These Are the Best Healthcare Jobs in America

Healthcare professionals have received a lot of praise over the last year, often being lauded as heroes. But which healthcare jobs ranked as the best?

Those who work in healthcare have always known how essential their jobs are. The rest of the world learned this in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold and forever changed the way the healthcare profession will be viewed by the general public. Physicians and Registered Nurses, in particular, were heaped with praise, becoming the heroes of our nation and the world.

But which healthcare jobs are best? Not the most celebrated or well-recognized, but the best—best for salary, work-life balance, stress level, the job market, and future growth. U.S. News & World Report released their annual rankings based on these very metrics. The 20 best healthcare jobs according to their findings are listed below.

1. Physician Assistant

Overall Score: 8.3 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.4/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $112,260
Other Rankings: #1 in 100 Best Jobs, #1 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Physician Assistant Jobs →

2. Nurse Practitioner

Overall Score: 8.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 10/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $109,820
Other Rankings: #3 in 100 Best Jobs, #3 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Nurse Practitioner Jobs →

3. Physician

Overall Score: 7.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $206,500
Other Rankings: #5 in 100 Best Jobs, #8 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Physician Jobs →

4. Speech-Language Pathologist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $79,120
Other Rankings: #7 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Speech-Language Pathologist Jobs →

5. Dentist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 9.9/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $155,600
Other Rankings: #7 in Best STEM Jobs, #9 in 100 Best Jobs, #11 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Dentist Jobs →

6. Veterinarian

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $95,460
Other Rankings: #10 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Veterinarian Jobs →

7. Orthodontist

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 8/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #5 in Best Paying Jobs, #8 in Best STEM Jobs, #11 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Orthodontist Jobs →

8. Anesthesiologist

Overall Score: 7.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #1 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Anesthesiologist Jobs →

9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #3 in Best Paying Jobs, #18 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Jobs →

10. Occupational Therapist

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $84,950
Other Rankings: #19 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Occupational Therapist Jobs →

11. Physical Therapist

Overall Score: 6.9 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.5/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $89,440
Other Rankings: #21 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Physical Therapist Jobs →

12. Psychiatrist

Overall Score: 6.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 6/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #7 in Best Paying Jobs, #27 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Psychiatrist Jobs →

13. Prosthodontist

Overall Score: 6.7 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #6 in Best Paying Jobs, #35 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Prosthodontist Jobs →

14. Registered Nurse

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.8/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $73,300
Other Rankings: #37 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Registered Nurse Jobs →

15. Nurse Anesthetist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $174,790
Other Rankings: #10 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in Best STEM Jobs, #39 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Nurse Anesthetist Jobs →

16. Obstetrician and Gynecologist — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #4 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Obstetrician and Gynecologist Jobs →

16. Surgeon — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #2 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Surgeon Jobs →

18. Chiropractor

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.6/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $70,340
Other Rankings: #44 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Chiropractor Jobs →

19. Podiatrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.9/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $126,240
Other Rankings: #18 in Best Paying Jobs, #46 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Podiatrist Jobs →

20. Optometrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.5/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $115,250
Other Rankings: #22 in Best Paying Jobs, #48 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Optometrist Jobs →

How do you feel about the rankings? Does your job seem like it’s the “best”? The worst? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Get Your Résumé Ready for the New Year

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job—a resolution that landed on a list of the most popular resolutions for 2021—now is the time to get your résumé in prime shape. While hiring was obviously impacted in many ways over the course of 2020, traditionally, hiring ramps big time once the calendar rolls over into January. If you are seeking a change for the year ahead, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

New Year, New Look

The New Year, for many, is often time for a bold change, and your résumé should be no exception. Start out by updating the look and feel of your résumé. Your goal should be to have a résumé that is easy to follow and one that instantly reflects who you are and what you can do. Some quick tips for giving your résumé a makeover include:

