7 Reasons to Love Working in Therapy

Love is in the air this Valentine’s Day. Not just romantic love, though. Here are seven reasons to love working in therapy.

Love is in the air this Valentine’s Day. Not just romantic love, though. Here are seven reasons therapy professionals shared with us about why they love working in therapy, today and all days.

1. “I make a difference in the lives of others through my work as a PT, and I love that I get to see the direct results of a job well done pay off in such a positive way for people.” – Louis P.

2. “I’ve lived and worked in seven different states in the last few years. Not a lot of jobs let you travel the way you can by working in therapy. I love that I get to see the world, or at least a bunch of the United States, and get paid for it.” – Amanda R.

3. “You get to make some really great connections with people in this line of work while positively impacting their lives. I love that.” – Sarah W.

4. “You’ve heard of the opioid crisis, right? Yeah. I get to be on the front line of saving lives by offering an alternative to that mess. Don’t do drugs. Do PT.” – Jason D.

5. “There is no better feeling than empowering other people to build confidence in themselves and their voice. Watching a patient achieve a goal, no matter how big or how small, makes being an SLP a monumentally rewarding profession.” – Alison D.

6. “I get to work with such a diverse group of people in my line of work. The stories I’ve been told, the things I have seen. I don’t think I could’ve experienced that in another job and I love that I have been able to interact with so many different and fascinating humans over the course of my career.” – Sandra C.

7. “I love that being an OT is an active job and that I’m never bored during my workday.” – Lance T.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Experiencing Burnout? Making These Changes Could Help.

Long hours, heavy caseloads, tedious documentation—PTs, OTs, and SLPs have all reported feeling those burdens. Here are steps you can take to beat burnout.

Burnout is a problem across most facets of healthcare, and therapy professionals are not exempt from this uniquely troublesome phenomenon. Long hours, heavy caseloads, tedious documentation, the rising costs of education—and in turn, mounting debt—and more are all contributing factors, and PTs, OTs, and SLPs have all reported feeling those burdens. If you find yourself fatigued, exhausted, and detached in regard to your career and your patients, it is likely you’re burnt out.

Here are three options to consider, which may help you get back to a life and a career you love.

Change Settings or Employers
If you’ve been plugging away in the same setting or with the same population over many years, the key to enjoying your career again could be as simple as making a shift in one of those areas. If you’ve been working in geriatrics, maybe it’s time to give pediatrics a try. Tired of the SNF you report to daily? Try an outpatient clinic. Or perhaps you’ll find joy with a different employer in the same setting and population. As the adage goes, “If you don’t like where you are, move. You are not a tree.” So, go forth and grow.

Consider A Non-Clinical Role
Another way to grow, and alleviate your burnout, is to explore non-clinical career avenues. If you’re not connecting with patients, take patients out of the equation. Some non-clinical career options include education, including becoming a CME instructor, utilization review, medical device training or sales, consulting, informatics, marketing, or healthcare copy writing or content writing.

Practice Mindfulness
If you’re not ready to make a complete shift in your career, which is understandable, as the risk of change may be even more frightening than “the devil you know,” practicing mindfulness may be all you need to get you through. Begin to practice meditation or yoga, keep a gratitude journal, take time to just breathe, partake in hobbies you enjoy outside of work, never take your work home with you, and make sure you are getting enough sleep each night.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapy Jobs Rank High on List of “Best Jobs”

Eight therapy jobs made it onto this year’s list of 100 Best Jobs. See what they are and where they ranked here.

U.S. News & World Report has released their oft-anticipated annual list of 100 Best Jobs for 2020 and, without a doubt, the healthcare industry is the clear winner, including those in therapy practice.

The list, which ranked jobs from 12 different industries based on multiple components—median salary, unemployment rate, 10-year growth volume, 10-year growth percentage, future job prospects, stress level, and work-life balance—was consumed by healthcare professions, accounting for 46 of the 100 jobs. Additionally, nearly all traditional therapy roles landed on the list, with one even ranking in the top ten.

See how they did below.

8. Speech-Language Pathologist
15. Physical Therapist
26. Physical Therapist Assistant
28. Occupational Therapist
40. Respiratory Therapist
64. Massage Therapist
69. Physical Therapist Aide
70. Occupational Therapy Assistant

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Highest Paying U.S. Metro Areas for PTs, OTs, & SLPs

Want to make top pay as a PT, OT, or SLP? You might want to consider looking for a job in one of these high-paying metro areas.

While the average annual salaries of PTs, OTs, and SLPS—$87,930, $84,270, and $77,510 respectively—are typically considered high-paying, salaries can vary based on location, due to cost of living and other factors.

If your 2020 job search has you considering a change in location, be it across the state or across the country, knowing which areas offer the highest pay can help you decide your next move.

Take a look at the top metro areas offering the highest average annual salaries for PTs, OTs, and SLPs as determined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics.

