How to Use Healthcare Job Boards More Effectively

It used to be that using a healthcare job board required very little effort above and beyond posting your resume and waiting for responses. Many job seekers still do that today. However, the most successful use healthcare job boards differently. They do more than post their resumes and wait.

 As far as job boards go, Health Jobs Nationwide is among the best. We are comfortable saying that because of the tens of thousands of listings we offer along with the well-known, reputable companies who post their jobs with us. Still, the quality of our job board alone will not get you hired. There is more to it.

 The good news is that we won’t leave you hanging. Below are strategies for helping you utilize healthcare job boards more effectively. Ultimately, our goal is to be your gateway to the physician, nurse practitioner, or registered nurse position you are looking for.

 1. Practice Different Filtering Methods

 Healthcare job boards like ours tend to offer multiple filtering methods. We do this because job applicants have different ways of searching. What must be understood is that our filters are heavily dependent on the data posters enter. This means that not every job that could be appropriate to your search will turn up under all your filters.

 From a practical standpoint, you may have to utilize several different filters. Don’t stress over it. Just practice utilizing different filters to see the results they turn up. With enough practice, you will know exactly how to search every time you log on.

 2. Take Advantage of Employer ATS

 Healthcare employers receive so many resumes that they just don’t have the resources to manually look through each and every one. So these days, they use automated systems known as applicant tracking systems (ATS) to narrow down potential candidates. Out of 500 resumes, perhaps only 30-50 will be actually viewed by human eyes.

 You increase your chances of getting your resume seen by understanding and taking advantage of ATS. For starters, always send your resume and CV in .pdf format. That’s the one format most ATS systems can read. If you submit a .docx, your resume may not make it past the first level.

 Next, don’t use tables, text boxes, etc. Most ATS systems cannot read the data contained in boxes and tables, so that data will be ignored. However, do use formatting – like headings, for example. An ATS can recognize headings like ‘Education’, ‘Work History’, and so forth.

 Finally, use the right keywords. ATS systems are a lot like search engines in that they look for keywords to understand a document. Use keywords that are appropriate to the type of job you are looking for. If you’re not sure what those keywords are, look in the job description of a particular post. That will tell you everything you need to know.

 3. Make Proactive Contact

 Finally, the one thing about job seeking that hasn’t changed is the need to be proactive. After you submit your resume and CV to a particular employer, try to make contact with someone in that organization. A common suggestion among job coaches is to look up the employer on LinkedIn. You might find an HR officer, healthcare administrator, or someone else you can connect with. A simple note of introduction is all you need.

 Healthcare job boards are a fantastic resource for finding career opportunities across the country. Whether you are looking to stay local, or you are prepared to move, don’t just submit your resume and wait. Utilize the three strategies described in this post and you’ll increase the chances of finding a great job.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where PT, OT, SLP, & RT Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Therapy roles are generally known to come with decent pay, but where are PTs, OTs, SLPs, and RTs earning the most and the least? Find out here.

Therapy roles are generally known to come with a decent wage, often ranking on lists of “Best Paying Jobs” both within and outside of healthcare.

Considering physical, occupational, speech, and respiratory therapists are highly-skilled, in-demand healthcare workers, this should not be surprising. However, where they are paid the highest and the lowest salaries may surprise you.

Below are the 10 states where PTs, OTs, SLPs, and RTs make the most and the least, on average, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Physical Therapists – Highest Paying States

  1. Nevada – $108,580
  2. California – $104,500
  3. Alaska – $101,190
  4. New Jersey – $100,740
  5. Connecticut – $100,580
  6. New Mexico – $98,580
  7. Delaware – $97,260
  8. Illinois – $97,060
  9. District of Columbia – $96,090
  10. Virginia – $94,370

