That Moment You Realize the Doctor Is a Wannabe Rock Star

Search as many physician jobs as you want on our job board, and we’re betting you won’t find any that require musical skills. Musical ability has nothing to do with providing quality medical care. But that has not stopped a group of physicians in suburban Chicago from not only learning to play, but also using their musical talents to thank nurses and support staff.

 Imagine that moment the staff realized some of their doctors were wannabe rock stars. Imagine seeing a doctor you work closely with, day after day, doing his best Jimmy Buffet impression – just to make you smile. What recently happened at Central DuPage Hospital undoubtedly made a lot of people happy. The healthcare industry needs more of it.

 Plenty of Bad News

 We do not have to look far to find bad news in healthcare. There is plenty of it. From physician burnout to nurses leaving clinical work in droves, we could spend all day focusing on the problems. Those problems do need some attention, but they shouldn’t command all of our attention. There is more than enough good to focus on.

 Some of that good was tapped into by Northwestern Medicine’s Dr. Anthony F. Altimari, M.D. According to the Daily Harald, Altimari’s love of music goes beyond just the music itself. He finds it therapeutic. When the stresses of his profession start getting to him, he picks up his guitar and goes to town.

Altimari is apparently not alone. He has made it his mission to encourage colleagues at Central DuPage to do the same thing. Many of them have. So much so that a bunch of them got together and put on a concert for hospital staff. The concert was a way for them to show their appreciation for how hard nurses and support staff worked during the COVID pandemic.

 Doctors Are People Too

 Physician jobs are a dime a dozen. That being the case, it is easy for the rest of us to forget that doctors are people too. They have families to take care of. They have bills to pay, houses to maintain, and cars that need to go into the shop for work. They also have their dreams and ambitions outside of medicine.

 Some of the nursing staff at Central DuPage were probably shocked to discover that the doctors they work with are also wannabe rock stars. But why should that be so unusual? Music is universal. People love it wherever you go. Furthermore, far more people possess musical talent than actually use it to benefit others.

 Your surgeon may have the steadiest hands in the business. And if so, you probably appreciate that. But perhaps those same hands are capable of performing guitar licks that would rival anything Jimmy Hendrix produced. Then again, maybe your highly skilled surgeon couldn’t carry a note in a bucket. You just don’t know.

 The Good Side of Medicine

 If nothing else, nurses and support staff at Central DuPage recently got a break from their stressful jobs. They got to enjoy the good side of medicine brought to them by a group of rocker doctors who just happen to be very good on their instruments. What a sight that must have been for the staff.

 Are you currently on the hunt for good physician jobs? If so, remember that there is more to life than work. Do whatever job you eventually land to the best of your ability. But do not hesitate to pursue other interests as well. You might be able to use those interests to do something good for others.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Helping Healthcare Workers Combat Compassion Fatigue

The last few years have been extremely hard for healthcare workers. Doctors, nurses, and other healthcare personnel often struggle with long hours and stress, and the pandemic has only made things worse. The trauma of directly confronting the consequences of COVID-19 has caused many people to develop a stress and trauma-related phenomenon known as compassion fatigue.

 Compassion fatigue is a common problem among people who work in high-intensity, stressful jobs involving other people. This advanced form of burnout often leads to people leaving these critical fields for their own health and well-being. So, what can be done to help prevent or reverse compassion fatigue?

 What is Compassion Fatigue?

 Compassion fatigue occurs in people who have careers focusing on helping others in difficult situations. Healthcare workers, counselors, social workers, and other professionals are at the highest risk of developing compassion fatigue.

 Essentially, compassion fatigue occurs when people work long hours while working with people who are sick and dying, struggling with severe mental health issues, or are victims of violence and trauma. Confronting these tragedies on a daily basis takes its toll, leading to extreme exhaustion, burnout, and secondhand trauma.

 Everyone experiences work-related stress at some point during their careers. Many people also develop burnout from working under stressful conditions for too long without rest. However, compassion fatigue takes these problems to an even higher level, due to the nature of the jobs that cause it.

 Compassion fatigue should be taken very seriously. Burnout on its own is bad enough, but the secondary trauma caused by compassion fatigue is even more serious. In addition to causing a range of physical and mental symptoms in the short term, compassion fatigue can even lead to PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).