  • Start with an easy-to-follow, modern template that has clearly defined sections of information. Some great examples of résumés like these can be found here, here, and here.
  • Identify and use a tagline for yourself. You aren’t just a nurse or a doctor. “NICU RN-BSN, BLS and ACLS Certified” or “Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician” tucked beneath your name at the top of your résumé affords the reader insight into your qualifications before they even really begin to dig into your document.
  • Update your contact information to current standards. Listing your mailing address is less important these days than linking to your online social profiles. Include, at a minimum, a URL for your LinkedIn account, and any other professionally acceptable social accounts you may hold. Also, be sure to include your email address, but only if it’s one that can be taken seriously, and not something like GlitterSparkleButterfly@whatever.com.
  • Throw out the old objective section in favor of a short, professional summary, and stock it with your most impressive qualifications and accomplishments, which you should then expand upon in your experience and education sections.

Take Stock of 2020

Now that your résumé has a new look for the new year, the content will need updating, as well. With 2020 firmly in the rearview, take time to reflect on all that happened over the course of the year. What did you accomplish? What new skills did you learn? Did you gain any new certifications or degrees? Did you receive any special recognition? Did you take on any new responsibilities?

Also, and probably most importantly, take the time to reflect on what you truly want out of 2021 and beyond. If 2020 taught us anything, it is that time is precious. You should spend your time doing what you love, and your résumé should position you to find a job that fits into that—not just a job that you fit into.

Look back on where the previous year has taken you, and then update the appropriate sections of your résumé to reflect any worthwhile highlights. You will also want to trim the fat, so to speak, from previous years, if there is anything listed that is no longer relevant or has become less impressive over time.

Lastly, take note of keywords that are frequently used in the job postings you have been browsing and make sure you include as many of them as possible in the text of your résumé. Doing so will increase your odds of being labeled as a match for the jobs to which you plan to apply.

Get Online

If you are like the bulk of the population, you will likely be applying to jobs online in 2021, be it on our site or elsewhere, making the online version of your résumé just as important as the paper copy you will bring with you when you go in to interview for said jobs. Make sure you upload your updated résumé to our site and any others you may be using to browse for jobs, and also take the time to revamp your LinkedIn profile to match your reworked résumé, and update any other social accounts you plan to disclose to potential employers (or lock down the ones you don’t plan to share via privacy preferences).

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our 5 Most Popular Articles of 2020

In case you missed any of these worthwhile reads the first time around, we’ve compiled a list of our most popular articles of 2020. Read them here.

With the arrival of 2021, we thought it might be a good time to take a look back at our most popular articles from the year that was 2020. Given they all garnered a lot of traffic over the year, there is a chance you might have seen some of these articles before. However, in case you missed any of these very worthwhile posts the first time around, we have put together the list below.

Please note that we are aware these are not all uplifting reads, but a lot of them are certainly important ones, highlighting the long and trying year 2020 was for many. To shy away from how hard this past year was for you, your loved ones, your patients, and the world as a whole would be doing you a disservice. We thank you immensely for your dedication to your profession and to the lives of your patients this year, and we are fervently wishing you much health, happiness, and healing in 2021.

Without further ado, here are our top five most popular articles from 2020.

1. Freebies, Discounts, & Perks for Healthcare’s Heroes


To recognize the heroic efforts of frontline medical staff, companies are offering promotions as a way of giving back. Here’s a giant list of them.
Read More →

2. The Top 10 Pandemic-Proof Healthcare Jobs


Healthcare is often touted as a recession-proof industry. But is it pandemic-proof? Given the number of available jobs, it seems so. See the most in-demand position types here.
Read More →

3. 10 Healthcare Roles Top Riskiest List


In what may come as a surprise to very few, the top ten riskiest jobs in terms of possible COVID-19 exposure are patient-facing roles in healthcare.
Read More →

4. How to Cope When You Hate Your Job


Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.
Read More →

5. Mental Health of Healthcare Workers Has Tanked Amid Pandemic


The COVID-19 pandemic is clearly taking a toll on the mental health of our nation’s healthcare workers, according to the findings of our recent survey.
Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

15 Holiday Wish List Must-Haves for Nurses

No matter what you will be celebrating this holiday season, here are 15 things nurses should add to their holiday wish lists.

