Therapists Among the Top 10 Highest Paid Healthcare Pros

Ask most people what the highest paying career in healthcare is and the most likely response will be physician. That’s the right response. Physicians have traditionally been the highest paid in the healthcare industry. But in the most recent MedPage Today list of top ten highest paying healthcare gigs, there are some surprises. For instance, the last two positions on that list go to therapists.

Physical therapists come in at number ten while radiation therapists take the number nine position. Both types of therapy are widely utilized throughout American healthcare to help patients dealing with a variety of health problems. If you were looking to get into healthcare but didn’t want to go the doctor or nurse route, therapy would certainly be an option.

Physical Therapists

Getting back to the MedPage Today list, physical therapists round out the top ten list with an average salary of $91,000 annually. Based on a standard 40-hour work week, physical therapists make about $44 per hour. That’s not bad.

Physical therapists help patients improve their overall health and quality of life by improving mobility, managing pain, and strengthening muscles, tendons, and ligaments. They treat patients suffering from chronic conditions and illnesses. They also help patients recover from injuries and surgeries.

Radiation Therapists

The radiation therapy career is not as well-known. Radiation therapists work alongside oncologists and other members of a patient’s healthcare team to treat cancer. It is the radiation therapist who operates radiation treatment equipment.

This is a highly skilled position that demands appropriate education and training. Radiation therapists work at hospitals or independent cancer treatment clinics, earning a salary of $94,000 annually. They make about $45 per hour based on a 40-hour work week.

If you are in one of these positions, none of this information is new. You are well acquainted with physical and radiation therapists. You also know that the demand for their services is never-ending. The question is this where will you find your next opportunity?

It Starts with the Search

Whether you are looking to change employers or get an extra gig, it all starts with the job search. As we say time and again, our organization can help you find what you are looking for. Healthjobsnationwide.com, presently, has 9k therapist jobs on the site.

Worth the Money

Physical and radiation therapists take the final two spots on the MedPage Today list of the top ten highest paid healthcare professions. They make good money, and they are worth every penny. The same goes for occupational therapists, speech therapists, and so forth.

The employers on our job board know the value of a highly skilled therapists. We know the value of quality jobs. We want to help. Check us out and see


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

8 Reasons for Pursuing a Radiation Therapist Career


By Jessica Donahue, R.T. (R) (T) (ARRT)

Radiation therapists play a critical role in cancer treatment by administering radiation to specific areas of a patient’s body. But more than that, they can enjoy an incredibly rewarding career in healthcare.

I’ve been in the radiation therapy community for more than 20 years and have had the privilege of teaching hundreds of students to become radiation therapists. I’m also chair of the Radiation Therapy Degree Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University. In the following, I’d like to share insights on why you should consider this profession.

1. Become a highly valued healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re concerned about the amount of education (and money) it can take to become a healthcare professional, radiation therapy could be an excellent career choice. 

In fact, BusinessInsider.com has radiation therapist on its list of the highest paying jobs not requiring a bachelor’s degree. (Also, U.S. News & World Report puts the profession on two of its Best Jobs lists.)

Depending on the education option you choose — and on your current education level — becoming a radiation therapist can take somewhere between one and four years. 

Here are four possible paths to becoming a radiation therapist:

  • If you’ve already graduated from an associate degree program in the related field of radiologic technology, you can complete a certificate program in radiation therapy in about a year.
  • If you already have a bachelor’s degree in any subject, you may be able to complete a certificate program in radiation therapy in about a year.
  • There are also bachelor degree programs specifically in radiation therapy, which will typically take at least four years to finish.

(See How to Become a Radiation Therapist for more information.)

2. Join a healthcare profession with a promising future

The need for radiation therapists won’t be disappearing anytime soon. For example, cancer risk generally goes up with age. And as the current Baby Boomer generation ages, there will likely be an increased demand for radiation therapists. 

Along with an aging population, this increased demand can also be attributed to improved cancer detection methods and evolving treatments that require a radiation therapist’s expertise.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a positive growth rate (6%) for the radiation therapist profession over the next decade.

