Kick Off Your 2020 Job Search with These Awesome NP, PA Jobs

If your New Year’s resolution is to find a new job, take a look at this list of awesome NP and PA openings we compiled to get you started.

The ball has dropped and 2020 is here and, if you are like scores of others, the new year brings with it the resolution to find a new job. Perhaps you have stagnated in your current role, or you are seeking a position with higher pay or a more flexible schedule, or maybe this is the year you want to really mix things up and dive into travel assignments. Whatever the reason you are pursuing a change, we are behind you. Ready your résumé and take a look at some of the excellent opportunities available on our site to start your 2020 job search strong.

Nurse Practitioner Openings:

Don’t see what you’re looking for? Click here to see thousands of available NP jobs.

Physician Assistant Openings:

Not the exact right fit? See thousands of other openings for PAs by clicking here.

Nurse Practitioner or Physician Assistant Openings:

Don’t see your dream job? Click here to see all available jobs on our site.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our Top 5 Advanced Practice Articles of 2019

As the year comes to a close, we thought it would be a good time to take a look back on our most popular advanced practice articles of 2019. Read them here.

As 2019 comes to a close, we thought it would be a good time to look back at our most popular articles of 2019. Given they all racked up a good amount of views, there’s a chance you might’ve seen some of them before. However, take a look at the list below for our top five most popular blogs, in case you missed some of these great reads the first time around.

1. How Much PAs and NPs Make in Every State


How much do PAs and NPs make across the U.S.? We found out. How does your salary stack up against the average?
Read More →

2. How to Cope When You Hate Your Job


Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.
Read More →

3. Yet Another Physician Speaks Out Against PAs, NPs


As the physician shortage worsens, there is no shortage of physicians speaking out against the idea of PAs and NPs being comparable substitutes.
Read More →

4. Female PAs Still Paid Less than Male PAs


Female PAs earn $.91 to every dollar male PAs earn according to the newly released findings from the AAPA’s annual salary survey.
Read More →

5. 5 Reasons to Give Travel Positions a Try


For those with a sense of adventure, travel positions need no other selling point. If you don’t have a natural love of travel, though, here are five other reasons to consider travel assignments.
Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

On Call on Christmas? Here’s How to Cope.

If you celebrate Christmas and find yourself on the schedule, here are four ways to cope with being on call during the holiday.

If you work in the medical field, particularly in a hospital setting, having to work on Christmas is not out of the question. While a lot of private practices and clinics will close their doors for the holiday, hospitals do not have holiday hours. After all, illnesses and injuries strike indiscriminately, and they do not have a habit of checking the calendar before they do.

Though many who work during the Christmas holiday may be of a religion that does not celebrate it, or those who haven’t a family to celebrate with, if you do celebrate and find yourself on the schedule, here are four ways to cope with being on call for Christmas.

Remember the Reason for the Season

To many, the reason for the season is found in the importance of giving. From the presents tucked under the tree to the time spent with loved ones, giving is woven throughout the Christmas holiday. By working on Christmas, you are giving, as well. Not only to the patients you are treating, but also to your coworkers who you are “taking one for the team” for by allowing them to spend the holiday outside of the hospital. That surely makes you feel just a little merry.

Reschedule the Holiday

No one says you absolutely, without question, have to celebrate Christmas when everyone else does. Make your own traditions for the years you end up on call—celebrate Christmas Eve on the Eve of the Eve, open presents the day after Christmas. Your family is already likely used to being flexible, given your career, and they will be just as thrilled to celebrate with you a day early, or a day late, as they would be to celebrate with you right on time.

Give Yourself Something To Look Forward To

If you are on the schedule for Christmas, there is a fairly high probability that you will not have to work on other big holidays, such as New Year’s Eve or Valentine’s Day. Give yourself (and/or your likely very understanding spouse, if you have one) something to look forward to and make plans for the days you won’t have to work. The gratification may not be instantaneous, but it may boost your spirits just enough to get you through your shift.

Celebrate with Your Work “Family”

It takes a lot of people to staff a hospital, even on a holiday. Those people are in the same position as you, and all of you can find some comfort in that. Spread a little cheer by celebrating together with a potluck, catered meal, or Secret Santa type of gift exchange. Even if Christmas isn’t your holiday, a good meal or a fun gift can go a long way to get you through a shift.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

AAPA Leaders Welcome German Minister of Health at Bellevue in New York

Last month, the President and Chair of AAPA’s Board of Directors, Dave Mittman, sat down with the German Minister of Health and the founder of the German PA profession to showcase the PA profession.

