The 3 States with the Most Nursing Jobs

Hiring in healthcare is booming in 2020, adding more than 35,000 jobs in January alone. So, where are the nursing jobs? We break it down for you.

So far, hiring in healthcare is booming in 2020, adding more than 35,000 jobs in January alone, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics. So, where are the jobs? We analyzed data on our site and came up with the top three states with the most available openings for nurses right now, as well as a selection of noteworthy positions in each state.

1. California

Average Annual Registered Nurse Salary in California: $106,950

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Registered Nurse Jobs in California →

2. Texas

Average Annual Registered Nurse Salary in Texas: $72,890

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Registered Nurse Jobs in Texas →

3. Virginia

Average Annual Registered Nurse Salary in Virginia: $69,790

Noteworthy Openings in Virginia:

Click Here to Search Registered Nurse Jobs in Virginia →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

7 Reasons to Love Being a Nurse

It’s Valentine’s Day and love is in the air. But not only romantic love. Here are seven reasons nurses shared with us about why they love being nurses.

It’s Valentine’s Day and love is in the air. But not only romantic love. Here are seven reasons nurses shared with us about why they love being nurses, today and always.

1. I have a job that allows me to really make a difference in the lives of others, in a very hands-on kind of way. Sometimes, by helping to save that very life. That’s something to love, for sure. – Alana M.

2. There’s something to be said for the job stability this career path offers. I’ve been an RN for more than fifteen years and I have never had a problem finding a job, no matter where I’ve moved or what setting I’ve wanted to work in. I think that’s pretty unheard of in other careers. – Jennifer B.

3. I love that I get to help people AND earn a great salary doing so. The work isn’t always easy, but there are a lot of hard jobs out there that pay a lot less than being a nurse. I love my job, and I love my paycheck for doing it. – Ann R.

4. The connections I’ve made with patients and with my coworkers have given me a lot to be thankful for, a lot to love. I have been there in the time of need of many, and I’m blessed to say that. – Deidre N.

5. I love the flexibility of being a nurse. I’ve always been a night owl, and I’m a big fan of the fact that I get to work the night shift. Can’t do that with a regular 9 to 5. – Katherine W.

6. I’m always learning. Every single day that I have done this job, I have learned something. And I’ve been doing it for twenty-two years. I love that. – Mary M.

7. Being a nurse, especially in the ER, keeps you on your toes. I am never bored at work, and that’s a good thing. Even if my feet sometimes kill me, I still love it. – Daniel G.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

5 Shoes Nurses Swear By

On average, nurses walk 4-5 miles during a 12-hour shift. If your feet are aching, it might be time to consider these five pairs that other nurses swear by.

It’s no secret that nurses spend a lot of time on their feet. Studies have found that a nurse will walk between four and five miles over the course of the average 12-hour shift—that adds up to between 728 and 910 miles per year, on average. Needless to say, if you are on your feet that much, you are going to need a comfortable pair of shoes. If your feet are aching, it might be time to consider these five pairs that other nurses swear by.

Nurse Mates Align™ Velocity

Source: Nurse Mates

Featured Review:
I’ve been an RN for 20 years and this is by far the most comfortable, practical shoe I’ve ever worn! I have no aches or pains after 12 hours on my feet. I recently had hip surgery and this has helped in the alignment of my leg and into my back for sure!! Will definitely purchase again!

Dansko Women’s Professional Clog

Source: Dansko

Featured Review:
As a generally practical soul, I’m not one to rave about footwear. However, these shoes deserve all of the accolades and more. As a nurse, I work a combination of 8 and 12 hour shifts, the occasional 16 hour, and the VERY occasional 20 hour when staffing gets really hairy. I recently worked one such 20 hour shift; I came in 4 hours early, stayed 4 hours late, and then when they couldn’t find anyone to relieve me, stayed until the next shift showed up… [A]t the end of that 20 hours, my feet were still singing the Hallelujah Chorus rather than Get Off On The Pain. And that, in my little world of long-suffering, racing from bed alarm to bed alarm, and hoisting hundreds of pounds of human flesh on and off of the bedside commode, is worth its weight in gold.

