6 Tips for Launching a Medical Startup

The competition in the medical industry is fierce. Complex health care relationships, stringent legal regulations, and high-security standards can hamper new product launches. Here are six tips for kicking off a medical startup.

1. Elevate Your Skill Set

Don’t expect to become an overnight success in the healthcare industry. Your products or services must be of the highest quality and in high demand to succeed in the medical industry. Enrolling in a professional development program to learn marketable abilities may be worthwhile.

Assuming you want to start a medical coding company, you may benefit from an online professional development coursein the industry. It can prepare you to mark medical procedures and service claims with the correct codes. You’ll also be able to show off your knowledge on a final test.

2. Understand the Conservative Market

In terms of funding and growth, medical technology is one of the most promising fields. In 2020, health care costs in the United States reached $4.1 trillion, or $12,530 per person, an increase of about 10% from 2019. Research by the 2020 Commonwealth Fund estimates that health care consumes 16.9% of national income. Thus, it has the highest health care costs and the highest patient demand in the world.

3. Choose Your Business Structure

In the United States, it’s mandatory for any business, including those in the healthcare industry, to form a separate legal organization. You’ll have to select a business structure before registering your company.

A limited liability company (LLC) offers the most benefits for startups. It shields you from responsibility for the company’s debts and lawsuits, keeping your wealth safe. In addition, the LLC is subject to pass-through taxation. This means that its members, not the business, are responsible for reporting the business’s tax obligations on their tax returns. If you’re wondering how to start an LLC, research your state’s LLC requirements, then save money on attorney’s fees by completing the forms yourself or hiring a formation service to assist you.

4. Comply With HIPAA

Any medical startup with a health care website offering user profiles, archives with patient records, or online invoicing tools must adhere strictly to HIPAA regulations and secure patient health data. HIPPA protects the confidentiality of medical records. The standard guidelines specify parameters for the safe and private sharing of electronic medical records. Penalties for HIPAA violations can reach $1.5 million annually, with each event carrying a maximum fine of $50,000.

5. Build Trust for Your Medical Business

There’s a lack of trust between fledgling businesses and established companies in the healthcare industry. So, if you want to succeed in the healthcare industry, you’ll need to network with extensive hospital systems, health insurance providers, and medical device manufacturers. Having a solid business plan with a detailed road map demonstrates your business has ambitions to grow and won’t just perish after receiving seed funding.

6. Hire Employees

As you begin to build your business, one of your top priorities will be hiring the right employees to help you achieve your goals. When choosing candidates for open positions at your company, it’s important to select staff members who have the skills and qualifications needed to excel in their roles. Beyond that, you should also look for individuals who have a strong work ethic, an ability to collaborate well with others, and an interest in helping your medical startup succeed. When you’re ready to hire employees, advertise your healthcare jobs at HeathJobsNationwide.com!

Take the First Step

Starting a medical business from scratch is no small feat. Take crucial steps like choosing the best business structure, researching the market, complying with HIPAA, and hiring capable employees.

By : Stephanie Haywood of MyLifeBoost.com


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapists Among the Top 10 Highest Paid Healthcare Pros

Ask most people what the highest paying career in healthcare is and the most likely response will be physician. That’s the right response. Physicians have traditionally been the highest paid in the healthcare industry. But in the most recent MedPage Today list of top ten highest paying healthcare gigs, there are some surprises. For instance, the last two positions on that list go to therapists.

Physical therapists come in at number ten while radiation therapists take the number nine position. Both types of therapy are widely utilized throughout American healthcare to help patients dealing with a variety of health problems. If you were looking to get into healthcare but didn’t want to go the doctor or nurse route, therapy would certainly be an option.

Physical Therapists

Getting back to the MedPage Today list, physical therapists round out the top ten list with an average salary of $91,000 annually. Based on a standard 40-hour work week, physical therapists make about $44 per hour. That’s not bad.

Physical therapists help patients improve their overall health and quality of life by improving mobility, managing pain, and strengthening muscles, tendons, and ligaments. They treat patients suffering from chronic conditions and illnesses. They also help patients recover from injuries and surgeries.

Radiation Therapists

The radiation therapy career is not as well-known. Radiation therapists work alongside oncologists and other members of a patient’s healthcare team to treat cancer. It is the radiation therapist who operates radiation treatment equipment.

