For-Profit Hospital Finances Look Stable, Profit Margins Should Improve

Report says margins are improving, especially when systems shed less-profitable facilities.

from Healthcare Finance

The outlook for the U.S. for-profit hospital industry remains stable, according a recent Moody’s Investors Service report. Earnings are expected to grow in the low-single digits over the next 12 to 18 months, while volume and pricing trends will continue to be modestly positive. Profit margins are expected to stabilize after a significant drop between 2015 and 2016.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Study Shows Patients Like Remote Monitoring Via Mobile App for Follow-Up Care

Out of 32 women in the study who had access to the app, 30 (97%) agreed or strongly agreed that their follow-up care was convenient.

from HealthcareDive

One obstacle that has hindered adoption of technology in healthcare has been doubt over its ability to replace in-person care. However, results such as these are slowly helping to break down barriers holding technology back, especially as patients increasingly indicate their preference for more consumer-friendly services.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Ideas for Creating a More Engaged Workforce

Successful companies genuinely care about their employees and look for ways to engage them on all levels.

by Eileen O’Shanassy

Most business owners and managers know that the people working for them are the most essential resource for the success of their organization. Successful companies genuinely care about their employees and look for ways to engage them on all levels. Employers can forge a deeper connection with their workers by really understanding their needs and seizing opportunities to invest in their quality of life in the workplace. Having a happy and loyal workforce can mean more productivity and innovation for your business.

Creature Comforts

While most offices wouldn’t function well if the entire staff were lounging in reclining chairs, there is a lot to be gained by providing workers with enjoyable perks. For example, hiring a service like EpicVue to install TVs for semi-truck drivers to use during off-hours is a nice bonus for vehicle operators. Some companies also offer food or coffee to employees throughout the day, or maintain other facilities for their convenience. Make the working environment comfortable and more like somewhere you’d want to be.

Incentivize Performance

Motivated employees are a much more valuable asset than workers who don’t really care about the company’s objectives. Successful companies look for ways to align their employees’ motivation with their own, so that both parties can succeed at the same time. Rewarding workers for putting in extra effort through bonuses or other perks can greatly increase performance and loyalty of the staff.

Listen

Most companies operate through top-down management, at least most of the time. While it’s essential to create an environment where employees follow key instructions, it’s also important to stop and listen to their concerns. Owners and managers should regularly hold group discussions with their staff and make themselves available for private conversations. This gives the company a chance to address employee concerns or grievances before they become a big problem. 

Communicate Clearly

Confusion or uncertainty among workers can have a profound impact on their confidence in their employer, which can affect their performance, motivation, and engagement. The decision makers in any organization are responsible for clearing communicating their objectives. It’s also their responsibility to ensure that everyone involved completely understands their roles and duties in the project before they begin.

Every Company Needs Strong Culture

While the term “culture” is often thrown around casually in conversation regarding business management, it is actually an extremely important element of any company. Engaging the workforce requires the company’s decision makers to have a clear vision for the company and communicate those ideas to their employees. Creating culture takes time and effort, but the rewards are well worth it.

Having an engaged and motivated staff can benefit your company in more ways than one. Make sure you do everything you can to work with employees and make their life at work a little more like home.


Eileen O’Shanassy is a freelance writer and blogger based out of Flagstaff, AZ. She writes on a variety of topics and loves to research and write. She enjoys baking, biking, and kayaking. Check out her Twitter, @eileenoshanassy.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for 2017

A new report says poor information management and faulty CDS implementation pose risks to patients.

from HealthcareITNews

Health information technology holds enormous potential for improving patient safety, but only when implemented and used correctly. A new study from ECRI Institute spotlights EHR information management practices and clinical decision support as two areas of particular concern.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Tips to Prove You’re the Best Fit for Any Healthcare Job

No matter the job you’re interviewing for, you’re likely to be asked why you’re a good fit for the position.

by Eileen O’Shanassy

No matter the job you’re interviewing for, you’re likely to be asked why you’re a good fit for the position. Health care professionals are no stranger to this routine question, and those who know how to answer this question enjoy better opportunities than their peers, and are more likely to find jobs for which they’re well-suited to. This field requires a very special skill set, and demonstrating that you have those skills is crucial during the interview process. Here are five ways to demonstrate you’re a good fit for the job at hand. 

Show That You’re Personable

Being personable is absolutely essential in the health care field. Often called bedside manner, the way you interact with patients, their families, and other medical professionals will be a key factor in your ability to get and keep jobs. Be friendly, open, and courteous during your interview. Address tough questions with poise and confidence and make sure you connect on a personal level during the interview. Doing so demonstrates you’ll be able to handle difficult situations with patients, families, and your colleagues. 

Demonstrate Your Flexibility

Medical, laboratory, and dental facilities are ever-changing environments where new challenges are thrown your way every day. If you’re stuck in one pattern of behavior, or can only find one way to solve a problem, employers are unlikely to hire you. Show that you’re willing and able to use your problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to challenges with which you’re presented. Letting your interviewer know that you can adapt to diverse environments and learn new things is important. In an interview setting you can do this by using hypothetical problems, and highlighting past experiences where you solved a problem.

Use Your Communication Skills

In health care settings, good communication can actually mean the difference between life and death. Be sure to put all of your communications skills on display during your interview. Show that you know how to communicate with people from an array of backgrounds, and that you’re able to remain professional and friendly no matter what comes your way. Communicate with the proper technical terms and be sure to include different ways you’ve communicated through technology. Think of examples in your professional life where you’ve had to use strong communication skills, and be prepared to share them with your interviewer. 