Crocs Women’s Neria Pro II Clog

Source: Crocs

Featured Review:
I’m a nurse and on my feet all day long. I bought two pairs of the Women’s Neria Pro II Clog, one black and one white. They fit snug because they were pushing down on the top of my feet. but I did the trick of putting them in hot boiling water for 45 seconds and then wearing thick socks with them until it cool down and formed big enough for my liking. They are so comfortable!! And perfect! I work in a plasma center, and I’m telling all my co-workers about them. Nobody like fluids getting stuck on my feet. Easily washed. I will be ordering again next summer for sandals.

Brooks Ghost 12

Source: Amazon

Featured Review:
I had been wearing Asics for years because they were recommended by my podiatrist. Actually just bought a pair before purchasing these. All I have to say is , wow. I immediately noticed the difference in comfort as soon as I put them on and realized what the Asics have always lacked. The arch support on these are perfect for me. Not too much, but just enough. The toe box is perfect for me in the wide and they don’t rub anywhere the wrong way. I m also pretty heavy on my heels when I I walk and these made me instantly feel like I had a new pep in my step and my heels haven’t been hitting since. I’m a nurse on my feet for hours and I wore these without having to break them in. And the colors are great too!

New Balance Women’s FuelCore Nergize V1 Cross Trainer

Source: New Balance

Featured Review:
Okay, so let me just start off my saying I am an Emergency Department nurse at a trauma center where we always have lines out the door, and I love these shoes! I am on my feet for 12+ hours at a time, and most of that is walking and moving. I rarely stand for long periods of time like some other nurses, but for moving constantly at a steady pace these are great. I originally got these to switch from day to day with a pair of more colorful under armor shoes to give my feet some relief thinking that I would wear these when the other ones hurt my feet but I find myself wearing these more and more!

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.

When The Nurse Is Stretched Too Thin

Nurses can be pushed to the breaking point, driven to the precipice of burnout, compassion fatigue, and utter defeat. But there is another way.

From Nurse Keith’s Digital Doorway

In all likelihood, we can all readily agree that nursing is not for the faint of heart. Nurses in many different settings can be pushed to the breaking point, driven to the precipice of burnout, compassion fatigue, and utter defeat. But there is indeed another way.

Nurses are often seen as strong figures who can tend to the sick, stand on their feet for hours on end, simultaneously care for multiple critical patients, and document it all like a pro. Many years ago, I wrote about the Sisyphean nature of nursing, a topic I should probably revisit sooner than later.

We can think of the nurse as Sisyphus, pushing a boulder uphill with no hopes of tomorrow being any different. We can also consider the metaphor of the elastic band stretched beyond its capacity. Our breaking points are individual, as are the events or circumstances that will trigger our breakdown or moment of snapping.

What’s Your Capacity?

Nurses, it’s up to you to determine for yourself what your capacity for stress and unhappiness really is. No one on the outside can really tell you what you should or shouldn’t be feeling on the inside. Your ability to determine your own capacity is part of your emotional intelligence and your personal insight into the workings of your own psyche.

The nurse who brags that she can face any challenge or work any number of shifts without blinking an eye is probably lying — either to you, or to herself. We’ve all probably encountered those highly seasoned nurses — some would derogatorily label them as “Old Battle Axes” — who, for all intents and purposes, seem impervious to all negativity or stress. Their jaded outward personalities probably belie what may be going on inside of them; they may actually so far gone, they can’t even feel their own feelings. This is the opposite of emotional intelligence.