This is a highly skilled position that demands appropriate education and training. Radiation therapists work at hospitals or independent cancer treatment clinics, earning a salary of $94,000 annually. They make about $45 per hour based on a 40-hour work week.

If you are in one of these positions, none of this information is new. You are well acquainted with physical and radiation therapists. You also know that the demand for their services is never-ending. The question is this where will you find your next opportunity?

It Starts with the Search

Whether you are looking to change employers or get an extra gig, it all starts with the job search. As we say time and again, our organization can help you find what you are looking for. Healthjobsnationwide.com, presently, has 9k therapist jobs on the site.

Worth the Money

Physical and radiation therapists take the final two spots on the MedPage Today list of the top ten highest paid healthcare professions. They make good money, and they are worth every penny. The same goes for occupational therapists, speech therapists, and so forth.

The employers on our job board know the value of a highly skilled therapists. We know the value of quality jobs. We want to help. Check us out and see


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

8 Reasons for Pursuing a Radiation Therapist Career


By Jessica Donahue, R.T. (R) (T) (ARRT)

Radiation therapists play a critical role in cancer treatment by administering radiation to specific areas of a patient’s body. But more than that, they can enjoy an incredibly rewarding career in healthcare.

I’ve been in the radiation therapy community for more than 20 years and have had the privilege of teaching hundreds of students to become radiation therapists. I’m also chair of the Radiation Therapy Degree Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University. In the following, I’d like to share insights on why you should consider this profession.

1. Become a highly valued healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re concerned about the amount of education (and money) it can take to become a healthcare professional, radiation therapy could be an excellent career choice. 

In fact, BusinessInsider.com has radiation therapist on its list of the highest paying jobs not requiring a bachelor’s degree. (Also, U.S. News & World Report puts the profession on two of its Best Jobs lists.)

Depending on the education option you choose — and on your current education level — becoming a radiation therapist can take somewhere between one and four years. 

Here are four possible paths to becoming a radiation therapist:

  • If you’ve already graduated from an associate degree program in the related field of radiologic technology, you can complete a certificate program in radiation therapy in about a year.
  • If you already have a bachelor’s degree in any subject, you may be able to complete a certificate program in radiation therapy in about a year.
  • There are also bachelor degree programs specifically in radiation therapy, which will typically take at least four years to finish.

(See How to Become a Radiation Therapist for more information.)

2. Join a healthcare profession with a promising future

The need for radiation therapists won’t be disappearing anytime soon. For example, cancer risk generally goes up with age. And as the current Baby Boomer generation ages, there will likely be an increased demand for radiation therapists. 

Along with an aging population, this increased demand can also be attributed to improved cancer detection methods and evolving treatments that require a radiation therapist’s expertise.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a positive growth rate (6%) for the radiation therapist profession over the next decade.

3. Enjoy a great work schedule 

The typical work schedule for radiation therapists is an attractive feature of the profession. You usually work in healthcare facilities that operate during daytime hours, Monday through Friday. That also means you usually have weekends, evenings, and holidays off. 

This aspect of the profession makes it an especially good career choice for parents trying to accommodate the needs of their family.

Note that radiation therapists are often needed for full- and part-time positions as well as for traveling therapist positions.

4. Choose a professional path with lots of flexibility

Career flexibility is another appealing feature of this profession. Once you finish a radiation therapy program and take the steps to become registered as a radiation therapist, you’ve completed what the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) calls a “primary eligibility pathway.”

If you’d like, you can then expand your knowledge and credentials through the ARRT’s “postprimary pathways,” which allow you to gain additional certifications in medical imaging procedures like the following:

  • Bone densitometry
  • Computed tomography (CT)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Vascular sonography

And with more qualifications, you can become a more competitive job candidate, have more control over your career direction, and potentially earn more income. 

It’s also worth noting that a background in radiation therapy can also be a valuable foundation for pursuing options such as:

  • Medical device sales and training 
  • Healthcare management roles (which may require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree)
  • Other healthcare professions such as a physician assistant (which would require a professional degree)
  • Directly related professions such as a medical dosimetrist (which would require a professional degree)

6. Make a deeper connection with your patients

Depending on the treatment plan and the nature of the cancer, a patient typically receives radiation treatment five days a week for several weeks in a row. Because of this, radiation therapists are able to become much closer with patients compared to other healthcare professions, and even compared to other members of the cancer treatment team. 

