12 Foot Care Tricks for Nurses with Tired Feet

93% of nurses suffer from swollen and painful feet after their shift. Here are some ways to lessen that pain.

from Massage Boss

According to a survey conducted by the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists, nearly all nurses (93%) suffer from swollen and painful feet after their shift. If left untreated, foot pain can negatively impact your job satisfaction, efficiency, and long-term health. Because of this, it’s essential for every nurse to do their best to take care of their feet. Learn how to put your best foot forward with these helpful foot care tips.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Sleep Tips for the Tired Nurse

It’s Sleep Awareness Week, and if you’re a nurse, you’re probably well aware of how tired you are. Here’s some tips on how to get a better night’s sleep.

by Kathleen Caulfield, RN

Sleep, sleep, sleep—for many of us it’s hard to get there and even harder to stay there. It especially seems a problem for stressed out nurses, with their chaotic routines and many demands. But the insomnia can be cured with a few tweaks, and given that it’s Sleep Awareness Week, I wanted to share some tips for how busy nurses can get a better night’s rest:

  • No use of electronic devices 1-2 hours before bed. Shut off TVs, cell phones – no texting. Or, better yet, remove them from the bedroom entirely.
  • Plan your day the night before. Llay out your clothes, jot down work activities or tasks for the next day. This can allay some anxiety.
  • Take a warm bath with lavender Epsom salts.
  • Stop caffeine early in the day and limit alcohol 3 hours before bed.
  • Exercise is key to sleep; do it early in the day for a restful night.
  • Respect the sleep process. Use nightclothes that are clean and comfortable.
  • Prep your bedroom. Keep it clutter-free, and get comfortable pillows that support your neck, linens that are soft to the touch.
  • Use room darkening drapes.
  • Keep the bedroom cool: 68 degrees is a good setting.
  • Have a light dinner and if hungry prior to bed, eat foods high in tryptophan, such as nut butters, bananas, yogurt, tuna, dates.
  • Warm milk is excellent, but not palatable for some. Try it with a teaspoon of real vanilla and a package of natural sweetener to improve taste.
  • Passion, valerian, or chamomile tea one hour before bedtime is also known to be effective for promoting relaxation.
  • Incorporate yoga into your nightly routine, including child’s pose, legs up against the wall, or corpse pose to assist with relaxation.
  • Journal and reread your entry to give closure to the day.
  • Use progressive relaxation techniques.
  • Lavender in any form – candles, spray for pillowcases or sheets, or in a diffuser.
  • Keep a sleep diary.

By evaluating these components with a sleep diary, often the culprit causing sleep problems and deprivation will be caught, and insomnia will no longer reign.


Kathleen Caulfield is a Registered Nurse who has worked in all facets of nursing, with her most recent gig as a psych nurse in New York City. Currently residing in Florida while seeking employment, she is sharing her passion for writing with us at HealthJobsNationwide.com.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Using Social Media in Nursing

Nurses are tapping the vein of social media for networking, gathering and sharing knowledge, and more.

from AJC

Amid the digital blast of the information age, the use of social media continues to be a preferred form of communication and information for many, both professionally and personally. Nurses are no exception, often tapping the vein of social media from networking to gathering and sharing knowledge.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

5 Exercises for Nurses to Improve Strength and Flexibility

A great regimen of exercises that nurses can do every day to increase strength, flexibility, and physical fitness.

from Scrubs Magazine

What’s a nurse to do when there’s no time to go to the gym? There’s an answer! Even though going to the gym and doing some cardio on the treadmill or elliptical is a good workout, it’s not the only way that you can keep fit.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Role of the Nurse in Preventing Opioid Abuse

Nurses can play an important role in reducing opioid deaths through their assessments and monitoring of patients.

from Minority Nurse

Overdose deaths related to prescription opioids have quadrupled since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which has made it a topic of dinner conversation as well as a top priority in health care. Nurses can play an important role in reducing these deaths, as well as addiction problems, through their assessments and monitoring of patients. But it’s also important for nurses to be well aware of steps they can take to help protect themselves from possible legal action stemming from opioids.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Depression Among Nurses: It’s Real

Nurses are twice at risk for depression than the general population.

from NurseBuff

Every day, nurses experience a great deal of stress. You’re thinking of problems at work, people relying on you for their care, and tons of responsibilities piling up at home. With so many things to do and think about, it’s tempting to just quit and leave—but you can’t. And that’s where things start to get worse.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

What Happens to Patient Care When There Are Not Enough Nurses?

The U.S. does not have enough RNs. What does that mean for the nation’s sick and elderly?

from Kellogg Insight

What are the repercussions of lower nurse staffing for patients? Do sick people get worse care, or possibly die more often, when there are not enough nurses on staff at a hospital or nursing home? In new research, Friedrich, an assistant professor of strategy, finds that a sharp reduction in the number of nurses at a facility can have detrimental effects on patients, particularly those residing in nursing homes. And even in hospitals, where staffing systems blunted much of the impact of a nursing shortage, patient care still suffered.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Immigrant Nurses: Filling the Next U.S. Shortage

As the health care workforce ages, foreign nurses will step up once again.

from U.S. News & World Report

In many U.S. hospitals, nurses from other countries help keep emergency rooms and inpatient units running. From the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s to currently understaffed hospitals, foreign nurses continue to ease shortages in parts of the nation. As the U.S. braces for a wave of aging patients, and an exodus of retiring nurses, foreign nurses are expected to be needed as much as ever.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

14 Things Veteran Nurses Should Tell New Grads

Small pearls of wisdom to encourage future generations of nurses.

from NurseBuff

According to several different studies conducted between 2009 and 2016, new nurses are leaving the profession at a rate of 20-33% within the first year of employment. Note that. They are leaving the profession, not just a particular employer. If seasoned nurses would teach new grads how to self-prepare mentally, professionally and physically before and throughout each shift, I truly believe we can slow this mass exodus.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Substance Abuse in Nursing: What Are the Signs and What to Do About It?

Do you suspect that a co-worker is abusing drugs or alcohol and impaired while at work? What are the signs? What should you do about it?

from NurseLabs

The American Nurses Association suggests that up to 10% of nurses may have a substance abuse problem, and some studies have suggested that this might be as high as 1 in 5. Many of these nurses are addicted to prescription drugs and part of what the CDC describes as the opioid addiction epidemic. Numerous addicted nurses have not been long-term abusers but get caught in the trap of tolerance and dependence after having the drugs prescribed or having self-medicated after emotional trauma.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.