By Dave Mittman, PA, DFAAPA, President and Chair of AAPA’s Board of Directors

Nothing makes me prouder than showing off the PA profession, especially to folks visiting the U.S. from other countries. While PA practice varies from nation to nation, we all have common interests including a passion for providing the very best healthcare to people who need it.

On Thursday, November 21, AAPA Past-President Jonathan E. Sobel, DMSc, MBA, PA-C, DFAAPA, FAPACVS, and I had the privilege of representing AAPA at a unique gathering at Bellevue Hospital in New York.

There, with PAs who work at Bellevue, we hosted Dr. Marcus Hoffman, MD, founder of the German PA profession, and Dr. Heiner Garg, Minister of Social Affairs, Health, Youth, Family and Senior Citizens of the Land of Schleswig-Holstein – one of Germany’s 16 states.

Both came to see for themselves the fine work PAs do at Bellevue Hospital, one of the oldest and most famous public hospitals in the U.S. After a tour of the Emergency Department and ICU floor, a number of PAs shared their professional stories during a roundtable, providing color to the diverse experiences PAs have here in the U.S.

A personal highlight for me was when the medical director of Bellevue Hospital called PAs “the scaffolding that holds up our hospital.”

We thank Bellevue and their excellent staff for their gracious hospitality, as well as David Lizotte, PA-C, FAPACVS, who worked to put the meeting together and plan the visit.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

10 Things to Put on Your Holiday Wish List as a PA or NP

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa—no matter what you celebrate this holiday season, here is a list of ten awesome items to put on your wish list as a PA or NP.

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa—no matter what you celebrate this holiday season, here is a list of ten awesome items to put on your wish list as a PA or NP. From ultra-practical shoes to adorable bandage badge reels, there is something for everyone.

3M Littmann Classic III Monitoring Stethoscope
Easily one of the most trusted tools you can have in your arsenal.
Rating: 4.7 out of 5
Promising Review: “On the recommendation of a Doc that I work with, I ordered this stethoscope and WOW!! I’m so impressed with the Classic III’s acoustic sensitivity. I get the clearest heart, lung and bowel sounds without any of the light vs firm pressure nonsense of the Lightweight S.E.”

CHEROKEE Infinity Mid Rise Tapered Leg Jogger Pant
Is there anything better than a super comfortable pair of scrubs? We don’t think so.
Rating: 4.4 out of 5
Promising Review: “IN LOVE with these jogger scrubs. They are very comfortable and I love the material. Nothing sticks to it (including my dog’s hair). I’ve gotten so many compliments with these scrubs.”

Before Patients, After Patients 11 oz Coffee Mug and 15 oz Stemless Wine Glass Set
Because patients. Fuel up and wind down with this mug and wine glass combo.
Rating: 5 out of 5
Promising Review: “A bit of humor a whole lot of truth. I am a retired RN and I certainly would have loved receiving this as a gift.”

Ninja Hot and Cold Brewed System, Auto-iQ Tea and Coffee Maker
So you’ll have something to put in your “Before Patients” mug.
Rating: 4.6 out of 5
Promising Review: “I love this machine so much! It is easy to use; looks nice sitting on my counter; and makes a great cup of coffee. I like that I can easily make a large pot of coffee or just one cup. Plus I can make almost any type of coffee there is!”

PhoneSoap 3 UV Smartphone Sanitizer & Universal Charger
Because germs are everywhere when you work in healthcare.
Rating: 4.4 out of 5
Promising Review: “Bought this along with a set of agar plates to test it for ourselves. We swabbed my daughter’s and husband’s phones before and after use. It does work. We are very happy with the product.”

Bandage Badge Reel
I mean, come on. Could they get any cuter?
Rating: 4.7 out of 5
Promising Review: “These are SO CUTE and my patients absolutely love them. My co-workers love them too. 10/10 recommend to anyone.”

A Simpler Time Nurse Practitioner Wood Sign with Personalized Nameboard
Perfect for any NP run practice.
Rating: 4.7 out of 5
Promising Review: “The MOST beautiful piece of work! The name is not only printed, but etched into the wood. The subtle elegant details are breathtaking. The way that the sign looks incredibly professional, yet shows a little humor, is a perfect compliment in our office. I cannot recommend this piece enough!”