The familiarity you can develop with patients involves more than just delivering treatment. You’re in a position to listen, show compassion, and offer emotional support. You’re often getting to know family members as well.

For many radiation therapists, the daily patient interaction is the single biggest reason why they love their work.

Then there’s the general rhythm of each day. You stay busy and focused with a steady stream of daily patients.

7. Be part of a multidisciplinary cancer treatment team

If you engage with individuals easily and enjoy the atmosphere of being part of a team, then you should definitely explore the field of radiation therapy. 

As a radiation therapist, you work with other team members, prepare patients for their treatments, practice safe protocols by working in pairs, and interact with additional department staff such as nurses, dosimetrists, nutritionists, and radiation oncologists.

Then, of course, there are the patients you have the privilege of helping every day.

8. Work with advanced technology in an environment that fits with your preferences

As a radiation therapist, you’ll be on the front lines of cancer treatment as you work daily with cutting-edge medical technology. And as that technology advances, it also creates opportunities for you to continually learn something new. 

In fact, you’ll have opportunities for life-long learning with continuing education courses through meetings, hands-on training, and directed readings provided through the American Society of Radiologic Technologists

Make the next move and start exploring programs

In a relatively short amount of time, you could be delivering potentially life-saving treatment and enjoying an extremely rewarding career. Could joining the profession of radiation therapy be right for you?  

If you’re intrigued by the information you’ve just read, I recommend that you take the next important step and start exploring radiation therapy programs today! 


Jessica Donahue, B.S. R.T. (R) (T) (ARRT) is an experienced radiation therapist and is also Program Chair for the Radiation Therapy Degree Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University. 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Modern Medical Jobs: Trading Gig Work for Steady Employment?

Medical jobs come in all shapes and sizes. There are private practice doctors and therapists and those employed by hospital groups, clinics, etc. Nurses can choose to work for an employer or freelance as a temporary/per diem provider. At times, the options may seem limitless. But what are the differences between gig work and steady employment?

MarketWatch contributor Kelly James wrote a fascinating piece in late July 2022 about his transition from freelance writing to corporate work. While his experience isn’t identical to healthcare workers who trade self-employment for medical jobs, there are some similarities worth examining.

To set this up, the equivalent of gig work in the medical field is contract work. Medical professionals fill temporary needs on contracts, either arranged on their own or through a temporary/per diem provider. They are self-employed in every sense of the word.

Self-Employment Freedom

In Kelly’s case, he first gave up a lucrative career as a lawyer to become a freelance writer. It was something he had dreamed about for a long time. Going the freelance route afforded him the freedom to be his own boss. He was able to make his own schedule, do something he loved to do, and earn a very good living. It seemed perfect.

Likewise, there is no shortage of doctors, nurses and therapists who have traded in traditional medical employment for the temporary/per diem lifestyle. As prn providers, they are able to take contracts that suit them. They can work when they want to and take time off when necessary. They can even combine work and travel.

The Downsides

In Kelly’s cases, there were downsides. He went back to the corporate world almost out of necessity. He decided that life circumstances required him to have a traditional job with a steady paycheck and medical insurance and was willing to give up being his own boss to get those two things.

Temporary/per diem providers are in a slightly different position. Demand for their services is so high that they rarely need to actively drum up new business. As for health insurance, it is still expensive. But a practitioner who chooses to work through a temporary/per diem agency might get health insurance included as part of the package.

Traditional Employment Stability

Kelly’s return to the corporate world was easy, at first. He enjoyed the routine and He enjoyed getting to know his coworkers and being able to collaborate with them. He certainly enjoyed the stability that comes with working for someone else.

Doctors, nurses, and therapists are no different. More than one locum has returned to traditional employment for the same reasons that drove Kelly back to the corporate world. Self-employment has its perks, but traditional medical jobs offer the kind of stability that doesn’t come with freelancing.

Controlled by Someone Else

On the downside, traditional employment brings with it the burden of being controlled by someone else. Kelly left his first corporate job due to a micromanager who controlled his day so tightly that he felt he couldn’t breathe. Healthcare executives and managers can be equally controlling.

Kelly also had to give up the freedom of making his own schedule and the satisfaction that comes from building a business of his own. Likewise, transitioning from temporary work to a traditional medical job pretty much eliminates work freedom.