Physical Therapists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $78,850
  2. Vermont – $81,580
  3. Idaho – $82,470
  4. Maine – $83,380
  5. Iowa – $83,640
  6. Arkansas – $84,410
  7. Montana – $84,600
  8. South Carolina – $84,640
  9. Missouri – $84,660
  10. North Dakota – $84,880

Occupational Therapists – Highest Paying States

  1. Nevada – $111,270
  2. California – $101,080
  3. Arizona – $99,950
  4. New Jersey – $98,750
  5. District of Columbia – $96,330
  6. Virginia – $95,170
  7. Alaska – $93,980
  8. Rhode Island – $93,330
  9. Connecticut – $92,000
  10. Colorado – $91,650

Occupational Therapists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Maine – $72,500
  2. North Dakota – $73,280
  3. South Dakota – $74,580
  4. Vermont – $75,330
  5. Montana – $76,200
  6. Wisconsin – $76,850
  7. Michigan – $77,600
  8. Minnesota – $77,790
  9. Missouri – $78,660
  10. South Carolina – $79,840

Speech-Language Pathologists – Highest Paying States

  1. District of Columbia – $101,920
  2. Connecticut – $100,590
  3. New Jersey – $100,330
  4. New York – $98,010
  5. California – $95,570
  6. Virginia – $92,520
  7. Colorado – $91,200
  8. Oregon – $87,850
  9. Rhode Island – $87,270
  10. Alaska – $87,250

Speech-Language Pathologists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $59,270
  2. Alabama – $66,400
  3. West Virginia – $67,010
  4. Mississippi – $67,250
  5. North Dakota – $67,790
  6. Maine – $69,250
  7. South Carolina – $71,340
  8. Nebraska – $71,940
  9. Montana – $72,220
  10. Idaho – $72,390

Respiratory Therapists – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $87,190
  2. District of Columbia – $82,940
  3. New York – $79,840
  4. Hawaii – $77,930
  5. Nevada – $77,380
  6. Massachusetts – $76,270
  7. Washington – $75,380
  8. New Jersey – $74,710
  9. Alaska – $74,390
  10. Oregon – $72,340

Respiratory Therapists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Mississippi – $51,480
  2. Kentucky – $51,800
  3. Alabama – $51,820
  4. West Virginia – $52,400
  5. South Dakota – $53,610
  6. Tennessee – $54,310
  7. Louisiana – $55,720
  8. Iowa – $56,260
  9. Arkansas – $56,400
  10. Georgia – $56,750

Ready to start your search for a higher paying therapy job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where Healthcare Support Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Working in healthcare has always garnered a lot of respect, especially over the last year. But is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Working in healthcare can garner a lot of respect, as we’ve certainly seen over the last year with many in the industry being hailed as heroes for working on the frontlines of the pandemic.

However, is the pay proportionate to the praise?

Below are the ten states offering the highest and the lowest average salaries for ten popular healthcare support professions, listed alphabetically, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $108,400
  2. Hawaii – $101,570
  3. Alaska – $95,990
  4. District of Columbia – $94,260
  5. Rhode Island – $92,460
  6. Washington – $92,150
  7. Oregon – $91,550
  8. Massachusetts – $89,080
  9. Wisconsin – $86,810
  10. Colorado – $86,370

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $57,870
  2. Georgia – $61,100
  3. Mississippi – $62,600
  4. West Virginia – $62,920
  5. Louisiana – $63,520
  6. Arkansas – $64,670
  7. South Dakota – $64,840
  8. Tennessee – $65,750
  9. Michigan – $66,020
  10. Kentucky – $67,520

EMTs & Paramedics – Highest Paying States

  1. Hawaii – $58,580
  2. Washington – $56,910
  3. Maryland – $53,440
  4. Alaska – $50,030
  5. California – $48,280
  6. Illinois – $48,040
  7. District of Columbia – $47,460
  8. New York – $46,920
  9. Massachusetts – $46,110
  10. Connecticut – $45,800