3. Enjoy a great work schedule 

The typical work schedule for radiation therapists is an attractive feature of the profession. You usually work in healthcare facilities that operate during daytime hours, Monday through Friday. That also means you usually have weekends, evenings, and holidays off. 

This aspect of the profession makes it an especially good career choice for parents trying to accommodate the needs of their family.

Note that radiation therapists are often needed for full- and part-time positions as well as for traveling therapist positions.

4. Choose a professional path with lots of flexibility

Career flexibility is another appealing feature of this profession. Once you finish a radiation therapy program and take the steps to become registered as a radiation therapist, you’ve completed what the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) calls a “primary eligibility pathway.”

If you’d like, you can then expand your knowledge and credentials through the ARRT’s “postprimary pathways,” which allow you to gain additional certifications in medical imaging procedures like the following:

  • Bone densitometry
  • Computed tomography (CT)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Vascular sonography

And with more qualifications, you can become a more competitive job candidate, have more control over your career direction, and potentially earn more income. 

It’s also worth noting that a background in radiation therapy can also be a valuable foundation for pursuing options such as:

  • Medical device sales and training 
  • Healthcare management roles (which may require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree)
  • Other healthcare professions such as a physician assistant (which would require a professional degree)
  • Directly related professions such as a medical dosimetrist (which would require a professional degree)

6. Make a deeper connection with your patients

Depending on the treatment plan and the nature of the cancer, a patient typically receives radiation treatment five days a week for several weeks in a row. Because of this, radiation therapists are able to become much closer with patients compared to other healthcare professions, and even compared to other members of the cancer treatment team. 

The familiarity you can develop with patients involves more than just delivering treatment. You’re in a position to listen, show compassion, and offer emotional support. You’re often getting to know family members as well.

For many radiation therapists, the daily patient interaction is the single biggest reason why they love their work.

Then there’s the general rhythm of each day. You stay busy and focused with a steady stream of daily patients.

7. Be part of a multidisciplinary cancer treatment team

If you engage with individuals easily and enjoy the atmosphere of being part of a team, then you should definitely explore the field of radiation therapy. 

As a radiation therapist, you work with other team members, prepare patients for their treatments, practice safe protocols by working in pairs, and interact with additional department staff such as nurses, dosimetrists, nutritionists, and radiation oncologists.

Then, of course, there are the patients you have the privilege of helping every day.

8. Work with advanced technology in an environment that fits with your preferences

As a radiation therapist, you’ll be on the front lines of cancer treatment as you work daily with cutting-edge medical technology. And as that technology advances, it also creates opportunities for you to continually learn something new. 

In fact, you’ll have opportunities for life-long learning with continuing education courses through meetings, hands-on training, and directed readings provided through the American Society of Radiologic Technologists

Make the next move and start exploring programs

In a relatively short amount of time, you could be delivering potentially life-saving treatment and enjoying an extremely rewarding career. Could joining the profession of radiation therapy be right for you?  

If you’re intrigued by the information you’ve just read, I recommend that you take the next important step and start exploring radiation therapy programs today! 


Jessica Donahue, B.S. R.T. (R) (T) (ARRT) is an experienced radiation therapist and is also Program Chair for the Radiation Therapy Degree Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University. 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Modern Medical Jobs: Trading Gig Work for Steady Employment?

Medical jobs come in all shapes and sizes. There are private practice doctors and therapists and those employed by hospital groups, clinics, etc. Nurses can choose to work for an employer or freelance as a temporary/per diem provider. At times, the options may seem limitless. But what are the differences between gig work and steady employment?

MarketWatch contributor Kelly James wrote a fascinating piece in late July 2022 about his transition from freelance writing to corporate work. While his experience isn’t identical to healthcare workers who trade self-employment for medical jobs, there are some similarities worth examining.

To set this up, the equivalent of gig work in the medical field is contract work. Medical professionals fill temporary needs on contracts, either arranged on their own or through a temporary/per diem provider. They are self-employed in every sense of the word.