Both gig work and traditional employment have their positives and negatives. For most people, traditional employment is the preferred option. But there are some who taste the freedom of self-employment and never look back. That is the way it is in every industry. Medical jobs are no exception.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Great Resignation Isn’t Sparing Healthcare

We have been hearing about the Great Resignation for about a year now. Just in case you’ve been living under a rock, the Great Resignation is a phenomenon that has seen millions of people leave their jobs since the start of the COVID pandemic. Some are leaving to find employment elsewhere within the same industry. Others are retiring early. Still others are looking for a complete change, looking for work in an entirely different field or starting a new business.

Unfortunately for healthcare, the Great Resignation isn’t sparing it. Just look at nurse practitioner jobs. They are as plentiful now as they have ever been. The same goes for nursing jobs, physician jobs, therapist jobs, and on and on. It is not clear where all the disaffected workers are going, but it is clear that healthcare facilities are now having to work harder than they ever have in the past to fill open positions.

Looking for Something New

It is not surprising that job boards would have a lot more open doctor, nurse, and nurse practitioner jobs since the start of the pandemic. Healthcare delivery was obviously at the forefront of the pandemic. It still is. A lot of healthcare professionals just had their fill in the troubled year that was 2020. Many have decided it is time for a change.

Out in Idaho, the Idaho Press recently published an article about a group of healthcare professionals who had gotten together to discuss life after healthcare. Some of them were in the position of transitioning to new careers while others had already made the switch. The group represented everyone from nurse practitioners to therapists.

It is interesting that these professionals wanted to share their stories, not to encourage other healthcare workers to abandoned ship, but to let them know that other things were out there should they decide to try something new. That’s really what all of this is about. Whether it is healthcare or some other industry, the Great Resignation is about switching gears.

Those Who Stay Behind

Virtually every industry is reeling from the fallout of the Great Resignation. Those who stay behind have their own choices to make. Do they stay, or do they go? In healthcare, employers are doing everything they can to make sure their people stay. They have every reason to do so.

It goes without saying that healthcare workers are in the driver’s seat right now. They have a lot of leverage to ask for changes. Healthcare facilities have little choice but to comply with every reasonable request. Otherwise, they stand to continue losing workers to the Great Resignation.

From nurse practitioner jobs to allied health jobs, things in healthcare are changing rapidly. That is one of the things the group in Idaho mentioned. Many of the healthcare professionals who have decided to move on say that the modern work environment is nothing like what they knew when they first got started. Again, this is understandable. Nothing remains unchanged forever.

The Opportunities Are There

Even as the Great Resignation continues, opportunities for employment abound. If you are looking for nurse practitioner jobs, you will find plenty here on our jobs board. The same goes for therapist jobs, physician jobs, etc. Take the time to look around and maybe post your resume. There are employers out there very much interested in speaking with you.

In the meantime, the healthcare sector will have to continue changing in order to adapt to the modern workforce. The old ways of doing things are not going to work any longer. The faster healthcare adapts, the faster it will right the employment ship and start moving forward again.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Is a Career in Allied Health Right for You?

Healthcare is one of those industries for which there will always be available jobs. Healthcare is a basic human need, so the demand for healthcare workers will always exist. But do not assume that the best careers in the healthcare sector are limited to doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. There is an entire allied health category to consider.

Positions in allied health are still healthcare jobs. Many of them involve direct patient interaction. Others do not. Either way, careers in allied healthcare are every bit as important to patient health and well-being as clinical careers. To be clear, clinical careers are more or less the ‘big four’:

  • Medical doctor
  • Nurse (including advanced practice nurses)
  • Pharmacist
  • Dentist

Pretty much all other healthcare jobs fall under the allied health category. As it turns out, a majority of all healthcare jobs are in the allied category. Allied healthcare workers run the gamut from radiologists to technicians and dental hygienists.

3 Categories of Allied Health

There are no hard and fast rules for dividing up allied healthcare jobs into highly specific categories. However, there are three general categories that most healthcare facilities and hiring managers recognize:

  • Primary Care – Allied healthcare jobs in primary care are those related to providing day-to-day care in the GP’s office, community medical clinic, etc.
  • Diagnostic and Lab – Healthcare jobs in the diagnostic and lab category include things like lab technicians and phlebotomy technicians.
  • Admin, Rehab, and Promotion – This is the broadest category and includes administrative jobs, careers in marketing, and rehabilitative specialties.

