weed Out What You Don’t Want

The last year has been hard for many, especially those who work in healthcare. Take stock of what you do and do not want, and what you will and will not accept, especially in terms of your career, and figure out what roles might align with this mindset. If you have been in a demanding patient-facing role, maybe look into what non-clinical roles might be a good fit for you. Or if you have been working in a high-volume hospital, maybe it’s time to consider making a shift to a more rural setting, or into private practice. Bored with your specialty? It might be time to retrain in another. Get out of the weeds, and give yourself a chance to grow in a role better suited for you.

Tidy Up Your Resume

Once you know what you are looking for, it’s time to dust off the ol’ resume. Make sure all of the information on your resume, social media, and job search profiles is current (and, regarding social media, appropriate), and that it properly reflects what you are looking for in your next role. This article we shared at the start of the year is a great place to pick up some tips on how to revamp your resume. And, of course, we recommend you update your profile on HealthJobsNationwide.com, as well.

Branch Out via Your Network

Learning to ask for help isn’t always easy, but when it comes to your job search, it can make all the difference. “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know,” is a popular saying for a reason, and so is, “more hands make light work.” Reach out to those in your network and let them know you are on the hunt for a new opportunity. You may be surprised by just how willing your friends, old and new, will be to help you, and who they may know that you may not. Someone in-the-know could connect you to a decision maker in a more personal way than if you just applied online, or you may be able to find out about a job before it is posted, putting you at an advantage. Take the time to make new connections on social media (or in person, if you’re comfortable), and use those connections to your benefit. And be sure to take out the trash, too, while you’re at it, cutting ties with any toxic people in your life who aren’t rooting for you to win.

Nurture Yourself

Searching for a new job is not always easy. Despite demand for healthcare professionals being higher than most other industries, that does not mean there isn’t healthy competition. You may not land your dream job right away, forcing you to stay in a less satisfying role or remain unemployed. While that certainly is not ideal, it is imperative that you not get discouraged and be kind to yourself during the process. Clear out your negative thoughts, practice good self care, and rest when you need to. Nothing blooms the same day it is planted. Give it time.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Winter Blues? Here Are Healthcare Jobs in Warm Locales.

If this weather has you dreaming of warmer locales, here are the 5 cities with the warmest average temps in February, and their most in-demand healthcare jobs.

This month, a record-breaking deep freeze impacted most of the United States, leaving more than 70% of the lower 48 states blanketed in snow and millions without power. If this weather has you dreaming of warmer locales, here are the five cities with the warmest average temperatures in February, and the most in-demand healthcare jobs in each location, according to data from our job board.

1. Miami, FL

Average Temperature in February: 70.0°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Respiratory Therapist
3. Physician
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Dental Assistant
Search All Jobs in Miami, FL →

2. Palm Springs, CA

Average Temperature in February: 64.5°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Physician
3. Speech Language Pathologist
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physical Therapist
Search All Jobs in Palm Springs, CA →

3. Tampa, FL

Average Temperature in February: 63.2°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
3. Certified Nursing Assistant
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physician
Search All Jobs in Tampa, FL →

4. Phoenix, AZ

Average Temperature in February: 59.8°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Medical Assistant
3. Certified Nursing Assistant
4. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
5. Physical Therapist
Search All Jobs in Phoenix, AZ →

5. Los Angeles, CA

Average Temperature in February: 58.9°
Most In-Demand Healthcare Jobs:
1. Registered Nurse
2. Physician
3. Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
4. Speech Language Pathologist
5. Nurse Practitioner
Search All Jobs in Los Angeles, CA →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

These Are the Best Healthcare Jobs in America

Healthcare professionals have received a lot of praise over the last year, often being lauded as heroes. But which healthcare jobs ranked as the best?

Those who work in healthcare have always known how essential their jobs are. The rest of the world learned this in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold and forever changed the way the healthcare profession will be viewed by the general public. Physicians and Registered Nurses, in particular, were heaped with praise, becoming the heroes of our nation and the world.

But which healthcare jobs are best? Not the most celebrated or well-recognized, but the best—best for salary, work-life balance, stress level, the job market, and future growth. U.S. News & World Report released their annual rankings based on these very metrics. The 20 best healthcare jobs according to their findings are listed below.

1. Physician Assistant

Overall Score: 8.3 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.4/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $112,260
Other Rankings: #1 in 100 Best Jobs, #1 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Physician Assistant Jobs →

2. Nurse Practitioner

Overall Score: 8.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 10/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $109,820
Other Rankings: #3 in 100 Best Jobs, #3 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs →

3. Physician

Overall Score: 7.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $206,500
Other Rankings: #5 in 100 Best Jobs, #8 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Physician Jobs →

4. Speech-Language Pathologist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $79,120
Other Rankings: #7 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Speech-Language Pathologist Jobs →

5. Dentist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 9.9/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $155,600
Other Rankings: #7 in Best STEM Jobs, #9 in 100 Best Jobs, #11 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Dentist Jobs →

6. Veterinarian

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $95,460
Other Rankings: #10 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Veterinarian Jobs →

7. Orthodontist

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 8/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #5 in Best Paying Jobs, #8 in Best STEM Jobs, #11 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Orthodontist Jobs →

8. Anesthesiologist

Overall Score: 7.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #1 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Anesthesiologist Jobs →

9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #3 in Best Paying Jobs, #18 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Jobs →

10. Occupational Therapist

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $84,950
Other Rankings: #19 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Occupational Therapist Jobs →

11. Physical Therapist

Overall Score: 6.9 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.5/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $89,440
Other Rankings: #21 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Physical Therapist Jobs →

12. Psychiatrist

Overall Score: 6.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 6/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #7 in Best Paying Jobs, #27 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Psychiatrist Jobs →

13. Prosthodontist

Overall Score: 6.7 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #6 in Best Paying Jobs, #35 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Prosthodontist Jobs →

14. Registered Nurse

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.8/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $73,300
Other Rankings: #37 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Registered Nurse Jobs →

15. Nurse Anesthetist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $174,790
Other Rankings: #10 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in Best STEM Jobs, #39 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Nurse Anesthetist Jobs →

16. Obstetrician and Gynecologist — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #4 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Obstetrician and Gynecologist Jobs →

16. Surgeon — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #2 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Surgeon Jobs →

18. Chiropractor

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.6/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $70,340
Other Rankings: #44 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Chiropractor Jobs →

19. Podiatrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.9/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $126,240
Other Rankings: #18 in Best Paying Jobs, #46 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Podiatrist Jobs →

20. Optometrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.5/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $115,250
Other Rankings: #22 in Best Paying Jobs, #48 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Optometrist Jobs →

How do you feel about the rankings? Does your job seem like it’s the “best”? The worst? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.