EMTs & Paramedics – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $30,520
  2. Alabama – $30,770
  3. Kansas – $31,500
  4. Kentucky – $32,030
  5. Mississippi – $32,250
  6. South Dakota – $33,110
  7. Montana – $34,090
  8. Michigan – $34,410
  9. Arkansas – $34,630
  10. Ohio – $34,680

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $35,360
  2. North Dakota – $34,020
  3. Massachusetts – $33,890
  4. Vermont – $33,810
  5. Washington – $32,860
  6. New York – $32,140
  7. District of Columbia – $31,810
  8. California – $31,270
  9. Rhode Island – $30,790
  10. Oregon – $30,730

Home Health & Personal Care Aides – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $19,800
  2. Alabama – $20,960
  3. Mississippi – $21,520
  4. West Virginia – $21,730
  5. Texas – $21,750
  6. Oklahoma – $22,320
  7. North Carolina – $22,920
  8. Tennessee – $23,130
  9. Virginia – $23,360
  10. Arkansas – $23,510

Medical Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $46,610
  2. Washington – $45,700
  3. District of Columbia – $45,340
  4. Massachusetts – $43,090
  5. Minnesota – $43,090
  6. California – $42,990
  7. Oregon – $41,700
  8. Connecticut – $41,070
  9. Hawaii – $40,530
  10. New York – $39,850

Medical Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. West Virginia – $29,820
  2. Alabama – $29,950
  3. Mississippi – $30,550
  4. Louisiana – $31,110
  5. Arkansas – $31,530
  6. Oklahoma – $31,790
  7. South Dakota – $31,910
  8. Kansas – $32,030
  9. New Mexico – $32,340
  10. South Carolina – $33,010

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. District of Columbia – $47,110
  2. California – $46,140
  3. Washington – $45,990
  4. Massachusetts – $44,900
  5. Rhode Island – $43,740
  6. Hawaii – $43,620
  7. New Jersey – $43,130
  8. Minnesota – $42,730
  9. Oregon – $42,550
  10. New York – $42,170

Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Mississippi – $30,980
  2. Louisiana – $32,680
  3. West Virginia – $32,940
  4. Tennessee – $33,460
  5. Montana – $33,550
  6. New Mexico – $33,710
  7. Kentucky – $34,080
  8. Oklahoma – $34,200
  9. Wyoming – $35,110
  10. Florida – $35,150

Nursing Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $42,500
  2. New York – $40,620
  3. California – $39,280
  4. Hawaii – $38,650
  5. Massachusetts – $37,160
  6. Oregon – $37,100
  7. District of Columbia – $36,980
  8. Washington – $36,310
  9. Minnesota – $36,040
  10. North Dakota – $35,510

Nursing Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Louisiana – $24,300
  2. Mississippi – $24,400
  3. Alabama – $25,600
  4. Arkansas – $26,550
  5. Oklahoma – $27,220
  6. Missouri – $27,720
  7. South Carolina – $27,760
  8. North Carolina – $27,800
  9. Tennessee – $27,940
  10. Kentucky – $27,980

Pharmacy Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,620
  2. Alaska – $46,430
  3. Washington – $46,400
  4. District of Columbia – $46,240
  5. Oregon – $43,410
  6. Hawaii – $42,300
  7. North Dakota – $41,390
  8. Minnesota – $39,770
  9. Nevada – $39,390
  10. Wyoming – $39,330

Pharmacy Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Kentucky – $30,370
  2. Alabama – $30,980
  3. Arkansas – $31,010
  4. Pennsylvania – $31,760
  5. West Virginia – $31,890
  6. Georgia – $32,160
  7. Ohio – $32,520
  8. Oklahoma – $32,900
  9. North Carolina – $33,300
  10. Missouri – $33,670

Phlebotomists – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $47,230
  2. New York – $44,630
  3. District of Columbia – $43,960
  4. Alaska – $43,270
  5. Washington – $42,530
  6. Massachusetts – $42,030
  7. Connecticut – $41,170
  8. Oregon – $40,560
  9. Delaware – $40,520
  10. Maryland – $40,300