We list literally thousands of allied healthcare jobs on the Health Jobs Nationwide jobs board. Take a few minutes to browse through them and you will see all three categories represented quite well. Needless to say, the healthcare sector has plenty of room for new allied health workers.

Choosing the Right Career

With so many possibilities in allied healthcare, choosing the right career may be a bit challenging. Ask yourself whether you are looking for a patient-facing career. That is the first dividing line. If you would prefer to not work directly with patients in a delivery setting, you can then take certain career choices off your list.

Next, what are your thoughts on education? Different allied health jobs require different levels of commitment in both time and financial resources. Some allied health jobs for example can be had with just a certification that can be obtained after taking a comparatively short training course. Other careers require many years of college education along with state licensing.

Finally, ask yourself where you actually want to work. Although allied healthcare jobs are available all across the country, some markets are stronger than others for specific types of jobs. The Health Jobs Nationwide jobs board can help to some degree in this respect. You can browse the board to see what types of jobs are available where you want to live.

Your Job Search Starts Here

Whether you are new to allied health or a seasoned pro, your search for a new job starts right here. Health Jobs Nationwide offers thousands of posts from employers looking to hire allied health workers. You can sort by job type, geographic location, and much more.

Is allied health right for you? Only you can decide that. But if it is, be confident in the fact that there are plenty of allied healthcare jobs available in the U.S. We can help you find the one you are looking for. If you are ready to get started, so are we. Your career in allied health is waiting.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

A Profession with a Bright Future: 5 Advantages to Being a Clinical Massage Therapist

Clinical massage therapists are becoming increasingly important in healthcare. Learn why this profession could be a great career option.

The demand for massage therapists is high and a big part of that has to do with the profession’s growing role in healthcare. Clinical massage therapists use massage techniques to help heal injuries, alleviate pain, and improve muscle function.

I’ve experienced the exciting transformation of the massage therapy profession firsthand, both as a practicing massage therapist and as a massage therapy instructor and program director.

Below, I’ll describe five advantages to being a clinical massage therapist.

1. Become a healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re interested in a healthcare career but are concerned about the time and expense it can take, massage therapy could be a great option for you.

Depending on the program you choose, it’s possible for you to obtain a certificate in therapeutic massage in a year or so. This can prepare you to work in healthcare settings such as hospitals, chiropractic offices, and integrative healthcare clinics, as well as your own massage therapy practice.

And with approximately another three to eight months of education, you can obtain an associate degree. This can open up additional opportunities for further education and professional advancement. (For more info, check out how to become a massage therapist.)

2. Choose a profession with a bright future

Although there are no guarantees when it comes to obtaining employment, you should know the current — and expected — demand for massage therapists is extremely high.

In fact, in my 18 years of experience, I can’t recall a more promising time to enter the massage therapy job market.

A great indicator of this is the Bureau of Labor Statistics job outlook from 2020 to 2030, which projects a 32% job growth rate. To help put that in perspective, that’s nearly four times the average growth rate for all jobs.

3. Enjoy a low-stress career helping improve people’s health

Clinical massage therapists do more than help people feel more relaxed. They can play a pivotal role in relieving certain types of pain, helping people rehabilitate from injuries and surgeries, and optimizing muscle functioning.

Having a career helping improve people’s health in ways like these can be incredibly rewarding.
Also, keep in mind that some healthcare settings can be hectic and stressful. But the good news here is that clinical massage therapists typically work in low-stress settings.

They also can enjoy the satisfaction of establishing a deeper connection with patients. Rather than move patients quickly through appointments, clinical massage therapists provide direct care through touch, sometimes for an hour or more.

4. Have the freedom to create your own career path

Compared to many other healthcare professions, clinical massage therapists have more freedom to create their own career path.

For example, opening your own massage therapy practice is a viable — and popular — option for massage therapists, which makes it easier to shape your own schedule.

But if having your own massage practice isn’t for you, that’s not a problem. Clinical massage therapists can find employment in a wide range of settings. Here are some examples:

Integrative care clinics
Chiropractic offices
Community clinics
Primary care clinics
Sports and rehabilitation clinics
Public and private hospitals
VA medical centers
Fitness centers
Sports team facilities

Clinical massage therapists can also specialize in working with specific types of patients. Veterans, children, seniors, athletes, expectant mothers, cancer patients, hospice patients — these are just some of the many possibilities.