 Symptoms of Compassion Fatigue

 If you work in healthcare, it’s important to know how to spot the symptoms of compassion fatigue in yourself and others. Some of these symptoms affect one’s ability to work and care for patients, while others affect personal health and well-being. Signs and symptoms of compassion fatigue to watch out for include:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Reduced decision-making ability
  • Edginess
  • Loss of enjoyment and job satisfaction
  • Reduced ability to care for patients
  • Inability to stop thinking about patients
  • Overwhelm; feeling a lack of control
  • Irritability
  • Reduced empathy
  • Anger
  • Disconnection
  • Depression
  • Substance abuse

 People with compassion fatigue can’t relax even when they’re off the clock. They often dwell on patients’ stories and situations, which makes secondary trauma worse.

 Ways to Address Compassion Fatigue

 Healthcare workers give so much to their patients, but it’s important to remember that you can only neglect your own needs for so long before you’re unable to care for others. To prevent and address compassion fatigue, self-care steps need to be a priority, including the following:

 Physical Activity & Diet

 Although healthcare workers are on their feet for long hours, this isn’t the kind of physical activity that can help stabilize mood and promote good health. Making time for regular exercise during free time is important for overall well-being.

 Eating well is also important. Many healthcare workers end up snacking on junk food, which can lead to a host of health problems. Packing healthier snacks and eating nutritious meals are necessary for mental and physical health.

 Relaxation & Rest

 Sleep is incredibly important for everyone, especially those at risk for compassion fatigue. Making time to relax and rest is key to preventing stress from spiraling out of control. Rest improves focus, reduces stress, and makes people better able to cope with their responsibilities at work.

 Healthy Coping Mechanisms

 People who confront awful things daily need ways to cope. Unfortunately, many of these coping mechanisms are unhealthy. Substance abuse is common among those experiencing compassion fatigue.

 Finding healthier coping mechanisms is important. Breathing exercises, muscle relaxation techniques, meditation, yoga, and journaling are all good ways to cope with the stress of secondhand trauma. Some people also find that spiritual practices help them feel prepared to go back to work ready to help others.

 Support From Friends, Colleagues & Professionals

 Social support is key, as compassion fatigue can be very isolating. It’s important for healthcare professionals to lean on each other and to keep up their social ties. Being able to laugh with colleagues and relax with friends can make a huge difference and help prevent or improve compassion fatigue.

 For those who need additional support, working with a mental health professional can be a good choice. They can help people who are struggling to develop strategies for dealing with compassion fatigue.

 Finding Your Passion to Make a Difference

 Although compassion fatigue is a hazard of working in healthcare, many people wouldn’t dream of any other career. Without compassionate people who want nothing more than to make the world a better place by helping others, we would be in deep trouble.

 If healthcare is your calling and your passion, then you can make a difference! Just be sure to take care of yourself, too.

by Sarah Daren
With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

A Profession with a Bright Future: 5 Advantages to Being a Clinical Massage Therapist

Clinical massage therapists are becoming increasingly important in healthcare. Learn why this profession could be a great career option.

The demand for massage therapists is high and a big part of that has to do with the profession’s growing role in healthcare. Clinical massage therapists use massage techniques to help heal injuries, alleviate pain, and improve muscle function.

I’ve experienced the exciting transformation of the massage therapy profession firsthand, both as a practicing massage therapist and as a massage therapy instructor and program director.

Below, I’ll describe five advantages to being a clinical massage therapist.

1. Become a healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re interested in a healthcare career but are concerned about the time and expense it can take, massage therapy could be a great option for you.

Depending on the program you choose, it’s possible for you to obtain a certificate in therapeutic massage in a year or so. This can prepare you to work in healthcare settings such as hospitals, chiropractic offices, and integrative healthcare clinics, as well as your own massage therapy practice.

And with approximately another three to eight months of education, you can obtain an associate degree. This can open up additional opportunities for further education and professional advancement. (For more info, check out how to become a massage therapist.)

2. Choose a profession with a bright future

Although there are no guarantees when it comes to obtaining employment, you should know the current — and expected — demand for massage therapists is extremely high.

In fact, in my 18 years of experience, I can’t recall a more promising time to enter the massage therapy job market.

A great indicator of this is the Bureau of Labor Statistics job outlook from 2020 to 2030, which projects a 32% job growth rate. To help put that in perspective, that’s nearly four times the average growth rate for all jobs.

3. Enjoy a low-stress career helping improve people’s health

Clinical massage therapists do more than help people feel more relaxed. They can play a pivotal role in relieving certain types of pain, helping people rehabilitate from injuries and surgeries, and optimizing muscle functioning.

Having a career helping improve people’s health in ways like these can be incredibly rewarding.
Also, keep in mind that some healthcare settings can be hectic and stressful. But the good news here is that clinical massage therapists typically work in low-stress settings.