Phlebotomists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $29,050
  2. Louisiana – $30,600
  3. Arkansas – $31,120
  4. Oklahoma – $31,400
  5. Mississippi – $31,640
  6. Missouri – $31,830
  7. Kentucky – $32,190
  8. Tennessee – $32,210
  9. Maine – $32,380
  10. Iowa – $32,430

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $95,010
  2. Hawaii – $82,990
  3. District of Columbia – $82,270
  4. Alaska – $79,330
  5. Massachusetts – $78,830
  6. Washington – $77,310
  7. Oregon – $76,520
  8. Rhode Island – $74,670
  9. New York – $73,150
  10. Connecticut – $72,470

Radiologic Technologists & Technicians – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $47,300
  2. Mississippi – $48,100
  3. Arkansas – $52,290
  4. Tennessee – $53,030
  5. Kentucky – $53,090
  6. Iowa – $53,400
  7. Louisiana – $53,610
  8. West Virginia – $53,690
  9. South Dakota – $54,610
  10. Kansas – $55,770

Surgical Technologists – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $67,120
  2. Nevada – $67,000
  3. California – $64,570
  4. Connecticut – $62,310
  5. District of Columbia – $61,620
  6. Minnesota – $61,300
  7. Washington – $60,450
  8. Oregon – $59,480
  9. Rhode Island – $59,410
  10. New York – $59,380

Surgical Technologists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $38,660
  2. West Virginia – $39,890
  3. Mississippi – $41,520
  4. Louisiana – $42,140
  5. Arkansas – $42,390
  6. Iowa – $43,780
  7. South Carolina – $43,880
  8. Kentucky – $44,180
  9. Tennessee – $44,540
  10. South Dakota – $44,700

Ready to start your search for a higher paying healthcare job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where Nurse Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Over the past year, nurses were highly-praised, often being called heroes for their efforts during the pandemic. But were they being paid hero-type wages?

Nurses were, without a doubt, one of the most talked about professions over the last year. As the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the nation, nurses dashed to the frontlines, and were called heroes time and time again for doing so. But were they being paid hero-level wages?

Below are the 10 states where nurses earned the most and the least, on average, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Registered Nurses – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $120,560
  2. Hawaii – $104,830
  3. Massachusetts – $96,250
  4. Oregon – $96,230
  5. Alaska – $95,270
  6. Washington – $91,310
  7. District of Columbia – $90,050
  8. New York – $89,760
  9. Nevada – $89,750
  10. New Jersey – $85,720

Registered Nurses – Lowest Paying States

  1. Alabama – $60,230
  2. South Dakota – $60,960
  3. Mississippi – $61,250
  4. Iowa – $62,570
  5. Arkansas – $63,640
  6. Tennessee – $64,120
  7. Kansas – $64,200
  8. Kentucky – $64,730
  9. West Virginia – $65,130
  10. Missouri – $65,900

Ready to start your search for a higher paying nursing job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where NP, PA, & CRNA Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Advanced practice roles are typically known to be well-paying, but where are NPs, PAs, and CRNAs making the most? The least? Find out here.

Advanced practice roles are typically known to be well-paying, often ranking high on lists of “Best Paying Jobs” both within and outside of healthcare.

This should not be surprising, considering nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and certified registered nurse anesthetists are highly-skilled, in-demand healthcare workers. However, where they are paid the highest and the lowest salaries may surprise you.