Nurse, you need to determine your own capacity for every aspect of your work environment and professional experience:

  • How many hours can you work in any given week and still feel somewhat functional and human at home?
  • How much bullying and aberrant behavior are you willing to tolerate without taking action?
  • Is there a type of negative workplace culture that you feel you could actually work in without it impacting you in damaging ways?
  • What level of dysfunctional management is permissible?
  • How little teamwork and collaboration is accepted in your workplace?
  • What other areas of your work life are you able or unable to tolerate?

Why Do You Stay?

If your workplace leaves much to be desired, one of the initial questions to ask yourself is, “Why do I stay?” If you’re only staying because of the money, that’s probably not going to seem like enough as symptoms of stress-based illness begin to arise, or you’re just too depressed and despondent to take any action whatsoever.

You may be caught in a moment of simply feeling too beaten up by your work to even consider making a change. This type of ennui and loss of energy to create change in your life can have dire consequences, especially if you’re tolerating bullying, the sabotaging of your patient care by colleagues (we know this happens, folks), or other behaviors that put your license — and your patients — at risk.

Remaining in a job that’s killing you is not recommended, nor is it mentally, physically, or emotionally healthy. Some might even say it can be spiritually damaging to stay in work that doesn’t feed your heart and soul and/or detracts from your self-esteem and self-worth.

Determining why you’re choosing to stay may reveal very clearly that you have every reason to leave. How much are you willing to take? When will you put your foot down and say, “no more”?

Cultivating Nurse Resilience

Nurse resilience comes in many forms. Your resilience may come from cultivating the courage and ability to speak up to managers and executive and share your opinions about your workplace, or stand up for nurses on the receiving end of bullying and aggression.

Resilience may come from a variety of sources, including but not limited to:

  • Engaging the services of a counselor or therapist to help you navigate the challenges of your professional life
  • Using career coaching as a means to discover what you love about your career and how to instigate healthy change
  • Speaking with supportive colleagues, friends, or family
  • Studying meditation, yoga, mindfulness, Reiki, or other modalities
  • Take a course on cultivating emotional intelligence
  • Guard your time off and use it wisely in the interest of self-care and personal wellness
  • Turn to faith leaders for support and wise counsel
  • Focus on your physical health and well-being
  • Allow yourself to explore new career paths and professional options
  • Finding and strengthening your most resilient self is essential to counteracting those moments, days, weeks, months, or even years when you’re stretched too thin and come dangerously close to reaching your breaking point.

Why allow yourself to get to the point of snapping from the strain? Why not cultivate resilience, as well as strategies for surviving and thriving rather than tolerating what’s unhealthy? No one can do this work for you, but you can enlist the help of those who can make the journey easier.

Push Back

If your work is like pushing a rock uphill day after day, something has to give. Are you going to push back against unsafe staffing and high nurse-patient ratios? Will you join the union and seek greater protection from poor management? Will you speak up and call the unit bully on her horrible behavior? Are you going to say “no” the next time you’re asked to cover yet another extra shift?

How you push back is up to you, but push back you must. When the going gets tough, your job is to build up your resilience, take action, and push back against what is making your miserable. The ultimate push back may be giving your notice, and that is sometimes the only way. However, if you’re dedicated to your workplace and want to fight the good fight, enlist courageous colleagues willing to stand by your side.

When you’re stretched too thin, it’s time for action. When you’re pushed beyond your limit, recognize what those limits really are and how to protect them from ever being threatened again.

Staying may work, or it may be impossible. Leaving may be the only way out, or there may be other solutions. If you’re experiencing the cognitive dissonance of workplace demands beyond your capacity to meet those demands, it’s time to consider your options.

Don’t allow your well-being, health, and happiness to be compromised by your work. This profession of nursing should feed your soul, pay your bills, and bring you fulfillment and positive self regard. If something else is happening in your work life and career, it’s time for a new plan and a new lease on life.


Keith Carlson, RN, BSN, NC-BC, is the Board Certified Nurse Coach behind NurseKeith.com and the well-known nursing blog, Digital Doorway. Please visit his online platforms and reach out for his support when you need it most.

