The Simple Reason Nurses Should Put Themselves Before Their Patients

There is nothing to give if you start out on empty.

from The Huffington Post

I’m a critical care nurse who works the night shift, so sleep and I have had a precarious relationship in the past. There’d be yelling; there’d be tossing and turning; there’d be wistful glances at the alarm clock to count down how many hours I wouldn’t get restful shut eye that night. There’d be even more tossing and turning, followed by a pleading apology to the sleep gods for whatever misdeed I’d done to deserve such a sleepless existence. Thankfully, during my five years on the job, I’ve learned a thing or two about trying to snag a good night’s sleep in a high-stress, chronically sleep-deprived profession.

Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

An Oncology Nurse’s Perspective on the Health Insurance Situation

One oncology infusion nurse offers her thoughts on the ACA.

from American Journal of Nursing

I was an oncology infusion nurse in a hospital-based ambulatory center for a number of years, many of them before the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law in 2010. Besides administering chemotherapy and blood products, I infused medications to patients with sickle cell anemia as well as chronic autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and Crohn’s disease. The common denominator among these diseases is the high cost of the medications used to treat them, at the time ranging from $3,000 to $10,000 per treatment. I know, because patients told me, their nurse.

Read More →

Choosing Your Political Battles

One of the most challenging lessons new leaders learn is that not every battle is worth fighting.

from American Nursing Today

Mary*, a new manager in the operating room, prides herself on being a strong advocate for her staff, quickly acting on every issue with which she’s presented. So she’s a little surprised when her leader-mentor Susan tells her that she’s developing a reputation for being overly aggressive. Susan, who explains to Mary that she’s perceived in conflict situations as trying to win at all costs, suggests that this reputation could ultimately derail her career. She recommends that Mary learn to pick and choose her political battles more carefully.

Read More →

New Feature: Love Letters to Nursing

Tell us why you love being a nurse and you could be featured in our new series, Love Letters to Nursing.

We here at HealthJobsNationwide do our best to deliver interesting news and great career opportunities to you on a regular basis. But how personal is that? How relevant to your life? We know, you’re not always looking for a new job. And maybe not every article we send is of interest to you.

So, we want to get to know you. We want to connect with you. We want to know why you pull on those scrubs day after day, even when your feet are killing you and your patients are crabby.

And so we’re asking you: What do you love about your job?

Go ahead and brag a little. We’d love to hear it and maybe feature you in our upcoming series, Love Letters to Nursing, so you can be the envy of nurses the world over—or, even better, their inspiration.

Name:*
E-mail:*
Title:*
Specialty:*
Why Do You Love Being a Nurse?*
Confirm You're Human:

Fuel Career Satisfaction with Evidence-Based Practice

Thoughts on how to rectify chronic burnout and fatigue for nurses.

from Nurse.com

Recently, I visited my postop wife at the hospital, looking like every other family member. When I told a nurse, Linda, that I was a nurse as well, she said to me, “I’m sorry.” What I believe she meant was that she was sorry I was trapped in a lackluster, sad profession, like she was, and Linda was commiserating. This wasn’t the first time I heard this reply from a nurse.

As a nurse who is enthused about nursing, I angrily said, “Why would you say that to me?”

She told me she had been a nurse for 30 years, doing the same job in the same old way, and she was just tired and probably burnt out.

Read More →

How Actively Caring and Exercising Your Own Career Planning Benefits Everyone

With today’s frantic pace of life and the speed at which we all must make decisions about where and how to invest our time and energy, it is not surprising but yet ironic that health care professionals often fail to properly nurture their own careers.

from Minority Nurse

Health care professionals and organizations all recognize the importance of paying attention to our health. Every day we witness the negative consequences of neglecting to cultivate and maintain healthy routines. Sickness loves to seek out the overburdened mind and body. With today’s frantic pace of life and the speed at which we all must make decisions about where and how to invest our time and energy, it is not surprising but yet ironic that health care professionals often fail to properly nurture their own careers.

Read More →