Below are the 10 states where NPs, PAs, and CRNAs make the most and the least, on average, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Nurse Practitioners – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $145,970
  2. New Jersey – $130,890
  3. Washington – $126,480
  4. New York – $126,440
  5. Massachusetts – $126,050
  6. Nevada – $119,890
  7. Minnesota – $118,900
  8. Wyoming – $118,810
  9. Hawaii – $118,780
  10. Oregon – $118,600

Nurse Practitioners – Lowest Paying States

  1. Tennessee – $99,370
  2. Alabama – $99,790
  3. Florida – $101,060
  4. South Carolina – $101,190
  5. Kentucky – $102,460
  6. South Dakota – $103,080
  7. Kansas – $104,530
  8. West Virginia – $105,220
  9. Ohio – $105,630
  10. Arkansas – $106,210

Physician Assistants – Highest Paying States

  1. Alaska – $150,430
  2. Connecticut – $146,110
  3. Rhode Island – $135,800
  4. California – $135,180
  5. Nevada – $134,710
  6. New Jersey – $131,210
  7. Washington – $129,910
  8. Vermont – $128,050
  9. New York – $126,370
  10. New Hampshire – $124,080

Physician Assistants – Lowest Paying States

  1. Kentucky – $79,390
  2. Mississippi – $85,380
  3. Alabama – $88,500
  4. Louisiana – $93,770
  5. Missouri – $94,020
  6. Tennessee – $101,640
  7. Arkansas – $101,740
  8. Indiana – $102,030
  9. South Carolina – $103,150
  10. Georgia – $104,230

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists – Highest Paying States

  1. Oregon – $236,540
  2. Wisconsin – $231,520
  3. Wyoming – $231,250
  4. Nevada – $223,680
  5. Connecticut – $217,360
  6. New York – $217,050
  7. Montana – $216,420
  8. Minnesota – $216,050
  9. New Jersey – $207,500
  10. California – $205,360

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Utah – $127,130
  2. Idaho – $156,250
  3. Louisiana – $161,310
  4. Kentucky – $163,700
  5. New Mexico – $164,980
  6. Arkansas – $167,030
  7. Kansas – $167,700
  8. Indiana – $169,620
  9. Alabama – $170,560
  10. Tennessee – $171,020

Ready to start your search for a higher paying advanced practice job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

These Are the Best Healthcare Jobs in America

Healthcare professionals have received a lot of praise over the last year, often being lauded as heroes. But which healthcare jobs ranked as the best?

Those who work in healthcare have always known how essential their jobs are. The rest of the world learned this in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold and forever changed the way the healthcare profession will be viewed by the general public. Physicians and Registered Nurses, in particular, were heaped with praise, becoming the heroes of our nation and the world.

But which healthcare jobs are best? Not the most celebrated or well-recognized, but the best—best for salary, work-life balance, stress level, the job market, and future growth. U.S. News & World Report released their annual rankings based on these very metrics. The 20 best healthcare jobs according to their findings are listed below.

1. Physician Assistant

Overall Score: 8.3 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.4/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $112,260
Other Rankings: #1 in 100 Best Jobs, #1 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Physician Assistant Jobs →

2. Nurse Practitioner

Overall Score: 8.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 10/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $109,820
Other Rankings: #3 in 100 Best Jobs, #3 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs →

3. Physician

Overall Score: 7.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $206,500
Other Rankings: #5 in 100 Best Jobs, #8 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Physician Jobs →

4. Speech-Language Pathologist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $79,120
Other Rankings: #7 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Speech-Language Pathologist Jobs →

5. Dentist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 9.9/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $155,600
Other Rankings: #7 in Best STEM Jobs, #9 in 100 Best Jobs, #11 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Dentist Jobs →

6. Veterinarian

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $95,460
Other Rankings: #10 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Veterinarian Jobs →

7. Orthodontist

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 8/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #5 in Best Paying Jobs, #8 in Best STEM Jobs, #11 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Orthodontist Jobs →

8. Anesthesiologist

Overall Score: 7.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #1 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Anesthesiologist Jobs →

9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #3 in Best Paying Jobs, #18 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Jobs →

10. Occupational Therapist

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $84,950
Other Rankings: #19 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Occupational Therapist Jobs →