5. Be on the front lines of exciting changes in healthcare

As a clinical massage therapist, you can become part of an exciting new era in healthcare. I’m talking specifically about integrative healthcare, a patient-centered, team-based approach involving practitioners from various fields working together to help patients.

Increasingly, clinical massage therapists are part of a healthcare team — in some cases working alongside — healthcare professionals like chiropractors, acupuncturists, physical therapists, medical doctors, nurses, and more.

In the process, clinical massage therapists are also helping to meet the growing demand for drug-free, noninvasive alternatives to pain medications such as opioids.

Take the next step and start exploring programs

You’ve just gotten a glimpse of a growing healthcare profession in high demand, one where you can become a professional in a shorter amount of time, shape your own career more easily, and enjoy a low-stress environment helping others become healthier.

Could becoming a clinical massage therapist be right for you? To learn more, start researching massage therapy programs today.


Spring Saldana is board-certified in therapeutic massage and bodywork, the highest credential within the massage and bodywork profession. She is also the Program Chair of the Massage Therapy Programs at Northwestern Health Sciences University.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where PT, OT, SLP, & RT Salaries Are Highest & Lowest

Therapy roles are generally known to come with decent pay, but where are PTs, OTs, SLPs, and RTs earning the most and the least? Find out here.

Therapy roles are generally known to come with a decent wage, often ranking on lists of “Best Paying Jobs” both within and outside of healthcare.

Considering physical, occupational, speech, and respiratory therapists are highly-skilled, in-demand healthcare workers, this should not be surprising. However, where they are paid the highest and the lowest salaries may surprise you.

Below are the 10 states where PTs, OTs, SLPs, and RTs make the most and the least, on average, according to 2020 salary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Physical Therapists – Highest Paying States

  1. Nevada – $108,580
  2. California – $104,500
  3. Alaska – $101,190
  4. New Jersey – $100,740
  5. Connecticut – $100,580
  6. New Mexico – $98,580
  7. Delaware – $97,260
  8. Illinois – $97,060
  9. District of Columbia – $96,090
  10. Virginia – $94,370

Physical Therapists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $78,850
  2. Vermont – $81,580
  3. Idaho – $82,470
  4. Maine – $83,380
  5. Iowa – $83,640
  6. Arkansas – $84,410
  7. Montana – $84,600
  8. South Carolina – $84,640
  9. Missouri – $84,660
  10. North Dakota – $84,880

Occupational Therapists – Highest Paying States

  1. Nevada – $111,270
  2. California – $101,080
  3. Arizona – $99,950
  4. New Jersey – $98,750
  5. District of Columbia – $96,330
  6. Virginia – $95,170
  7. Alaska – $93,980
  8. Rhode Island – $93,330
  9. Connecticut – $92,000
  10. Colorado – $91,650

Occupational Therapists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Maine – $72,500
  2. North Dakota – $73,280
  3. South Dakota – $74,580
  4. Vermont – $75,330
  5. Montana – $76,200
  6. Wisconsin – $76,850
  7. Michigan – $77,600
  8. Minnesota – $77,790
  9. Missouri – $78,660
  10. South Carolina – $79,840

Speech-Language Pathologists – Highest Paying States

  1. District of Columbia – $101,920
  2. Connecticut – $100,590
  3. New Jersey – $100,330
  4. New York – $98,010
  5. California – $95,570
  6. Virginia – $92,520
  7. Colorado – $91,200
  8. Oregon – $87,850
  9. Rhode Island – $87,270
  10. Alaska – $87,250

Speech-Language Pathologists – Lowest Paying States

  1. South Dakota – $59,270
  2. Alabama – $66,400
  3. West Virginia – $67,010
  4. Mississippi – $67,250
  5. North Dakota – $67,790
  6. Maine – $69,250
  7. South Carolina – $71,340
  8. Nebraska – $71,940
  9. Montana – $72,220
  10. Idaho – $72,390

Respiratory Therapists – Highest Paying States

  1. California – $87,190
  2. District of Columbia – $82,940
  3. New York – $79,840
  4. Hawaii – $77,930
  5. Nevada – $77,380
  6. Massachusetts – $76,270
  7. Washington – $75,380
  8. New Jersey – $74,710
  9. Alaska – $74,390
  10. Oregon – $72,340

Respiratory Therapists – Lowest Paying States

  1. Mississippi – $51,480
  2. Kentucky – $51,800
  3. Alabama – $51,820
  4. West Virginia – $52,400
  5. South Dakota – $53,610
  6. Tennessee – $54,310
  7. Louisiana – $55,720
  8. Iowa – $56,260
  9. Arkansas – $56,400
  10. Georgia – $56,750

Ready to start your search for a higher paying therapy job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapy’s Most In-Demand Roles

Despite being majorly impacted by the pandemic, healthcare employment is rebounding at a steady clip. What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now, and where?