Self-Employment Freedom

In Kelly’s case, he first gave up a lucrative career as a lawyer to become a freelance writer. It was something he had dreamed about for a long time. Going the freelance route afforded him the freedom to be his own boss. He was able to make his own schedule, do something he loved to do, and earn a very good living. It seemed perfect.

Likewise, there is no shortage of doctors, nurses and therapists who have traded in traditional medical employment for the temporary/per diem lifestyle. As prn providers, they are able to take contracts that suit them. They can work when they want to and take time off when necessary. They can even combine work and travel.

The Downsides

In Kelly’s cases, there were downsides. He went back to the corporate world almost out of necessity. He decided that life circumstances required him to have a traditional job with a steady paycheck and medical insurance and was willing to give up being his own boss to get those two things.

Temporary/per diem providers are in a slightly different position. Demand for their services is so high that they rarely need to actively drum up new business. As for health insurance, it is still expensive. But a practitioner who chooses to work through a temporary/per diem agency might get health insurance included as part of the package.

Traditional Employment Stability

Kelly’s return to the corporate world was easy, at first. He enjoyed the routine and He enjoyed getting to know his coworkers and being able to collaborate with them. He certainly enjoyed the stability that comes with working for someone else.

Doctors, nurses, and therapists are no different. More than one locum has returned to traditional employment for the same reasons that drove Kelly back to the corporate world. Self-employment has its perks, but traditional medical jobs offer the kind of stability that doesn’t come with freelancing.

Controlled by Someone Else

On the downside, traditional employment brings with it the burden of being controlled by someone else. Kelly left his first corporate job due to a micromanager who controlled his day so tightly that he felt he couldn’t breathe. Healthcare executives and managers can be equally controlling.

Kelly also had to give up the freedom of making his own schedule and the satisfaction that comes from building a business of his own. Likewise, transitioning from temporary work to a traditional medical job pretty much eliminates work freedom.

Both gig work and traditional employment have their positives and negatives. For most people, traditional employment is the preferred option. But there are some who taste the freedom of self-employment and never look back. That is the way it is in every industry. Medical jobs are no exception.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Great Resignation Isn’t Sparing Healthcare

We have been hearing about the Great Resignation for about a year now. Just in case you’ve been living under a rock, the Great Resignation is a phenomenon that has seen millions of people leave their jobs since the start of the COVID pandemic. Some are leaving to find employment elsewhere within the same industry. Others are retiring early. Still others are looking for a complete change, looking for work in an entirely different field or starting a new business.

Unfortunately for healthcare, the Great Resignation isn’t sparing it. Just look at nurse practitioner jobs. They are as plentiful now as they have ever been. The same goes for nursing jobs, physician jobs, therapist jobs, and on and on. It is not clear where all the disaffected workers are going, but it is clear that healthcare facilities are now having to work harder than they ever have in the past to fill open positions.

Looking for Something New

It is not surprising that job boards would have a lot more open doctor, nurse, and nurse practitioner jobs since the start of the pandemic. Healthcare delivery was obviously at the forefront of the pandemic. It still is. A lot of healthcare professionals just had their fill in the troubled year that was 2020. Many have decided it is time for a change.

Out in Idaho, the Idaho Press recently published an article about a group of healthcare professionals who had gotten together to discuss life after healthcare. Some of them were in the position of transitioning to new careers while others had already made the switch. The group represented everyone from nurse practitioners to therapists.

It is interesting that these professionals wanted to share their stories, not to encourage other healthcare workers to abandoned ship, but to let them know that other things were out there should they decide to try something new. That’s really what all of this is about. Whether it is healthcare or some other industry, the Great Resignation is about switching gears.

Those Who Stay Behind

Virtually every industry is reeling from the fallout of the Great Resignation. Those who stay behind have their own choices to make. Do they stay, or do they go? In healthcare, employers are doing everything they can to make sure their people stay. They have every reason to do so.

It goes without saying that healthcare workers are in the driver’s seat right now. They have a lot of leverage to ask for changes. Healthcare facilities have little choice but to comply with every reasonable request. Otherwise, they stand to continue losing workers to the Great Resignation.