Highest Paying Metro Areas – Physical Therapists

  1. Ames, IA – $118,870
  2. Great Falls, MT – $116,580
  3. Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV – $115,240
  4. Yuma, AZ – $114,850
  5. Bakersfield, CA – $114,170
  6. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX – $112,500
  7. Prescott, AZ – $110,960
  8. Ithaca, NY – $110,620
  9. Morristown, TN – $108,340
  10. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA – $107,960

Highest Paying Metro Areas – Occupational Therapists

  1. Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV – $108,190
  2. Vallejo-Fairfield, CA – $106,270
  3. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA – $104,580
  4. Hattiesburg, MS – $104,250
  5. Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA – $103,120
  6. Visalia-Porterville, CA – $102,540
  7. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA – $102,480
  8. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX – $101,800
  9. Salinas, CA – $101,680
  10. Tyler, TX – $101,410

Highest Paying Metro Areas – Speech-Language Pathologists

  1. Napa, CA – $106,620
  2. Jackson, MI – $105,130
  3. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA – $103,890
  4. Vallejo-Fairfield, CA – $103,030
  5. Tulsa, OK – $102,680
  6. Wichita Falls, TX – $102,540
  7. Chico, CA – $101,990
  8. Battle Creek, MI – $101,810
  9. Gainesville, FL – $101,750
  10. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA – $101,380

Ready to start your search for a higher paying job? Click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Debt and the DPT

While it is a topic that has plenty of anecdotal evidence, a study has now been conducted on the oftentimes crippling debt burden of physical therapists.

While it is a topic that has plenty of anecdotal evidence, a study has now been conducted on the oftentimes crippling debt burden of physical therapists.

The small-scale study, which was authored by Steven Ambler, PT, DPT, MPH, PhD, surveyed members of the Florida Physical Therapy Association’s Early Professional Special Interest Group, all of whom were entry-level PTs practicing in Florida. The respondents, of which there were 86, answered questions relating to income, amount of debt held, and clinical practice choices. The study found that PTs who held a DPT most frequently reported debt ranging from $100,000 to $124,999, while the average salary of respondents was $69,328—a 197% debt to income ratio—and that PTs spend, on average, 22% of their monthly income on loan repayment.

The debt-to-income ratio identified by the study was more than double the estimated average ratio for family medicine physicians, who average a debt-to-income ratio of 80-90%, and also surpassed the average debt-to-income ratio for veterinarians, which is often estimated at 160-180%.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Kick off Your 2020 Job Search with These Awesome Therapy Jobs

If you’re a PT, OT, or SLP who made a resolution to find a new job in 2020, this list of openings is a fantastic place to start your search.

The ball has dropped and 2020 is here and, if you are like many others, the new year brings with it the resolution to find a new job. Perhaps you have stagnated in your current role, or you are seeking a position with higher pay or a more flexible schedule, or maybe this is the year you want to really mix things up and dive into travel assignments. Whatever the reason you are pursuing a change, we are behind you. Ready your résumé and take a look at some of the excellent opportunities available on our site to start your 2020 job search strong.

Physical Therapy Openings:

View All PT Openings →

Occupational Therapy Openings:

View All OT Openings →

Speech Language Pathology Openings:

View All SLP Openings →

Don’t see your dream job? Click here to see all available jobs on our site.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Our 5 Most Popular Therapy Articles of 2019

As 2019 winds down, we’re taking a look back at our most popular articles for PTs, OTs, and SLPs in 2019. Read them here.

As 2019 winds down, we thought it would be a good time to take a look back at our most popular articles from the year. Given they all had plenty of views, there’s a chance you’ve seen some of these before. However, take a look at the list below for our top five most popular therapy blogs, in case you missed some of these great reads the first time around.

1. How to Rehab Your Therapy Résumé


Whether or not you are actively searching for a new therapy job, keeping your résumé current is always smart. Here are some tips to get yours in top shape.
Read More →

2. PT, OT, and SLP Salaries in Every State


Using the latest data available from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, we dug up the average salaries for PTs, OTs, and SLPs across the United States.
Read More →

3. 5 Reasons to Give Travel Positions a Try


For those with a sense of adventure, travel positions need no other selling point. If you don’t have a natural love of travel, though, here are five other reasons to consider travel assignments.
Read More →

4. Your Therapy Practice’s Online Reputation Matters


Is your practice a 5-star facility according to Google, Yelp, Facebook, and so on? If not, here are some ways to help improve your online reputation.
Read More →

5. Transitioning into a Career as a Traveling Therapist


Traveling therapy roles are abundant, and they can do wonders for therapists who may be feeling as if they have stagnated in their current role or setting.
Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Holiday Injuries You’ll Likely See in Therapy Practice

It may be the most wonderful time of the year, but the holiday season comes with plenty of hazards, many of which will require therapy to recover from.