They also can enjoy the satisfaction of establishing a deeper connection with patients. Rather than move patients quickly through appointments, clinical massage therapists provide direct care through touch, sometimes for an hour or more.

4. Have the freedom to create your own career path

Compared to many other healthcare professions, clinical massage therapists have more freedom to create their own career path.

For example, opening your own massage therapy practice is a viable — and popular — option for massage therapists, which makes it easier to shape your own schedule.

But if having your own massage practice isn’t for you, that’s not a problem. Clinical massage therapists can find employment in a wide range of settings. Here are some examples:

Integrative care clinics
Chiropractic offices
Community clinics
Primary care clinics
Sports and rehabilitation clinics
Public and private hospitals
VA medical centers
Fitness centers
Sports team facilities

Clinical massage therapists can also specialize in working with specific types of patients. Veterans, children, seniors, athletes, expectant mothers, cancer patients, hospice patients — these are just some of the many possibilities.

5. Be on the front lines of exciting changes in healthcare

As a clinical massage therapist, you can become part of an exciting new era in healthcare. I’m talking specifically about integrative healthcare, a patient-centered, team-based approach involving practitioners from various fields working together to help patients.

Increasingly, clinical massage therapists are part of a healthcare team — in some cases working alongside — healthcare professionals like chiropractors, acupuncturists, physical therapists, medical doctors, nurses, and more.

In the process, clinical massage therapists are also helping to meet the growing demand for drug-free, noninvasive alternatives to pain medications such as opioids.

Take the next step and start exploring programs

You’ve just gotten a glimpse of a growing healthcare profession in high demand, one where you can become a professional in a shorter amount of time, shape your own career more easily, and enjoy a low-stress environment helping others become healthier.

Could becoming a clinical massage therapist be right for you? To learn more, start researching massage therapy programs today.


Spring Saldana is board-certified in therapeutic massage and bodywork, the highest credential within the massage and bodywork profession. She is also the Program Chair of the Massage Therapy Programs at Northwestern Health Sciences University.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapy’s Most In-Demand Roles

Despite being majorly impacted by the pandemic, healthcare employment is rebounding at a steady clip. What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now, and where?

As the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in April of 2020, despite being, arguably, the most needed and relevant industry, healthcare accounted for approximately 6.8% of the more than 20 million jobs lost in the U.S. during that time.

Fast forward to present day, and healthcare is rebounding at a steady clip. Despite the current overall unemployment rate being 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare has dropped to only 3.1%. Healthcare has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when it added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

1. Speech-Language Pathologist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 30%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida
View All SLP Jobs →

2. Physical Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 22.2%
Most Needed In: California, Florida, Texas, Georgia, and New York
View All PT Jobs →

3. Occupational Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 18.4%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, Florida, and New York
View All OT Jobs →

4. Respiratory Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 16.1%
Most Needed In: Ohio, Texas, Florida, Michigan, and Georgia
View All RT Jobs →

5. Physical Therapist Assistant

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 7.3%
Most Needed In: California, New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Connecticut
View All PTA Jobs →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

3 States with the Most Demand for Therapy Professionals

Given the pandemic, therapy professionals are essential in a way that most other professions are not at the moment. Where is demand the greatest?

The healthcare workforce, like nearly every other industry, was greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, seeing staggering job losses as the virus, and the economic fallout associated with it, swept across the nation. However, therapy professionals are essential in a way that most other professions are not at the moment, and hiring remains steady, with the healthcare industry adding back more than 250,000 jobs during July, August, and September.

Where is the demand for physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists the greatest, though? We analyzed data from our jobs website to determine what states currently have the highest inventory of openings. Here are the top three states where PTs, OTs, and RTs are needed most.

States with the Most Demand for Physical Therapists

1. California

Average Annual Physical Therapist Salary in California: $99,920

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Physical Therapist Jobs in California →

2. Texas

Average Annual Physical Therapist Salary in Texas: $89,630

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Physical Therapist Jobs in Texas →

3. Virginia

Average Annual Physical Therapist Salary in Virginia: $91,930

Noteworthy Openings in Virginia:

Click Here to Search Physical Therapist Jobs in Virginia →

States with the Most Demand for Occupational Therapists

1. California

Average Annual Occupational Therapist Salary in California: $98,450

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Occupational Therapist Jobs in California →

2. Texas

Average Annual Occupational Therapist Salary in Texas: $85,090

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Occupational Therapist Jobs in Texas →