From nurse practitioner jobs to allied health jobs, things in healthcare are changing rapidly. That is one of the things the group in Idaho mentioned. Many of the healthcare professionals who have decided to move on say that the modern work environment is nothing like what they knew when they first got started. Again, this is understandable. Nothing remains unchanged forever.

The Opportunities Are There

Even as the Great Resignation continues, opportunities for employment abound. If you are looking for nurse practitioner jobs, you will find plenty here on our jobs board. The same goes for therapist jobs, physician jobs, etc. Take the time to look around and maybe post your resume. There are employers out there very much interested in speaking with you.

In the meantime, the healthcare sector will have to continue changing in order to adapt to the modern workforce. The old ways of doing things are not going to work any longer. The faster healthcare adapts, the faster it will right the employment ship and start moving forward again.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

That Moment You Realize the Doctor Is a Wannabe Rock Star

Search as many physician jobs as you want on our job board, and we’re betting you won’t find any that require musical skills. Musical ability has nothing to do with providing quality medical care. But that has not stopped a group of physicians in suburban Chicago from not only learning to play, but also using their musical talents to thank nurses and support staff.

 Imagine that moment the staff realized some of their doctors were wannabe rock stars. Imagine seeing a doctor you work closely with, day after day, doing his best Jimmy Buffet impression – just to make you smile. What recently happened at Central DuPage Hospital undoubtedly made a lot of people happy. The healthcare industry needs more of it.

 Plenty of Bad News

 We do not have to look far to find bad news in healthcare. There is plenty of it. From physician burnout to nurses leaving clinical work in droves, we could spend all day focusing on the problems. Those problems do need some attention, but they shouldn’t command all of our attention. There is more than enough good to focus on.

 Some of that good was tapped into by Northwestern Medicine’s Dr. Anthony F. Altimari, M.D. According to the Daily Harald, Altimari’s love of music goes beyond just the music itself. He finds it therapeutic. When the stresses of his profession start getting to him, he picks up his guitar and goes to town.

Altimari is apparently not alone. He has made it his mission to encourage colleagues at Central DuPage to do the same thing. Many of them have. So much so that a bunch of them got together and put on a concert for hospital staff. The concert was a way for them to show their appreciation for how hard nurses and support staff worked during the COVID pandemic.

 Doctors Are People Too

 Physician jobs are a dime a dozen. That being the case, it is easy for the rest of us to forget that doctors are people too. They have families to take care of. They have bills to pay, houses to maintain, and cars that need to go into the shop for work. They also have their dreams and ambitions outside of medicine.

 Some of the nursing staff at Central DuPage were probably shocked to discover that the doctors they work with are also wannabe rock stars. But why should that be so unusual? Music is universal. People love it wherever you go. Furthermore, far more people possess musical talent than actually use it to benefit others.

 Your surgeon may have the steadiest hands in the business. And if so, you probably appreciate that. But perhaps those same hands are capable of performing guitar licks that would rival anything Jimmy Hendrix produced. Then again, maybe your highly skilled surgeon couldn’t carry a note in a bucket. You just don’t know.

 The Good Side of Medicine

 If nothing else, nurses and support staff at Central DuPage recently got a break from their stressful jobs. They got to enjoy the good side of medicine brought to them by a group of rocker doctors who just happen to be very good on their instruments. What a sight that must have been for the staff.

 Are you currently on the hunt for good physician jobs? If so, remember that there is more to life than work. Do whatever job you eventually land to the best of your ability. But do not hesitate to pursue other interests as well. You might be able to use those interests to do something good for others.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Helping Healthcare Workers Combat Compassion Fatigue

The last few years have been extremely hard for healthcare workers. Doctors, nurses, and other healthcare personnel often struggle with long hours and stress, and the pandemic has only made things worse. The trauma of directly confronting the consequences of COVID-19 has caused many people to develop a stress and trauma-related phenomenon known as compassion fatigue.

 Compassion fatigue is a common problem among people who work in high-intensity, stressful jobs involving other people. This advanced form of burnout often leads to people leaving these critical fields for their own health and well-being. So, what can be done to help prevent or reverse compassion fatigue?