Keith is the host of The Nurse Keith Show, his solo podcast focused on career advice and inspiration for nurses. From 2012 until its sunset in 2017, Keith co-hosted RNFMRadio, a groundbreaking nursing podcast.

A widely published nurse writer, Keith is the author of Savvy Networking For Nurses: Getting Connected and Staying Connected in the 21st Century and Aspire to be Inspired: Creating a Nursing Career That Matters. He has contributed chapters to a number of books related to the nursing profession. Keith has written for Nurse.com, Nurse.org, MultiBriefs News Service, LPNtoBSNOnline, StaffGarden, AUSMed, American Sentinel University, Black Doctor, Diabetes Lifestyle, the ANA blog, American Nurse Today, NursingCE.com, Working Nurse Magazine, and other online and print publications.

Mr. Carlson brings a plethora of experience as a nurse thought leader, keynote speaker, online nurse personality, social media influencer, podcaster, holistic career coach, writer, and well-known nurse entrepreneur. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico with his lovely and talented wife, Mary Rives, and their adorable and remarkably intelligent cat, George. (You can find George on Instagram by using the hashtag #georgethecatsantafe.)

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Highest Paying U.S. Metro Areas for Nurses

If your 2020 job search has you considering a change of scenery, you may want to consider these metro areas offering top pay for nurses.

If your 2020 job search has you thinking of a change of scenery, you may want to consider taking a job in California. While the cost of living in some areas of the state can be above the national average, all of the top ten highest paying metro areas happen to be located within the state lines, as well. In fact, out of more than 500 metro locations, nineteen of the top twenty are located there—the only non-California area to rank that high was Honolulu, Hawaii in 16th place.

Take a look at the top ten metro areas offering the highest average annual salaries for nurses as determined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics—as well as some high-ranking cities not in California, all offering above the national average annual RN salary of $71,730.

Highest Paying Metro Areas for Nurses

1. Salinas, CA – $131,710
2. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA – $128,990
3. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA – $128,610
4. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA – $127,440
5. Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, CA – $120,530
6. Vallejo-Fairfield, CA – $115,900
7. Stockton-Lodi, CA – $111,140
8. Napa, CA – $106,060
9. Modesto, CA – $106,040
10. Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA – $104,680

Honorable Mentions (Not In California)

16. Urban Honolulu, HI – $99,600
22. Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH – $95,270
24. Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA – $93,570
29. Danbury, CT – $91,680
30. New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA – $91,160
31. Eugene, OR – $90,850
32. Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, HI – $89,290
35. Salem, OR – $88,460
36. Anchorage, AK – $88,170
37. Bend-Redmond, OR – $88,100

Thinking of relocating? Start your job search now by clicking here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Nurses Rank Highest in Honesty, Ethics

Well done, nurses. For the 18th year in a row, Americans have named you as the most honest and ethical professionals in the country.

For the 18th year in a row, Americans have ranked nurses as the most honest profession, according an annual poll conducted by Gallup.

The poll, which asks Americans to rank the honesty and ethical standards of people in various professions, found that 85% of Americans rate nurses as having “high” or “very high” honesty and ethical standards, yet again outpacing every other profession.

Nurses have consistently ranked higher than all other professions, receiving 84% of the vote in 2018, 82% in 2017, and 84% in 2016. However, they are not the only medical professionals Americans rate highly, with doctors (65%), pharmacists (64%), and dentists (61%) all ranking in the top five this year, and none of the medical professions included in the poll ranked outside of the top ten.

This year, the least honest professions according to Americans were car salespeople (9%), members of Congress (12%), and Senators (13%).

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

2 of the Best Diet Plans for Nurses with a Hectic Schedule

For nurses, adhering to a diet on a hectic schedule can seem nearly impossible. However, if you vowed to lose weight in 2020, these plans may help.