It may be the most wonderful time of the year, but the holiday season comes with plenty of hazards, many of which will require emergency treatment, and oftentimes therapy, as well. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission about 18,100 people were treated in emergency rooms due to holiday decorating-related injuries in 2017, and in 2018, there were approximately 166,200 toy-related ER-treated injuries. When you look at those numbers alone, it becomes pretty safe to assume your therapy practice will be bustling over the next few weeks. Here are the most common injuries you will likely see.

Slips

With winter weather comes ice, and the injuries that come with slipping on it. From broken ankles to muscle strains, it is very likely you’ll see patients who have taken a dive on a patch of ice.

Falls

Whether it is off a ladder while trying to hang decorations or at holiday party after drinking a little bit too much, falls are another big holiday hazard that’ll bring patients your way.

Cuts and Burns

There is no shortage of ways to hurt oneself in the kitchen, whether it’s while slicing a holiday ham or grabbing a too-hot tray of cookies barehanded, and if you work in hand therapy, these folks are likely headed your way.

Back Strains

From carting around heavy luggage on holiday travels, to failing to abide by “team lift” recommendations on that brand new TV, back injuries will be abundant this holiday season.

Sports Injuries

Whether it’s sledding, skiing, or just tossing the football around in the yard with the kids, there is high potential for injuries, including fractures, sprains, and strains.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Things to Put On Your Wish List as a PT, OT, or SLP

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa—no matter what you will be celebrating this holiday season, here is a list of awesome items to add to your holiday wish list as a PT, OT, or SLP.

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa—no matter what you will be celebrating this holiday season, here is a list of awesome items to add to your holiday wish list as a PT, OT, or SLP. From fun to functional, and at just about every price point, there is something for everyone.

This Funny (and Probably Accurate) T-Shirt, $16.99+

Fun Novelty Bone Pens, $11.99

This Sweet “Just Speechie” Shirt, $14.99

Drinkware to Bookend Your Hardest Days, $29.95

A Colorful (and Educational) Muscle Diagram, $14.69+

A Super Fancy Coffee/Tea Maker, $158.99

This Hand Stamped Heart Necklace, $10.00+

A Simple Art Print That Says It All, $5.00

This Handy Phone Sanitizer, $79.95

This Pretty PT or OT Pendant That Doubles As a Ring Holder, $42.00+

This Beautiful Sound Wave Watercolor Print, $21.75+

An Engraved OT Ornament, $10.99+

A Sassy (but True) SLP Sipper, $21.99

A Fun, Floral PT Print, $12.16

This Pep-Talking Mug, $16.99

These Adorable OT Badge Reels, $5.00

This Beautiful Journal to Keep Track of Your PT Journey, $6.99

A Boozy Therapeutic Activity CPT Code Glass, $7.00+

A Very Cool Vocal Cord Art Print, $21.75+

This Pretty and Powerful Shirt, $18.99+

A Charming OT Necklace, $26.34

Please note: HealthJobsNationwide.com receives no compensation for recommending these items and makes no warranties regarding their safety. Items listed above should be evaluated individually for potential risks and hazards.

This Year, Therapy Professionals Are Thankful For…

We asked and you answered: what has your career in therapy made you most thankful for? Here are ten of our favorite responses.

We asked and you answered: what has your career in therapy made you most thankful for? We received a lot of great responses, and we picked our top ten favorite answers to feature this week. Here they are.

My job isn’t always sunshine and roses, but seeing the look on a patient’s face when they do something they thought they couldn’t, that makes it all worth it. I’m grateful I get to be a part of that. —Regina T.

* * *

Honestly, I’m just grateful that I get to help people. There isn’t enough of that in this world, I think. —Charlie R.

* * *

I am thankful for every patient success I have been a part of, big and small. Knowing I can make a real difference for people is very rewarding. —Kelli W.

* * *

Helping others is what drew me to this career, so I’ll always be thankful I get to do that every single day. —Maryanne G.

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Working in therapy isn’t always easy. I’m in debt. I’m tired more than I’m not. Not every patient gets a win. It’s hard. I’m grateful for my family, friends, and coworkers who support me through it more than they’ll ever know. —Christina J.

* * *

I’ve seen a lot of suffering, a lot of pain in this job. To know I’ve helped people recover from that is truly satisfying. I’m very thankful and very blessed to be a PT. —Elizabeth T.

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I work with some truly exceptional people. I’m grateful for my team, the bonds we’ve formed, and the lives we’ve been able to touch along the way. —Jessica D.

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I get to hang out with some pretty awesome kids AND help change their lives. I love my job and I’m thankful for it. —Sarah R.

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My hardworking “work family” is the best and I’m really thankful for them. —Frank B.

* * *

This past week I had a patient tell me that they didn’t think they’d ever get to live without pain and thanked me for “saving [their] life.” I don’t know what’s more rewarding than that. I’m so thankful for our profession and the people we are lucky enough to serve. —David K.

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No matter what you are thankful for this year, we are thankful for you and all you do. Happy Thanksgiving from our family to yours.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.