 What is Compassion Fatigue?

 Compassion fatigue occurs in people who have careers focusing on helping others in difficult situations. Healthcare workers, counselors, social workers, and other professionals are at the highest risk of developing compassion fatigue.

 Essentially, compassion fatigue occurs when people work long hours while working with people who are sick and dying, struggling with severe mental health issues, or are victims of violence and trauma. Confronting these tragedies on a daily basis takes its toll, leading to extreme exhaustion, burnout, and secondhand trauma.

 Everyone experiences work-related stress at some point during their careers. Many people also develop burnout from working under stressful conditions for too long without rest. However, compassion fatigue takes these problems to an even higher level, due to the nature of the jobs that cause it.

 Compassion fatigue should be taken very seriously. Burnout on its own is bad enough, but the secondary trauma caused by compassion fatigue is even more serious. In addition to causing a range of physical and mental symptoms in the short term, compassion fatigue can even lead to PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).

 Symptoms of Compassion Fatigue

 If you work in healthcare, it’s important to know how to spot the symptoms of compassion fatigue in yourself and others. Some of these symptoms affect one’s ability to work and care for patients, while others affect personal health and well-being. Signs and symptoms of compassion fatigue to watch out for include:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Reduced decision-making ability
  • Edginess
  • Loss of enjoyment and job satisfaction
  • Reduced ability to care for patients
  • Inability to stop thinking about patients
  • Overwhelm; feeling a lack of control
  • Irritability
  • Reduced empathy
  • Anger
  • Disconnection
  • Depression
  • Substance abuse

 People with compassion fatigue can’t relax even when they’re off the clock. They often dwell on patients’ stories and situations, which makes secondary trauma worse.

 Ways to Address Compassion Fatigue

 Healthcare workers give so much to their patients, but it’s important to remember that you can only neglect your own needs for so long before you’re unable to care for others. To prevent and address compassion fatigue, self-care steps need to be a priority, including the following:

 Physical Activity & Diet

 Although healthcare workers are on their feet for long hours, this isn’t the kind of physical activity that can help stabilize mood and promote good health. Making time for regular exercise during free time is important for overall well-being.

 Eating well is also important. Many healthcare workers end up snacking on junk food, which can lead to a host of health problems. Packing healthier snacks and eating nutritious meals are necessary for mental and physical health.

 Relaxation & Rest

 Sleep is incredibly important for everyone, especially those at risk for compassion fatigue. Making time to relax and rest is key to preventing stress from spiraling out of control. Rest improves focus, reduces stress, and makes people better able to cope with their responsibilities at work.

 Healthy Coping Mechanisms

 People who confront awful things daily need ways to cope. Unfortunately, many of these coping mechanisms are unhealthy. Substance abuse is common among those experiencing compassion fatigue.

 Finding healthier coping mechanisms is important. Breathing exercises, muscle relaxation techniques, meditation, yoga, and journaling are all good ways to cope with the stress of secondhand trauma. Some people also find that spiritual practices help them feel prepared to go back to work ready to help others.

 Support From Friends, Colleagues & Professionals

 Social support is key, as compassion fatigue can be very isolating. It’s important for healthcare professionals to lean on each other and to keep up their social ties. Being able to laugh with colleagues and relax with friends can make a huge difference and help prevent or improve compassion fatigue.

 For those who need additional support, working with a mental health professional can be a good choice. They can help people who are struggling to develop strategies for dealing with compassion fatigue.

 Finding Your Passion to Make a Difference

 Although compassion fatigue is a hazard of working in healthcare, many people wouldn’t dream of any other career. Without compassionate people who want nothing more than to make the world a better place by helping others, we would be in deep trouble.

 If healthcare is your calling and your passion, then you can make a difference! Just be sure to take care of yourself, too.

by Sarah Daren
With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

A Profession with a Bright Future: 5 Advantages to Being a Clinical Massage Therapist

Clinical massage therapists are becoming increasingly important in healthcare. Learn why this profession could be a great career option.