3. Illinois

Average Annual Occupational Therapist Salary in Illinois: $84,700

Noteworthy Openings in Illinois:

Click Here to Search Occupational Therapist Jobs in Illinois →

States with the Most Demand for Respiratory Therapists

1. California

Average Annual Respiratory Therapist Salary in California: $83,920

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Respiratory Therapist Jobs in California →

2. Colorado

Average Annual Respiratory Therapist Salary in Colorado: $64,450

Noteworthy Openings in Colorado:

Click Here to Search Respiratory Therapist Jobs in Colorado →

3. Texas

Average Annual Respiratory Therapist Salary in Texas: $60,560

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Respiratory Therapist Jobs in Texas →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Kick off Your 2020 Job Search with These Awesome Therapy Jobs

If you’re a PT, OT, or SLP who made a resolution to find a new job in 2020, this list of openings is a fantastic place to start your search.

The ball has dropped and 2020 is here and, if you are like many others, the new year brings with it the resolution to find a new job. Perhaps you have stagnated in your current role, or you are seeking a position with higher pay or a more flexible schedule, or maybe this is the year you want to really mix things up and dive into travel assignments. Whatever the reason you are pursuing a change, we are behind you. Ready your résumé and take a look at some of the excellent opportunities available on our site to start your 2020 job search strong.

Physical Therapy Openings:

View All PT Openings →

Occupational Therapy Openings:

View All OT Openings →

Speech Language Pathology Openings:

View All SLP Openings →

Don’t see your dream job? Click here to see all available jobs on our site.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Your Therapy Practice’s Online Reputation Matters

Is your practice a 5-star facility according to Google, Yelp, Facebook, and so on? If not, here are some ways to help improve your online reputation.

Have you Googled your practice lately? Logged in to Yelp? Dropped in on your Facebook page? You might want to.

Your practice’s online reputation matters now more than ever before. Increasingly, patients are putting their trust in online reviews when determining which healthcare facility and provider to use. In fact, the results of a recent survey by the Binary Fountain found 70% of Americans have been influenced by online ratings and review when selecting a healthcare provider, and 95% of respondents said they find online ratings and reviews “somewhat” to “very” reliable. In addition, according to BrightLocal’s most recent Local Consumer Review Survey, 91% of 18-34 year old consumers trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.

If your practice is anything less than a 5-star facility online, here are some ways to help improve your reputation.

Build and Own Your Brand: The more of a presence you have online, the more you can control perceptions of your practice. If you haven’t already, build an SEO-optimized website to make your practice easier to find online, and secure accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Yelp, YouTube, and so on. Include positive reviews or patient testimonials on your site, and be sure to interact with your patients and the public across social media on a regular basis to show you are a trusted, responsive brand. As the adage goes, the best defense is a good offense, and controlling your brand is a good way to control the conversation about your practice.

Ask for Reviews: We’re more connected than ever. According to Pew Research Center, 81% of Americans now own smartphones, meaning the internet is literally at their fingertips. While you have your patient in front of you, mention online ratings and ask if they’d be willing to write a review. They can even do so right there in the office, while sitting for an ice application or ESTIM. According to recent findings, 70% of consumers will leave a review for a business if asked, so it certainly does not hurt to mention it.

Use the Feedback: Negative reviews happen. Instead of letting them get under your skin, use them to your advantage. Publicly address any concerns made in reviews by responding in a professional manner and commit to improving on any issues you can, giving the public eye a candid look at how seriously you take patient satisfaction. While this won’t get rid of a negative review, it certainly allows people to see it, and your practice, in a different light.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

States with the Most Therapy Jobs

California appears to be the state with the highest demand across all therapy professions. What other states are seeing strong demand for PTs, OTs, and SLPs?

California appears to be the state with the highest demand across all therapy professions, having the most openings in Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech-Language Pathology. What other states are seeing strong demand for therapists? We analyzed data on our site and came up with the three states with the most available openings for PTs, OTs, and SLPs right now, as well as a selection of noteworthy openings for each position type.