Be Clear About How Your Training Matches the Job

Before you head into your interview, identify all training and licenses you possess that match the demands of the job. It’s important to show your interviewer you have relevant training and that you’ve demonstrated your ability to use a given skill set on a previous job or during your schooling. Remember that it’s also important to be candid if you are lacking any training that might be needed for the job. Many employers are willing to provide training for promising job candidates. You can also offer to become trained in programs like Integrity Support or other IT programs the clinic might already use. This is a great way to show your dedication right off the bat.

Show That You Know How to Remain Calm

Many health care jobs are in a high-pressure environment, and knowing how to stay calm during an emergency or crisis is essential. Think about past jobs or experiences where you’ve had to show grace under pressure, and be ready to talk about them with your interviewer. Staying calm and collected during your interview is also a great way to demonstrate this skill. If you don’t get flustered when you’re asked tough questions, your interviewer will likely assume you’ll bring the same poise to the workplace. 

Remember, knowing you’re a good fit before you go into an interview is crucial to both your success and your long-term happiness. Carefully read any job postings to which you respond. If you are lacking more than one or two of the expected skills and traits, find job openings that better meet your skills and talents. Doing so will allow you to gain valuable work experience while providing you the opportunity to acquire the right skills to land that dream job in the future. 


Eileen O’Shanassy is a freelance writer and blogger based out of Flagstaff, AZ. She writes on a variety of topics and loves to research and write. She enjoys baking, biking, and kayaking. Check out her Twitter, @eileenoshanassy.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Hospitals Could Bear the Financial Brunt of the American Health Care Act

How the GOP’s replacement of the ACA could impact healthcare providers.

from STAT

The stakes couldn’t be higher for America’s hospitals in the debate over the GOP replacement for Obamacare. Here’s a quick breakdown of the top issues to watch and how they could impact providers across the country.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How Do You Know You Want to Be a Nurse?

Thinking about becoming a nurse? If so, here are some great points you may want to consider.

by Lisa M. Tufts, RN

So, you have decided to go to nursing school… why? Let’s see if this is the right career path for you. Whether it is your first or second career choice, there are questions you should ask yourself before you spend the time, money, and energy it takes to follow a path that leads you to a career where your job is to care for people who are acutely and chronically ill. So, ask yourself some important questions:

  • Have you ever been in a hospital, as a worker, a patient, a visitor?
  • What is your current career and does it relate?
  • What interests you in nursing? If you are choosing nursing for monetary reasons, then you are you choosing it for the wrong reasons. First of all, nurses, especially new nurses, do not make a lot money. Second, unless you can afford to pay cash for your education, you need to pay back your student loans after your graduate. Last, you need advanced education, which cost even more money to make an advanced salary with years of experience, so forget that idea.
  • Have you ever cared for a sick person?
  • Have you ever worked in a hospital or nursing home?
  • Do you realize that you will be working with bodily fluids? Yes, all the bodily fluids. The job is not glamorous.

Do yourself a favor if you are thinking about going to nursing school, and get a job as a nursing assistant. This is a great place to start to determine if a career in nursing is for you.

Frankly, I believe being a nursing assistant should be a requirement to becoming a nurse.

If you are already in nursing school and not working as a nursing assistant, you should. You need the experience of caring for patients at the basic level. You will be surprised at how much you will learn as a nursing assistant, especially when the nurses that you work with know that you are a nursing assistant—they can and will show you things, like wound care, for example. You will get opportunities to see things as a nursing assistant that you might not see in nursing school. This will be very beneficial toward your education and experience. It also shows that you are serious about your nursing career.

Think about it; who would a Nurse Manager want to hire? The new grad with patient care experience, or the new grad who has been working at a grocery store while they are in school.


Lisa Tufts began her career in healthcare as Certified Nursing Assistant at the age of 17. Since then she has remained in healthcare in various roles from Medical Coding, Executive Assistant, Medical Assistant, and has not been a Registered Nurse for six years.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

20 Medical Technology Advances: Medicine in the Future

Dr. Bertalan Mesko, PhD, discusses 20 technologies that will shape the future landscape of medicine.

from Medical Futurist

As there are so many amazing things going on worldwide in medicine and healthcare, a shortlist of some of the greatest ideas and developments would give us a glimpse into the future of medicine. It is always a challenge to detect the projects with the biggest potential to be used in everyday medical practices, but here are the most promising candidates for fulfilling this notion.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare Remains a Ripe Target for Cybercriminals

Forrester, a research and consulting firm, offers healthcare organizations cybersecurity guidance as 2017 shapes up to be an uncertain year.

from Healthcare IT News

As most everyone in healthcare will remember, health insurer Anthem suffered a data breach in 2015 that affected as many as 80 million patients. While healthcare did not witness a breach of that scale in 2016, numerous hospitals fell victim to ransomware attacks, and healthcare security budgets continued to lag behind those of other industries, according to Forrester Research.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Hospitals Find Ways to Serve Patients on Demand

Extended hours, same-day appointments are fine, but not nearly enough to give today’s consumers the convenience and access they demand.

from Hospitals and Health Networks

Calling the physician’s office. Making an appointment. Driving to a medical clinic near a hospital. Waiting. Those well-worn steps for reaching health care services are falling away as health systems reposition themselves with bold new access strategies.

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