The One-Minute Gratitude Journal
Cultivate an attitude of gratitude in just one minute a day.
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
Promising Review: “Absolutely love this. It is simple and straightforward, with the same prompt for each day. It allows you to write in the day & date of each entry and also has blank pages for brain dumping or doodling. Highly recommend this to anyone who seeks gratitude for the little and big things alike.”

Dansko Women’s Professional Mule
Comfortable and durable shoes are an absolute must-have.
Rating: 4.3 out of 5
Promising Review: “I have resisted the traditional “nurse shoe” for a long time, but I have come to realize there is a reason so many of my nurse and physician cohorts have chosen this shoe. Time (and body fluids) will tell how well they hold up. Just wearing them around the house, I can feel a definite difference in support. The platform will take a little getting used to.”

My Quotable Patients – The Funniest Things Patients Say: A Journal
Hopefully, one day, you’ll look back on every hilarious thing a patient has said and smile.
Rating: 4.8 out of 5
Promising Review: “Bought as a gift for my husband’s cousin who graduated nursing school. I think this is a super cute book for those memorable patients who are the reason why they chose to go in this career.”

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.

This Year, Advanced Practitioners Are Thankful For…

We asked and you answered: what has your career in healthcare made you most thankful for? Here are ten of our favorite responses.

We asked and you answered: what has your career in healthcare made you most thankful for? We received a lot of great responses—some heartwarming, some hilarious, all valid reasons to be grateful—and we picked our top ten favorite answers to feature this week. Here they are.

This job isn’t always easy, but to know that I have been able to change lives for the better will always be something I will be thankful for. —Valerie P.

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I am grateful for my colleagues for keeping me sane and constantly pushing me to do better. —Erika B.

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I am proud to be an NP and help change and shape what healthcare looks like in my community and across the country. I’m definitely grateful for that. —Ariel L.

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I’m continually learning in my job and I’m thankful for that. It’s never boring and it always keeps me on my toes. —Katherine H.

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This year and every year, I am grateful to do what I love, alongside people I respect and admire, and that I get to enjoy every day at my job, even the hard ones. —Courtney K.

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My job is never boring and I’m grateful for that. Even if it seems like it would be nice to be bored sometimes. It sure beats the alternative. —Coral C.

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I’m grateful for the bonds I’ve been able to form with the people I work with and my longtime patients. —Michael R.

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I’ve seen patients in some truly bad spots in life. I’m grateful to have been able to help them go on to lead better, healthier lives. That’s rewarding as hell. —Paula P.

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I took on my first travel assignment this year and I’m so thankful I did. What a blessing that has been. So glad I chose a profession that lets me do this. —Jordan C.

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Let’s be honest here: I’m thankful for my salary. —Jamie P.

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No matter what you are thankful for this year, we are thankful for you and all you do. Happy Thanksgiving from our family to yours.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

PA Week: 3 Ways to Celebrate

Happy PA Week from all of us at HealthJobsNationwide.com. Here are three ways to celebrate the PA profession, while also raising awareness.

National PA Week, which takes place annually from October 6th through the 12th, aims to not only celebrate Physician Assistants, but to also educate the public on the value PAs add to our nation’s health.

Here are three ways to celebrate the profession, while also raising awareness.

Get Social

Raise awareness for PAs by using the hashtag #PAWeek on social media while you celebrate your profession and peers. One idea is to share the AAPA produced “Your PA Can Handle It” video with your network. Or give the public an idea of all being a PA entails by doing a day-in-the-life series of posts.

Be Political

Advocate for PAs on Capitol Hill by joining the only federal healthcare Political Action Committee (PA PAC) dedicated to advancing the profession. To learn more about or to join the PA PAC, please click here.

Give Back

A great way to create a tangible difference for PAs nationwide is to make a small monetary donation to programs that empower PAs to improve patient care in the communities they serve. Donate during PA Week to the PA Foundation by clicking here.

No matter how you celebrate this PA Week, know that all of us at HealthJobsNationwide.com are celebrating with you and we are so thankful for all you do to improve the health of our nation, not only this week, but throughout the year.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Burnout Isn’t Just a Physician Problem

NPs and PAs are often touted as the solution to the growing primary care physician shortage, but at what cost? Burnout impacts them, too.

The growing primary care physician shortage has put an overwhelming strain on doctors in the United States, often in the form of burnout. A combined workforce of nearly 400,000 strong, Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants have been poised and ready to be, and often touted as, the most viable solution to the shortage. But at what cost? After all, NPs and PAs are not immune to burning out, themselves.