As the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in April of 2020, despite being, arguably, the most needed and relevant industry, healthcare accounted for approximately 6.8% of the more than 20 million jobs lost in the U.S. during that time.

Fast forward to present day, and healthcare is rebounding at a steady clip. Despite the current overall unemployment rate being 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare has dropped to only 3.1%. Healthcare has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when it added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

1. Speech-Language Pathologist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 30%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida
View All SLP Jobs →

2. Physical Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 22.2%
Most Needed In: California, Florida, Texas, Georgia, and New York
View All PT Jobs →

3. Occupational Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 18.4%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, Florida, and New York
View All OT Jobs →

4. Respiratory Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 16.1%
Most Needed In: Ohio, Texas, Florida, Michigan, and Georgia
View All RT Jobs →

5. Physical Therapist Assistant

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 7.3%
Most Needed In: California, New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Connecticut
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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

These Are the Best Healthcare Jobs in America

Healthcare professionals have received a lot of praise over the last year, often being lauded as heroes. But which healthcare jobs ranked as the best?

Those who work in healthcare have always known how essential their jobs are. The rest of the world learned this in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold and forever changed the way the healthcare profession will be viewed by the general public. Physicians and Registered Nurses, in particular, were heaped with praise, becoming the heroes of our nation and the world.

But which healthcare jobs are best? Not the most celebrated or well-recognized, but the best—best for salary, work-life balance, stress level, the job market, and future growth. U.S. News & World Report released their annual rankings based on these very metrics. The 20 best healthcare jobs according to their findings are listed below.

1. Physician Assistant

Overall Score: 8.3 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.4/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $112,260
Other Rankings: #1 in 100 Best Jobs, #1 in Best STEM Jobs
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2. Nurse Practitioner

Overall Score: 8.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 10/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $109,820
Other Rankings: #3 in 100 Best Jobs, #3 in Best STEM Jobs
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3. Physician

Overall Score: 7.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $206,500
Other Rankings: #5 in 100 Best Jobs, #8 in Best Paying Jobs
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4. Speech-Language Pathologist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $79,120
Other Rankings: #7 in 100 Best Jobs
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5. Dentist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 9.9/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $155,600
Other Rankings: #7 in Best STEM Jobs, #9 in 100 Best Jobs, #11 in Best Paying Jobs
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6. Veterinarian

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $95,460
Other Rankings: #10 in 100 Best Jobs
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7. Orthodontist

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 8/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #5 in Best Paying Jobs, #8 in Best STEM Jobs, #11 in 100 Best Jobs
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8. Anesthesiologist

Overall Score: 7.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #1 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in 100 Best Jobs
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9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #3 in Best Paying Jobs, #18 in 100 Best Jobs
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10. Occupational Therapist

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $84,950
Other Rankings: #19 in 100 Best Jobs
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11. Physical Therapist

Overall Score: 6.9 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.5/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $89,440
Other Rankings: #21 in 100 Best Jobs
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12. Psychiatrist

Overall Score: 6.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 6/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #7 in Best Paying Jobs, #27 in 100 Best Jobs
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13. Prosthodontist

Overall Score: 6.7 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #6 in Best Paying Jobs, #35 in 100 Best Jobs
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14. Registered Nurse

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.8/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $73,300
Other Rankings: #37 in 100 Best Jobs
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15. Nurse Anesthetist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $174,790
Other Rankings: #10 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in Best STEM Jobs, #39 in 100 Best Jobs
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16. Obstetrician and Gynecologist — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #4 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
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16. Surgeon — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #2 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
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18. Chiropractor

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.6/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $70,340
Other Rankings: #44 in 100 Best Jobs
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19. Podiatrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.9/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $126,240
Other Rankings: #18 in Best Paying Jobs, #46 in 100 Best Jobs
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20. Optometrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.5/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $115,250
Other Rankings: #22 in Best Paying Jobs, #48 in 100 Best Jobs
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How do you feel about the rankings? Does your job seem like it’s the “best”? The worst? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.