11. Physical Therapist

Overall Score: 6.9 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.5/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $89,440
Other Rankings: #21 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Physical Therapist Jobs →

12. Psychiatrist

Overall Score: 6.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 6/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #7 in Best Paying Jobs, #27 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Psychiatrist Jobs →

13. Prosthodontist

Overall Score: 6.7 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #6 in Best Paying Jobs, #35 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Prosthodontist Jobs →

14. Registered Nurse

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.8/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $73,300
Other Rankings: #37 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Registered Nurse Jobs →

15. Nurse Anesthetist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $174,790
Other Rankings: #10 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in Best STEM Jobs, #39 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Nurse Anesthetist Jobs →

16. Obstetrician and Gynecologist — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #4 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Obstetrician and Gynecologist Jobs →

16. Surgeon — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #2 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Surgeon Jobs →

18. Chiropractor

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.6/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $70,340
Other Rankings: #44 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Chiropractor Jobs →

19. Podiatrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.9/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $126,240
Other Rankings: #18 in Best Paying Jobs, #46 in 100 Best Jobs
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20. Optometrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.5/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $115,250
Other Rankings: #22 in Best Paying Jobs, #48 in 100 Best Jobs
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How do you feel about the rankings? Does your job seem like it’s the “best”? The worst? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Prepare to Negotiate Your Salary

Being an in-demand provider doesn’t mean you’ll automatically be paid well. Here are a few tips to prepare you for when it’s time to negotiate your salary.

Being an in-demand healthcare provider—a physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, registered nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist, or myriad other titles—does not mean you will automatically be a well-paid one, as well. However, being in-demand does often mean that you are in a unique position in terms of bargaining power, and can negotiate for what you want and so rightly deserve. Here are a few tips to follow to be prepared when the time comes to negotiate.

1. Know Your Worth

When it comes to negotiating your salary, it is absolutely critical that you know your worth, both personally, based on your experience and specialized skill set, and in terms of your market value.

Use your current and former salaries, salary reports that are available online, or even buck the taboo and talk to your peers about what they are earning, and create a salary range for yourself. The low end should be the absolute minimum you would seriously consider and the high end should represent what you would accept without any further negotiations needed.

By basing your salary range on comparable salaries, instead of plucking numbers out of thin air, there is a greater chance that any counter offer you may need to make be seriously considered. Know that if you are preparing, they are, as well, and it’s more than likely the hiring company has also done their research and has a range of their own to consider, too.

2. Consider the Benefits

Money isn’t the only thing on the table when it comes to negotiating, and there are plenty of benefits that can provide quite a bit of value, while not moving the needle on your salary.

If the proposed salary is on the low end and the hiring company won’t budge, try negotiating for better benefits. Some benefits to attempt to fold into negotiations can include: signing bonus, education/CME allowance, flexible work schedule, PTO, insurance, retirement plans, and more.

Not everything valuable to you will have a dollar sign in front of it, so make sure you weigh every option available to you when negotiating.

3. Know You May Not Get What You Want and That’s Okay

It is one thing to know your worth and it is another, entirely, to respect it. Know that if you are going to negotiate your salary, there is a chance that negotiations may fail, and you may see just how undervalued someone in your position is to those on the other side of the table.

Know that it is okay—more than okay—to walk away from negotiations, if you are being greatly devalued and even your most basic salary needs cannot be met.

Part of being in-demand means that you have options. Make sure you explore all of them and choose the best fit for you, not just what you will settle for. You should respect yourself and your expertise enough to do that, and the right employer will respect that, as well.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

NP Workforce, Pay Has Boomed Since 2010

Nurse practitioners have long been touted as a viable solution to the U.S. physician shortage, and it seems as though they are flooding the workforce.