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Yule, Solstice, or just the end of 2020—no matter what you will be celebrating this holiday season, here are 15 things nurses should add to their holiday wish lists. Or snag for themselves, because everyone deserves a treat every now and then—especially this year. From ultra-practical PPE and antimicrobial scrubs to a fancy coffee maker to fuel even the most exhausted nurse, there is something for everyone on this list.

1. The Gift of Mental Wellness via a TalkSpace Gift Card, $79.00+

2. This Light Blocking Sleep Mask to Help You Recharge, Day or Night, $12.99

3. A UV Light Phone Sanitizer, Because Germs, $119.95

4. Some PPE (Because Can You Really Have Enough PPE?), $79.00

5. This Fancy Nurse Fuel Maker, $199.99

6. And an Insulated Cup to Keep Your Nurse Fuel Piping Hot, $34.99

7. Some Extra Cozy Antimicrobial Scrub Pants

Women’s, $32.98+

Men’s, $37.98+

8. A Pair of Seriously Supportive Shoes, $128.62+

9. A Trusty Stethoscope, $98.99+

10. This Insanely Useful Thing That Makes Cooking a Breeze, Even after Your Longest Shift, $59.98+

11. Some Stress Relief In A Jar, $15.18

12. A Neck/Back/Shoulder/Everywhere Else That Hurts Deep Tissue Massager, $39.99

13. TLC for Your Hands after Washing Them Vigorously All Year Long, $14.99

14. An Efficient (But Effective) Gratitude Journal, $22.90

15. This Hilariously Honest & Crazy Comfy T-shirt, $18.99+

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.

3 States with the Most Demand for Nurses

Healthcare added back more than a quarter million jobs over the past three months. Here are the top three states where demand for nurses is the greatest.

The nursing workforce, like virtually every other industry, was greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, seeing staggering job losses as the virus—and the economic fallout associated with it—swept the nation. However, nurses are essential in a way that most other professions are not at the moment, and hiring remains steady, with the healthcare industry adding back more than 250,000 jobs during July, August, and September.

Where is the demand for nurses the greatest, though? We analyzed data from our jobs website to determine what states currently have the highest inventory of openings. Here are the top three states where nurses are needed most.

1. California

Average Annual Registered Nurse Salary in California: $113,240

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Registered Nurse Jobs in California →

2. Texas

Average Annual Registered Nurse Salary in Texas: $74,540

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Registered Nurse Jobs in Texas →

3. Virginia

Average Annual Registered Nurse Salary in Virginia: $71,870

Noteworthy Openings in Virginia:

Click Here to Search Registered Nurse Jobs in Virginia →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Return to School Shines Spotlight on Oft-Forgotten Nurses

Given the ongoing COVID crisis, school nurses are more important than ever before, as they look after the health and well-being of students and staff alike.

Nurses are synonymous with hospitals, public health clinics, and physicians’ offices. We expect to see nurses dressed in scrubs whenever we go in for medical tests. But there is one group of nurses that is often forgotten: school nurses. They are forgotten no more now that the nation is returning to school in the midst of the ongoing coronavirus crisis.

School nurses are more important than ever before. That is not to say they were unimportant prior to coronavirus, but rather to say that their responsibilities are so much greater as they look after the health and well-being of students and staff alike.

Meeting Students at the Door

Today’s school nurses work with other staff members to meet students as they arrive for school. Students are temperature check and asked about symptoms. These daily meetings are commonplace in school districts across the country. But once classes start, the nurse’s job isn’t done. Indeed, it has just begun.

School nursing jobs exist to provide adequate medical care in the event a student falls ill or is injured on campus. So nurses return to their offices following coronavirus screening only to be greeted by the rest of their daily work.