By Adela Ellis, RN, BSN

In theory, dieting seems like an easy concept: After all, it’s simply a process of eating less and exercising more to achieve a calorie deficit that allows us to reduce body fat, right? Anyone who has dieted, however, will tell you just how challenging it is to stick to that seemingly simple plan and, for nurses, adhering to a diet on a hectic schedule can seem nearly impossible.

For nurses, finding the time for regular meals on alternating night and day shifts can be a hassle. With 12-hour shifts, you get busy, end up exhausted, and eat whatever is available whenever you have the chance. This can be a reality that is seemingly impossible to overcome. But it doesn’t have to be! When many of us think of dieting, we think of harsh, impossible to follow restrictions that are doomed to fail, leading to yo-yo dieting and repeated unsuccessful attempts.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to make radical changes to begin losing weight: You simply need to stick to a series of small ones. A healthy diet plan can teach you to reconsider how you eat, not only what you eat. The following diet plans can help nurses develop a new lifestyle while boosting metabolism, energy, and weight loss for overall well-being and a longer, happier, and healthier life.

Plant-Based Diet

There are many plant-based diets to choose from, and all emphasize consuming foods that are known for their heart-health benefits, including veggies, whole grains, fruits, legumes, nuts, and oils. Based on the consumption of foods that are found in Italy and Greece, such as fish and seafood, extra virgin olive oil and olives, vegetables, fruits, seeds, and nuts, the Mediterranean Diet is renowned as heart-healthy and waistline-friendly lifestyle, and is another healthy choice, though not entirely plant-based. It is one of several types of flexitarian diets you could try.

Plant-based diets are rich in vitamins, minerals, and fiber and help to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. They are also known for their ability to reduce the risk of diabetes and help an individual maintain a healthy weight. Diets that are based on consuming nutrient-rich plant-based foods are particularly suited to the hectic lifestyle of nurses because they are based on a relatively simple concept of eating that encourages lifelong healthy eating habits.

To follow a plant-based diet, adopt more plants, fruits, veggies, and healthy fats into your diet and lower your consumption or eliminate completely any animal foods, including red meat, cold cuts and processed meats, poultry, fish and seafood, and animal-based milks and cheeses. Look for plant-based milks and cheeses in your supermarket or health-food store.

When composing a plant-based meal, half of your plate should be covered in colourful fruit and a variety of veggies. The other half should be divided between healthy proteins, such as nuts and seeds and beans and whole grains, including brown rice and whole grain bread. There are many plant-based protein products available in most supermarkets, and more on the way, so be on the lookout for them. Remember, the types of plant foods you choose matter.

Limit Avoid Choose Instead
Butter Trans fats Olive oil, canola oil, plant-milk-based butters
Animal-produced milk, juice Soda Water, tea, plant-based milks like soy, oat, or almond
White rice, white bread Sugary bread Whole-wheat bread, whole-wheat pasta
All meats, animal milk cheese Bacon, cold cuts, processed meats Beans, nuts, seeds, nut cheeses, vegetable-based protein products

Meal Prep Tip: For an easy plant-based diet meal, try your hand at Vietnamese spring rolls with tofu. Traditional spring rolls are made of rice roll skins and filled with mint leaves, lettuce, prawns, rice noodles, strips of carrot and cucumber and accompanied with a peanut dipping sauce, but the above recipe substitutes crispy tofu for the prawns. However, you can try any variation of veggies, lean vegetable-based proteins, whole grain rice, spices, and herbs for an easy make-ahead meal that is healthy, refreshing, and delicious and will have your favorite pair of scrubs fitting a little more comfortably.

Carb Cycling

Carbohydrate cycling diet plans have been used in the bodybuilding world for years as an easy way to monitor carbohydrate intake to build muscle while shedding fat. The basic principle behind carb cycling involved altering your carbohydrate intake according to your needs that week, month, or year. This revolves around the concept that, when your body consumes a limited number of carbs, it uses the body’s stored fat as its fuel source, which can boost fat loss and revamp the metabolism.