According to the International Classification of Diseases, which now classifies burnout as an occupational phenomenon, burnout is defined as “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” Those suffering from burnout often experience feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion, increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job, and reduced professional efficacy.

Last fall, the Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants published the first report on national trends of burnout among PAs. The data revealed that 62.1% of PAs had enthusiasm for their work, while 21.4% reported some degree of cynicism, and 10.4% reported a low sense of personal accomplishment. The report also revealed that 12.8% had never left a position due to stress, but were considering quitting their current position due to stress, burnout, or a toxic workplace, and that 30% had quit once in the past due to stress. Another 11.7% of PAs had left more than one position due to burnout.

As for Nurse Practitioners, burnout in the nursing profession, as a whole, is well-documented. Nurses experience some of the highest risk and rate of burnout, with a third of all nurses in the U.S. reporting high levels of emotional exhaustion. Though Nurse Practitioners may outrank RNs, they seem to be experiencing similar levels of burnout. For instance, though the NP profession ranked #7 on U.S. News & World Report’s 100 Best Jobs list in 2019, it was also reported that NP experience above average stress and below average work-life balance.

Are you feeling burnt out in your role as an NP or PA? How do you combat work-related stress? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

States with the Most Jobs for PAs and NPs

Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners are some of the most in-demand healthcare professionals in the nation, but where is demand highest?

Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners are some of the most in-demand healthcare professionals in the nation, but where, in particular, is that demand? We analyzed data on our site and came up with the three states with the most available openings for PAs and NPs right now, as well as a selection of noteworthy openings for each position type.

Nurse Practitioners

1. California

Number of NP Jobs Available in California: 427

Average Annual NP Salary in California: $126,890

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search NP Jobs in California

2. New York

Number of NP Jobs Available in New York: 350

Average Annual NP Salary in New York: $118,550

Noteworthy Openings in New York:

Click Here to Search NP Jobs in New York

3. Washington

Number of NP Jobs Available in Washington: 235

Average Annual NP Salary in Washington: $116,350

Noteworthy Openings in Washington:

Click Here to Search NP Jobs in Washington

Physician Assistants

1. California

Number of PA Jobs Available in California: 207

Average Annual PA Salary in California: $118,500

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search PA Jobs in California

2. New York

Number of PA Jobs Available in New York: 116

Average Annual PA Salary in New York: $117,060

Noteworthy Openings in New York:

Click Here to Search PA Jobs in New York

3. Connecticut

Number of PA Jobs Available in Connecticut: 71

Average Annual PA Salary in Connecticut: $126,320

Noteworthy Openings in Connecticut:

Click Here to Search PA Jobs in Connecticut

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How Do You Deal with “I Want to See a Doctor”?

What do you do when a patient has the audacity to say, “I want to see a real doctor,” thus calling into question your qualifications?

By Jessica Levinson

Earlier this year, while working the front desk in a specialist’s office that employed PAs, MDs, and DOs, it was a sentence I heard pretty frequently—“I want to see a doctor, not a PA.”

Though we followed company policy and told patients they would be seeing an advanced practitioner during scheduling, and though there was a clearly displayed sign in the waiting room informing patients that the practice employed PAs and NPs, patients would often claim they were not made aware and often said that they never would have scheduled an appointment and that they would not have wasted their time coming to the appointment, if they knew they were not seeing a physician, often in more colorful language.

Having written scores of articles for this very blog about the comparable or better care advanced practitioners provide, I cringed every time—while I also tried to convince patients to keep their appointments and see the advanced practitioner on staff. Sometimes, it worked. Sometimes, it didn’t. Mostly, I wondered how PAs and NPs dealt with the question themselves.

I asked one of the PAs on staff this very question. She said, in summation, “I’m not going to force them to see me. If they want to see a doctor, they’re welcome to. It’s just going to be a few weeks before they can get that appointment.”

As the physician shortage continues to grow and, in turn, to leave gaps in access to care, her sentiment seemed pretty spot on. Often, when scheduling patients, I was able to offer same day appointments with the PA or NP, but would need to look as far as three weeks out for a ten-minute time slot with the MD.

To me, it is more important to have whatever my medical issue is handled by someone who knows more than myself and a Google search, no matter their title. However, some will continue to want to be cared for exclusively by physicians. When they do, how do you find yourself responding? Tell us in the comments below.


Jessica Levinson is HealthJobsNationwide.com’s Social Media Manager and Brand Ambassador, who also moonlights as a best-selling poet and freelance writer.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.