Students enter the nurse’s office throughout the day to receive their prescription medications. Others come in complaining of headaches, stomach aches, and a variety of other problems. It is the school nurse’s job to comfort and diagnose simultaneously. When necessary, it is her job to contact parents and request a sick child be picked up.

Communicating About Coronavirus

Communicating with parents is a normal part of the school nurse’s job, especially when kids are sick. However, coronavirus has taken that aspect of the nurse’s job to the next level.

In many school districts, nurses began communicating with parents long before the doors were opened. They sent out letters informing parents of the school’s safety procedures and protocols. They spoke to nervous parents over the phone and answered online inquires via social media.

School nurses were often present at school board meetings in the weeks leading up to reopening. They were there to answer questions and alleviate the concerns of parents fearful about sending their children back. Nurses even spent time discussing things with staff members, reassuring them that everything was under control.

A Long History of Care

It is unfortunate that school nurses are often forgotten by the general public. Forgetting about them is understandable given the many pressures we face day-to-day, but it is still unfortunate that they do not get the recognition they are due. For more than 100 years, skilled nurses have been on the front lines of school safety.

According to the New York Times, school nursing in this country started way back in 1902 in the Big Apple. It was nurse Lina Rogers who took the plunge, going to work on New York’s lower East side. She became the very first public health nurse and the first school nurse in the country. She was responsible for providing services to four separate schools serving 10,000 students.

A big part of her job was to educate parents about common diseases and infections. Along with Rogers, New York’s schools had 24 additional nurses serving 100 schools by spring of the following year. Other cities learned from New York’s example and began hiring their own nurses.

In New York City today, there are some 10,000 students who take prescription medication daily. Nurses handle that for the most part. But they also handle everything from stomachaches to runny noses. And now, they are also heading up coronavirus screening. What more could we possibly ask of them?

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Cope When You Hate Your Job

Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.

Even without the added pressure of a pandemic, working in healthcare is just plain hard. On any given day, it can be mentally, emotionally, or physically exhausting—on its worst day, a combination of all three—and the reasons you found yourself wanting to work in the field may be long forgotten, replaced with resentment and regret. So, how do you cope, when you no longer love your job? Here are five ideas to try.

Identify What You Dislike

You cannot fix a problem, unless you know what the problem is. It’s easy to say, “I hate my job,” but, surely, you don’t hate everything about it. Take a hard look at what is plaguing you. What is it that is burning you out? Is it the volume of your workload? An ornery coworker? The things you see in your specialty? Talk it through with yourself, a friend or partner, or a mental health professional, so you can truly identify where the problem lies and develop a plan to remedy the problem. It might be an easier fix than you think.

Remind Yourself Why You Chose Your Job

The power of positive thinking doesn’t fix everything, but it can certainly help. When you are feeling particularly down about your job, it might do you some good to remember why you chose your career path. If you were motivated to go into healthcare to help people, as most are, you are still helping people, even on your bad days. It’s easy to lose sight of the good, when buried beneath the bad—dig out by remembering the real, tangible, positive impact your career makes on lives every day.

Find a Battle Buddy

The buddy system might be something you haven’t thought about since grade school, but it is something that the U.S. military has used for years to increase morale, improve safety, promote problem-solving, and even prevent suicide. Battle buddies, as they are known in the military, can be beneficial in healthcare, as well. If you don’t already have a coworker you can vent to and with, make it your mission to find one. Talk things through on a regular basis, as a way to decompress and let go of negative feelings, and to also bond with your battle buddy, and allow them to do the same.

Give Yourself Something to Look Forward To

Though you may work long hours, you are not always on the clock. Make sure you spend your time outside of work mentally clocked out, as well. Fill your schedule with things you enjoy, be they socially distant time with friends and family, any number of hobbies, or even just a day in bed with your favorite TV show on the big screen. Or, better yet, reward yourself by planning a vacation. Either way, give yourself something to look forward to outside of work to get you through the day. Even if it’s something small, it may be the boost you need to make the hours tick by a little bit faster.