Nurse practitioners have long been touted as one viable solution to physician shortages in the United States, and it seems as though they are flooding the workforce, according to a new study published in Health Affairs.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at Montana State University and Dartmouth College, analyzed NP workforce data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey from 2010 through 2017.

Researchers found that the number of nurse practitioners in the United States more than doubled during that time period, up from 91,000 to 190,000, and that growth primarily occurred in hospitals, physician offices, and outpatient care clinics. It was also found that average earnings grew, as well, spiking in every setting—up from $98,269 to $101,243 in hospitals, $87,443 to $90,475 in physician offices, and $86,565 to $94,560 in outpatient clinics.

The news is not all good, however, and the growth does not come without implications. Researchers also identified that the growing NP workforce has reduced the size of the RN workforce by up to 80,000 nationwide, a field that has been struggling with its own shortages in recent years.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Gender Pay Gap Tops $36K for New Physicians

A new study has found that male physicians earn more than their female counterparts, even at the onset of their career.

A new study, which was released ahead of print by Health Affairs, shows a growing disparity in pay between new male and female physicians.

For the study, researchers collected data between 1999 and 2017 from graduating residents from the New York Survey of Residents Completing Training from the Center for Health Workforce Studies of the University of Albany, State University. Using that data, the researchers found that, over that time period, the average starting compensation for men was $235,044 and $198,426 for women, a difference of more than $36,000. They also discovered that the gap widened over time, increasing from $7,700 in 1999.

While part of the pay gap could be explained due to analyzed variables—chosen specialty (40-55%), number of job offers (2-9%), hours worked (up to 7%), and work-life balance preferences (less than 1%)—researchers could not entirely explain the disparity.

“While it is apparent that women say they place a greater premium on control over work-life balance factors, this difference does not appear to explain the observed starting salary difference, conditional on other factors,” the researchers wrote. “There may nevertheless exist workplace biases, whether intentional or unintentional, that differentially affect women irrespective of their individual stated preferences for work-life balance.”

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Highest Paying U.S. Metro Areas for PTs, OTs, & SLPs

Want to make top pay as a PT, OT, or SLP? You might want to consider looking for a job in one of these high-paying metro areas.

While the average annual salaries of PTs, OTs, and SLPS—$87,930, $84,270, and $77,510 respectively—are typically considered high-paying, salaries can vary based on location, due to cost of living and other factors.

If your 2020 job search has you considering a change in location, be it across the state or across the country, knowing which areas offer the highest pay can help you decide your next move.

Take a look at the top metro areas offering the highest average annual salaries for PTs, OTs, and SLPs as determined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics.

Highest Paying Metro Areas – Physical Therapists

  1. Ames, IA – $118,870
  2. Great Falls, MT – $116,580
  3. Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV – $115,240
  4. Yuma, AZ – $114,850
  5. Bakersfield, CA – $114,170
  6. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX – $112,500
  7. Prescott, AZ – $110,960
  8. Ithaca, NY – $110,620
  9. Morristown, TN – $108,340
  10. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA – $107,960

Highest Paying Metro Areas – Occupational Therapists

  1. Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV – $108,190
  2. Vallejo-Fairfield, CA – $106,270
  3. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA – $104,580
  4. Hattiesburg, MS – $104,250
  5. Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA – $103,120
  6. Visalia-Porterville, CA – $102,540
  7. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA – $102,480
  8. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX – $101,800
  9. Salinas, CA – $101,680
  10. Tyler, TX – $101,410

Highest Paying Metro Areas – Speech-Language Pathologists

  1. Napa, CA – $106,620
  2. Jackson, MI – $105,130
  3. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA – $103,890
  4. Vallejo-Fairfield, CA – $103,030
  5. Tulsa, OK – $102,680
  6. Wichita Falls, TX – $102,540
  7. Chico, CA – $101,990
  8. Battle Creek, MI – $101,810
  9. Gainesville, FL – $101,750
  10. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA – $101,380

Ready to start your search for a higher paying job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.