The demand for massage therapists is high and a big part of that has to do with the profession’s growing role in healthcare. Clinical massage therapists use massage techniques to help heal injuries, alleviate pain, and improve muscle function.

I’ve experienced the exciting transformation of the massage therapy profession firsthand, both as a practicing massage therapist and as a massage therapy instructor and program director.

Below, I’ll describe five advantages to being a clinical massage therapist.

1. Become a healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re interested in a healthcare career but are concerned about the time and expense it can take, massage therapy could be a great option for you.

Depending on the program you choose, it’s possible for you to obtain a certificate in therapeutic massage in a year or so. This can prepare you to work in healthcare settings such as hospitals, chiropractic offices, and integrative healthcare clinics, as well as your own massage therapy practice.

And with approximately another three to eight months of education, you can obtain an associate degree. This can open up additional opportunities for further education and professional advancement. (For more info, check out how to become a massage therapist.)

2. Choose a profession with a bright future

Although there are no guarantees when it comes to obtaining employment, you should know the current — and expected — demand for massage therapists is extremely high.

In fact, in my 18 years of experience, I can’t recall a more promising time to enter the massage therapy job market.

A great indicator of this is the Bureau of Labor Statistics job outlook from 2020 to 2030, which projects a 32% job growth rate. To help put that in perspective, that’s nearly four times the average growth rate for all jobs.

3. Enjoy a low-stress career helping improve people’s health

Clinical massage therapists do more than help people feel more relaxed. They can play a pivotal role in relieving certain types of pain, helping people rehabilitate from injuries and surgeries, and optimizing muscle functioning.

Having a career helping improve people’s health in ways like these can be incredibly rewarding.
Also, keep in mind that some healthcare settings can be hectic and stressful. But the good news here is that clinical massage therapists typically work in low-stress settings.

They also can enjoy the satisfaction of establishing a deeper connection with patients. Rather than move patients quickly through appointments, clinical massage therapists provide direct care through touch, sometimes for an hour or more.

4. Have the freedom to create your own career path

Compared to many other healthcare professions, clinical massage therapists have more freedom to create their own career path.

For example, opening your own massage therapy practice is a viable — and popular — option for massage therapists, which makes it easier to shape your own schedule.

But if having your own massage practice isn’t for you, that’s not a problem. Clinical massage therapists can find employment in a wide range of settings. Here are some examples:

Integrative care clinics
Chiropractic offices
Community clinics
Primary care clinics
Sports and rehabilitation clinics
Public and private hospitals
VA medical centers
Fitness centers
Sports team facilities

Clinical massage therapists can also specialize in working with specific types of patients. Veterans, children, seniors, athletes, expectant mothers, cancer patients, hospice patients — these are just some of the many possibilities.

5. Be on the front lines of exciting changes in healthcare

As a clinical massage therapist, you can become part of an exciting new era in healthcare. I’m talking specifically about integrative healthcare, a patient-centered, team-based approach involving practitioners from various fields working together to help patients.

Increasingly, clinical massage therapists are part of a healthcare team — in some cases working alongside — healthcare professionals like chiropractors, acupuncturists, physical therapists, medical doctors, nurses, and more.

In the process, clinical massage therapists are also helping to meet the growing demand for drug-free, noninvasive alternatives to pain medications such as opioids.

Take the next step and start exploring programs

You’ve just gotten a glimpse of a growing healthcare profession in high demand, one where you can become a professional in a shorter amount of time, shape your own career more easily, and enjoy a low-stress environment helping others become healthier.

Could becoming a clinical massage therapist be right for you? To learn more, start researching massage therapy programs today.


Spring Saldana is board-certified in therapeutic massage and bodywork, the highest credential within the massage and bodywork profession. She is also the Program Chair of the Massage Therapy Programs at Northwestern Health Sciences University.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapy’s Most In-Demand Roles

Despite being majorly impacted by the pandemic, healthcare employment is rebounding at a steady clip. What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now, and where?