Look for a New Job

If all else fails, know that the role you are currently in is not the only one of its kind on the planet. Luckily, if you’re reading this article, you’re already on a healthcare job board. Take a look and see what else is out there. Who knows, you might end up in a job you just plain love.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Mental Health of Healthcare Workers Has Tanked Amid Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is clearly taking a toll on the mental health of our nation’s healthcare workers, according to the findings of our recent survey.

The COVID-19 pandemic is clearly taking a toll on the mental health of our nation’s healthcare workers, according to the findings of our survey on mental health on the frontlines.

The results, which appear to echo findings regarding the mental health of medical personnel on China’s frontlines, show a sharp decline in perceived mental health, as well as a sizable uptick in perceived work-related stress, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The survey, which saw responses from physicians, registered nurses, advanced practitioners, respiratory therapists, and more, asked healthcare professionals on the frontlines to rate their current mental health, as well as their mental health prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. On average, prior to the pandemic, respondents ranked their mental health as a 7.88 out of 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent. 5.44 out of 10 is how the same respondents rank their current mental health.

Respondents also expressed a negative view of their employers, with the average response mostly unfavorable (4.42/10) when asked how important they feel their mental health is to their employers.

The results were as follows, including select quotes from respondents.

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your mental health prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Average Answer: 7.88/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how would you rate your current mental health?
Average Answer: 5.44/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your level of work-related stress prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Average Answer: 6.08/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very low and 10 being very high, how would you rate your current level of work-related stress?
Average Answer: 8.15/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent, how well do you believe you are coping with your work-related stress?
Average Answer: 6.17/10

Most Commonly Used Coping Mechanisms:
1. Physical Activity
2. Humor
2. Talking to Family/Friends
3. Avoidance
4. Prescription Medication
5. Other
6. Yoga/Meditation
7. Alcohol
8. Therapy
9. Recreational Drugs

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel your job negatively impacts your mental health?
Average Answer: 7.6/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened your mental health?
Average Answer: 7.4/10

On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how important do you feel your mental health is to your employer?
Average Answer: 4.42/10

Is there anything else you would like to tell us regarding mental health and frontline medical workers?

“We need help. We aren’t getting it. I feel hopeless and like death is around every corner.”

“It is very stressful and depressing to work for months wearing masks, gowns and gloves and still try to deliver compassionate, effective, efficient, and personable care. No one cares about the staff’s mental health at all.”

“It’s fear of the unknown. There’s so much we don’t know about this virus—that’s frightening at times.”

“As a parent of three children dealing with the stress of bringing home COVID to my family and having no time to myself, having to do home schooling on my days off, has definitely made it exhausting and extremely high stress.”

“Essential or sacrificial?”

“You must to take care of yourself first in order to take care of anyone else, which includes your mental health. I really never understood this until the pandemic started to take its toll.”

“We mostly hear about doctors and nurses in the hospital, but therapists/dietitians/CNAs/dietary/housekeeping are also hit hard, ESPECIALLY in nursing homes because these residents are like family. Watching dozens of your “family members” die in a month is traumatizing. The first few you sob and sob, then you become numb to it, because it’s all you can do to keep going. If you cry over every death, there’ll be nothing left of you. But we don’t get the support we need to keep going. We’re treated like machines, expected to keep going, spend more and more hours and work to make sure we’re ready for a state infection control survey. We’re tired. I’m tired. I can’t handle a second wave.”

Prior to the pandemic, multiple occupations within the field were already considered high stress and the suicide risk was identified as being higher among nurses than any other profession, making the findings especially alarming. With experts predicting an escalating mental health crisis for Americans as a whole, it is especially important for healthcare professionals to be aware of their mental health, and to seek help as needed.