By strategically eating carbs according to when you need them, you can more efficiently use them rather than storing them on your body as fat. Carb cycling is an excellent choice for nurses because, just like a professional weight trainer, your schedule and energy needs vary throughout the week. For “on days,” your body requires more carbs for energy and for “off days,” it requires less. The beauty of carb cycling for nurses is that it is entirely customizable according to your schedule. For example, say you work three night shifts per week. Your meals for those three days should be high in healthy carbohydrates while your calories on the four remaining days should come from plant and other protein sources.

On high carb days, try to ensure you are getting about 60% of your calories from complex carbs. With carb cycling, it is important to remember that quality matters: high-carb does not equate to pizza and French fries. In fact, on low-carb days, it is particularly important to choose fiber-packed carbohydrate sources, as achieving adequate fiber consumption every day is still essential.

High Carb Days

Avoid Choose Instead
French fries Sweet potatoes
Sugary cereals Oatmeal
White rice, white bread Whole-wheat bread, whole-wheat pasta, quinoa
Soda drinks, sports drinks Fruits

Low Carb Days

Avoid Choose Instead
Fruits Lean proteins
Starchy vegetables, such as potatoes and corn Leafy greens, eggplant, tomatoes, broccoli, peppers, avocados
Trans fats Olive oil, nuts, seeds, fatty fishes

Meal Prep Tip: For an easy, high-carb breakfast in the morning, prepare some overnight oats in a mason jar containing oats, almond milk, cinnamon, flax seeds, honey, and apples. Conversely, for low-carb breakfasts, make muffin pan egg omelettes that can be reheated in the morning containing eggs, peppers, shredded chicken, avocados, and a sprinkling of cheese.

Don’t be afraid to change things up if your diet is not working for you. Part of finding a healthy and sustainable diet is finding the right mix of both habits and foods that contribute to your overall health and well-being, and that process is sure to involve trial and error. Developing a healthy lifestyle as a nurse may seem challenging, but it can be done. In a few months, your new diet will be so routine that you’ll only wonder why you didn’t start sooner.


Adela Ellis is a full-time nurse and part-time ambassador for Infinity Scrubs. Adela attended the University of Arizona and has been a travel nurse for the last 6 years. She enjoys working with different doctors, nurses, and patients from all over the country and blogging about her experiences. In her free time, she loves true-crime podcasts and cooking for friends and family.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our 5 Most Popular Nursing Articles of 2019

With 2019 nearly in the rearview, we’re taking a look back at our most popular articles of the year. Read them here.

With 2020 right around the corner, we thought it would be a good time to look back at our most popular articles of 2019. Given they all had plenty of views, there’s a chance you might’ve seen some of them before. However, take a look at the list below for our top five most popular blogs, in case you missed some of these great reads the first time around.

1. The #1 Reason Nurses Leave Their Jobs


Nurse turnover remains a problem for hospitals year after year. So, what is the main factor driving nurses away from their jobs?
Read More →

2. How to Cope When You Hate Your Job


Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.
Read More →

3. Suicide Risk Among Nurses Higher than Non-Nurses


Nurses are at a higher risk of suicide than the general population according to the findings of the first national investigation into nurse suicide in over twenty years.
Read More →

4. Tips for Surviving the Night Shift


Bucking your biology and working the night shift can take some getting used to. Here are some tips to make transitioning to nights a little easier.
Read More →

5. Viral Photo of Exhausted Nurse Rallies Praise for Profession


A photo posted to Facebook of an RN, clad in blue scrubs and crying her eyes out, has awakened scores of praise for nurses and all they do.
Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

5 Tips to Make the Most of Your Holiday Nursing Shift

It can be hard to work on the holidays, but if you work in a hospital setting, it can also be hard to avoid. Here are 5 tips to make the most of your holiday nursing shift.

It can be hard to work on the holidays, but if you work in a hospital setting, it can also be hard to avoid. While most private practices and clinics will be closed, hospitals don’t have holiday hours—illness and injuries don’t stop because the holidays are here. If you’re scheduled for a shift this holiday season, here are five tips for making the most of your holiday while stuck at work.