As the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in April of 2020, despite being, arguably, the most needed and relevant industry, healthcare accounted for approximately 6.8% of the more than 20 million jobs lost in the U.S. during that time.

Fast forward to present day, and healthcare is rebounding at a steady clip. Despite the current overall unemployment rate being 5.8%, unemployment in healthcare has dropped to only 3.1%. Healthcare has consistently seen notable job gains over the last several months, including most recently when it added 23,000 jobs in May of 2021.

What types of therapy professionals are needed the most right now? And where are they needed? We break it down for you below, according to data from our jobs site.

1. Speech-Language Pathologist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 30%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida
View All SLP Jobs →

2. Physical Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 22.2%
Most Needed In: California, Florida, Texas, Georgia, and New York
View All PT Jobs →

3. Occupational Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 18.4%
Most Needed In: California, Texas, Illinois, Florida, and New York
View All OT Jobs →

4. Respiratory Therapist

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 16.1%
Most Needed In: Ohio, Texas, Florida, Michigan, and Georgia
View All RT Jobs →

5. Physical Therapist Assistant

Percentage of Available Therapy Jobs on Our Site: 7.3%
Most Needed In: California, New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Connecticut
View All PTA Jobs →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

3 States with the Most Demand for Therapy Professionals

Given the pandemic, therapy professionals are essential in a way that most other professions are not at the moment. Where is demand the greatest?

The healthcare workforce, like nearly every other industry, was greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, seeing staggering job losses as the virus, and the economic fallout associated with it, swept across the nation. However, therapy professionals are essential in a way that most other professions are not at the moment, and hiring remains steady, with the healthcare industry adding back more than 250,000 jobs during July, August, and September.

Where is the demand for physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists the greatest, though? We analyzed data from our jobs website to determine what states currently have the highest inventory of openings. Here are the top three states where PTs, OTs, and RTs are needed most.

States with the Most Demand for Physical Therapists

1. California

Average Annual Physical Therapist Salary in California: $99,920

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Physical Therapist Jobs in California →

2. Texas

Average Annual Physical Therapist Salary in Texas: $89,630

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Physical Therapist Jobs in Texas →

3. Virginia

Average Annual Physical Therapist Salary in Virginia: $91,930

Noteworthy Openings in Virginia:

Click Here to Search Physical Therapist Jobs in Virginia →

States with the Most Demand for Occupational Therapists

1. California

Average Annual Occupational Therapist Salary in California: $98,450

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Occupational Therapist Jobs in California →

2. Texas

Average Annual Occupational Therapist Salary in Texas: $85,090

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Occupational Therapist Jobs in Texas →

3. Illinois

Average Annual Occupational Therapist Salary in Illinois: $84,700

Noteworthy Openings in Illinois:

Click Here to Search Occupational Therapist Jobs in Illinois →

States with the Most Demand for Respiratory Therapists

1. California

Average Annual Respiratory Therapist Salary in California: $83,920

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Respiratory Therapist Jobs in California →

2. Colorado

Average Annual Respiratory Therapist Salary in Colorado: $64,450

Noteworthy Openings in Colorado:

Click Here to Search Respiratory Therapist Jobs in Colorado →

3. Texas

Average Annual Respiratory Therapist Salary in Texas: $60,560

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Respiratory Therapist Jobs in Texas →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Kick off Your 2020 Job Search with These Awesome Therapy Jobs

If you’re a PT, OT, or SLP who made a resolution to find a new job in 2020, this list of openings is a fantastic place to start your search.

The ball has dropped and 2020 is here and, if you are like many others, the new year brings with it the resolution to find a new job. Perhaps you have stagnated in your current role, or you are seeking a position with higher pay or a more flexible schedule, or maybe this is the year you want to really mix things up and dive into travel assignments. Whatever the reason you are pursuing a change, we are behind you. Ready your résumé and take a look at some of the excellent opportunities available on our site to start your 2020 job search strong.

Physical Therapy Openings:

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Occupational Therapy Openings:

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Speech Language Pathology Openings:

View All SLP Openings →

Don’t see your dream job? Click here to see all available jobs on our site.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.