Physical Therapy

1. California

Number of PT Jobs Available in California: 879

Average Annual PT Salary in California: $97,610

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search PT Jobs in California

2. Virginia

Number of PT Jobs Available in Virginia: 222

Average Annual PT Salary in Virginia: $90,960

Noteworthy Openings in Virginia:

Click Here to Search PT Jobs in Virginia

3. New York

Number of PT Jobs Available in New York: 200

Average Annual PT Salary in New York: $85,100

Noteworthy Openings in New York:

Click Here to Search PT Jobs in New York

Occupational Therapy

1. California

Number of OT Jobs Available in California: 326

Average Annual OT Salary in California: $97,260

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search OT Jobs in California

2. Texas

Number of OT Jobs Available in Texas: 208

Average Annual OT Salary in Texas: $87,780

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search OT Jobs in Texas

3. Illinois

Number of OT Jobs Available in Illinois: 116

Average Annual OT Salary in Illinois: $84,820

Noteworthy Openings in Illinois:

Click Here to Search OT Jobs in Illinois

Speech-Language Pathology

1. California

Number of SLP Jobs Available in California: 497

Average Annual SLP Salary in California: $92,750

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search SLP Jobs in California

2. Texas

Number of SLP Jobs Available in Texas: 241

Average Annual SLP Salary in Texas: $71,940

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search SLP Jobs in Texas

3. Florida

Number of SLP Jobs Available in Florida: 176

Average Annual SLP Salary in Florida: $76,820

Noteworthy Openings in Florida:

Click Here to Search SLP Jobs in Florida

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

September Is Pain Awareness Month

The month of September has been designated as Pain Awareness Month to shine a light on the 100 million Americans who live with chronic pain.

Pain is invisible. It cannot be seen, touched, or measured. But it is still very real for the 100 million Americans whose lives are impacted by chronic pain on a daily basis.

Yet, chronic pain is often misunderstood and invalidated by the chronic pain patient’s family, friends, coworkers, and even their healthcare providers.

To help the public understand the debilitating impacts of chronic pain, September has been designated as Pain Awareness Month.

“The only way we can create change is if we start speaking up–to loved ones, coworkers, neighbors, clinicians, and even policymakers,” said Nicole Hemmenway, Interim CEO of U.S. Pain Foundation, in a statement about Pain Awareness Month released this week. “Pain is silent, but we don’t have to be.”

Physical Therapists are often on the front lines when it comes to treating this silent epidemic. Through exercise, manual therapy, education, and teamwork, the therapy community helps chronic pain patients improve their quality of life, in place of dangerous and highly-addictive medications, such as opioids.

This September, take the time to speak with your patients about their pain, even more than you usually would. Sometimes, being heard can make all the difference.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Rehab Your Therapy Résumé

Whether or not you are actively searching for a new therapy job, keeping your résumé current is always smart. Here are some tips to get yours in top shape.

Whether or not you are actively searching for a new therapy job—we have a lot of those, if you are, though—keeping your résumé current just in case is always a good idea. Here are some tips to make sure your therapy résumé is in top shape.

Start with the Basics

Just like your patients, you have to walk before you run. Start with a clean, modern layout that breaks your information into easily identifiable sections, so the hiring manager, recruiter, or other important person whose hands your résumé falls into can easy see your selling points—and this is about selling yourself.

Some great examples of templates we love can be found here, here, and here. Be sure to use clean, easy-to-read fonts (side note: it is never appropriate to use Comic Sans), and always save a copy of your résumé as a .PDF file to retain formatting.

Objective: Ditch the “Objective”

Since you are selling yourself, you need to identify your personal brand, and put that at the top of your résumé in a professional summary, instead of an outdated “objective”. Your objective is to get the job—that’s already clear.

Start with your personal brand statement—a good trick for this is: a few words describing your strengths + who you are + your experience + your unique expertise. For example: An empathetic, tech-savvy Doctor of Physical Therapy, who has served the pediatric population for five years, with a special focus on treating those with Autism spectrum disorder.

Follow your personal brand statement with a professional summary. Highlight your expertise level and education accomplishments, if they are impressive enough to include here—such as a high GPA or special honors, and use strong action words (pioneered, increased, managed, achieved, generated, conceptualized, collaborated, and so on) to further drive your value.

School Them On Your Schooling

Education is a big selling point for therapy professionals—and, obviously, for us, since we’re mentioning it again. Your education, continuing education, and other certifications are your core, and recruiters and hiring companies are interested in them. Any schooling and training you have completed and completed well should be placed in its own section, and, if formatting allows, placed above your clinical experience.

Focus on Your Accomplishments

Don’t just bullet point your responsibilities in your previous roles, focus on what you have accomplished—maybe even brag a little.

List your experience in reverse chronological order, meaning your most recent role at the top, and expand on the points you touched on in your professional summary. This is a good place to get in some keywords (which will help your résumé get through the automated process of screening candidates and into the hands of an actual human, mind you) and talk about populations you’ve treated, modalities you’ve used, EHR you’re familiar with, and so on.

You can even include volunteer experience here, if it bolsters your brand.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.