Do Some Decorating

Be it the lounge or yourself, decorate for the holidays. From holiday scrubs to an adorable nursing themed garland, there are plenty of ways to spruce up your surroundings and yourself to be more festive than on an average shift. Getting in the spirit just might be the thing to boost your spirits.

Host a Potluck

Just because you can’t have a holiday dinner with your family, that doesn’t mean you can’t have one with your “work family.” Rather than a dull meal from the cafeteria, rally your coworkers to participate in a holiday potluck, featuring main dishes or sides from everyone’s religious and cultural backgrounds to ensure no one is left out.

Coordinate a Cookie Swap

If a potluck seems like too much of a commitment, try to organize a cookie swap. Invite your coworkers to bring in their favorite cookies to leave in the nurses’ lounge. If the holiday has you running from room to room and you don’t have time for a full meal, potluck style, this is a nice way to ensure everyone at least gets a treat. Homemade or store-bought, something sweet might do the trick to get you through your shift.

Make the Most of Your Breaks

Use your breaks to call or FaceTime family or friends you might be missing. Connecting with them over the phone, however briefly, might cheer you up, if you cannot be physically present. Or, spend your break commiserating with coworkers. A little venting might do you some good.

Focus on the Positive

Be it helping your patients and their families, who are also stuck in the hospital over the holiday, the hefty paycheck you’ll likely receive after your holiday shift, or knowing you’ll probably get the next holiday off, there is plenty to be thankful for. Fixate on the good, instead of the bad, and you’ll surely be a lot jollier.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

25 Holiday Wish List Must-Haves for Nurses

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Yule—no matter what you’re celebrating this holiday season, here are 25 things nurses should add to their holiday wish lists.

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Yule, Solstice—no matter what you will be celebrating this holiday season, here are 25 things nurses should add to their holiday wish lists. Or snag for themselves, because everyone deserves a treat every now and then. From an ultra-practical cell phone sanitizer to adorable bandage badge reels, there is something for everyone to love.

1. This Fancy Thing That Makes Nurse Fuel, $157.99

2. A Trusty Stethoscope, $94.78

3. A Phone Sanitizer, Because Germs, $79.95

4. Super Cozy Scrub Pants, $32.98+

5. Truthful Drinkware To Bookend Your Hardest Days, $29.95

6. These Adorable Bandage Badge Reels, $10.99

7. The Ultimate Self-Care Gift Box (Bonus: It’s Made By A Nurse), $60.00

8. This Beautiful (& Engravable) Necklace, $48.60+

9. An Efficient (But Effective) Gratitude Journal, $22.90

10. A Neck/Back/Shoulder/Everywhere Deep Tissue Massager, $43.99

11. A Ridiculously Cute Personalized Nurse Ornament, $14.95

12. A Cup to Keep Your Nurse Fuel Piping Hot, $34.99

13. A Personalized Stethoscope ID Charm, $13.00+

14. This Light Blocking Sleep Mask For You Night Shift Nurses, $14.44

15. This Extra Soft “Coffee, Scrubs, and Rubber Gloves” T-Shirt, $16.96

16. A Sweary Coloring Book For Nurses, $8.99

17. This Insanely Useful Thing That Makes Cooking After Your Shift A Breeze, $64.99

18. Some Stress Relief In A Jar, $15.18

19. These Colorful Therapeutic Compression Socks, $13.99

20. A Pair Of Seriously Supportive Shoes, $124.95+

21. This Hilariously Honest T-Shirt, $18.99+

22. A High-Quality Downloadable Art Print, $5.37

23. A Box of Blessings, $4.47

24. Some Luxurious Bath Bombs To Help You Unwind, $26.80

And Lastly…

25. A Foot Massager, Because What Nurse Doesn’t Have Aching Feet, $18.95

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.