If you are struggling with your mental health, we urge you to ask for help. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can assist you in processing what you are experiencing. Reach out to them, if you need support at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Survey: Mental Health on the Front Lines

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, as well as the fifth straight month those on the frontlines have been treating COVID-19. How are you doing? Tell us here.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.

May is also the fifth straight month frontline medical workers have been tasked with treating patients who are battling COVID-19 in the United States, losing more than 90,000 of them along the way. That certainly takes a toll, and it appears to be causing, at least in part, some of those on the front lines to take their own lives, as well.

Two medical workers in one of the nation’s hardest hit areas, New York, died by suicide in the last month—Dr. Lorna Breen, the medical director of the emergency department at NewYork-Presbyterian Allen Hospital, and John Mondello, an emergency medical technician.

Working in healthcare can be incredibly draining—mentally, physically, and emotionally—with multiple occupations within the field being considered high stress and the suicide risk higher among nurses than any other profession. Add in a pandemic and it is more than understandable to be feeling less than your best, even if you are not working in a COVID unit.

So, how are you feeling? How is your mental health? How are you coping, or not coping, right now? We want to know.

Tell us in the survey below, and then be sure to read our tips on how to care for yourself while treating COVID-19 patients by clicking here.

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What coping mechanisms are you currently relying on to help you deal with work-related stress?*
On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel your job negatively impacts your mental health?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how much do you feel the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened your mental health?*
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On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being very little and 10 being very much, how important do you feel your mental health is to your employer?*
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Is there anything else you would like to tell us regarding mental health and frontline medical workers?

By submitting this form, you are giving your permission to HealthJobsNationwide.com to republish any responses included on this form in future content that may be used on our website or social media accounts.

Verify You're a Human:

If you are struggling with your mental health, we urge you to ask for help. You are just a call or text away from reaching professionals who can assist you in processing what you are experiencing. Reach out to them, if you need support at:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
  • The Crisis Text Line: Text TALK to 741741.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-TALK.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Top 10 Pandemic-Proof Healthcare Jobs

Healthcare is often touted as a recession-proof industry. But is it pandemic-proof? Given the number of available jobs, it seems so. See the most in-demand position types here.

Healthcare is often touted as a recession-proof industry. This is typically believed, because, even in the worst economic times, people still require medical care. However, it is proving not to be entirely pandemic-proof, with more than 40,000 healthcare professionals being laid off in March, when COVID-19 began to significantly impact nearly every industry in the United States.

Healthcare is still hiring for a surprisingly large number of positions, though, despite the pandemic continuing on, and not all of them are related to COVID-19, either.

Here are the top ten most in-demand positions right now, according to data from our job board.

1. Registered Nurse

Number of Available Jobs: 7,761
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, New York, Massachusetts
View All Registered Nurse Jobs →

2. Physician

Number of Available Jobs: 4,141
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, New York, Pennsylvania
View All Physician Jobs →

3. Speech Language Pathologist

Number of Available Jobs: 3,462
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Speech Language Pathologist Jobs →

4. Physical Therapist

Number of Available Jobs: 2,840
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Physical Therapist Jobs →

5. Nurse Practitioner

Number of Available Jobs: 2,222
States with the Most Available Jobs: New York, California, Connecticut
View All Nurse Practitioner Jobs →

5. Occupational Therapist

Number of Available Jobs: 2,222
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Occupational Therapist Jobs →

7. Physical Therapist Assistant

Number of Available Jobs: 1,833
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Physical Therapist Assistant Jobs →

8. Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant

Number of Available Jobs: 1,725
States with the Most Available Jobs: California, Texas, Illinois
View All Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant Jobs →

9. Respiratory Therapist

Number of Available Jobs: 1,703
States with the Most Available Jobs: Pennsylvania, Alaska, Florida
View All Respiratory Therapist Jobs →

10. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

Number of Available Jobs: 1,346
States with the Most Available Jobs: Texas, California, Virginia
View All Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Jobs →

Don’t see your position listed? That doesn’t mean it isn’t hiring. Search for it on our job board by clicking here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.