The Growing Demand for Teletherapy: Exploring the Benefits and Challenges of Virtual Mental Health Services

The landscape of mental health support has undergone significant transformation over the years. Traditional in-person therapy, a longstanding pillar of psychological care, has witnessed a notable evolution with the advent of teletherapy. This digital medium has emerged as a response to the contemporary challenges posed by our fast-paced world, offering new avenues for delivering psychological assistance.

Recent statistics highlight the increasing preference for teletherapy, with its usage surging over the past decade, surpassing traditional in-person sessions. In 2020, Doctor On Demand, a telehealth provider, reported a 50% surge in new teletherapy patients within six weeks—a demand surpassing the peak of COVID-19-related anxiety in March and April.

Understanding Teletherapy: Mechanics and Evolution

Definition and Scope:

Teletherapy, also called online therapy, virtual therapy, or e-therapy, encompasses a range of therapeutic interventions delivered through digital communication channels. These channels primarily include video, audio, and text-based interactions, bridging the geographical gap between therapists and clients. 

In teletherapy, therapists and clients engage in therapeutic conversations and interventions via secure platforms and applications, eliminating the need for physical presence in a traditional therapy setting. This medium allows individuals to access mental health support from the comfort of their environments, addressing concerns such as accessibility, privacy, and convenience.

Modes of Teletherapy

Video-Based Teletherapy:

Video-based teletherapy involves real-time visual interactions between therapists and clients through video conferencing. This modality replicates face-to-face sessions, enabling therapists to read nonverbal cues and expressions. Pros include a closer semblance to traditional therapy and the ability to establish rapport, but potential drawbacks involve technical glitches, privacy concerns, and the requirement for a stable internet connection.

Phone-Based Teletherapy:

Phone-based teletherapy relies on audio conversations conducted over the phone. This mode offers accessibility and convenience, requiring only a working phone line. Clients might feel more comfortable sharing sensitive topics verbally, but limitations include the absence of visual cues and potential communication misinterpretations.

Text-Based Teletherapy:

Text-based teletherapy occurs through written exchanges, often using messaging platforms or email. This mode allows clients to articulate thoughts more thoughtfully and offers flexibility in scheduling. However, it lacks real-time interaction and nonverbal cues and may hinder the establishment of immediate rapport.

Benefits of Teletherapy: Expanding Horizons

The benefits of teletherapy contribute to a transformative shift in mental health care, offering flexibility, accessibility, and customization that traditional in-person therapy might struggle to achieve. As technology continues to evolve, the following advantages will further shape the landscape of mental health support and widen its reach.

Enhanced Accessibility and Convenience:

  • Transcending Geographical Barriers: Teletherapy eliminates the need for clients to be near their therapists. Individuals residing in remote or underserved areas gain access to mental health support that may have been previously inaccessible due to geographical constraints. This is particularly significant for those in rural regions or countries lacking mental health infrastructure.
  • Flexibility of Scheduling: Teletherapy accommodates various time zones and busy lifestyles. Clients and therapists can schedule sessions at times that suit both parties, promoting continuity of care. This flexibility is valuable for professionals, caregivers, or individuals with irregular schedules.

Anonymity and Stigma Reduction:

  • Open Discussion of Sensitive Topics: Virtual sessions foster a sense of anonymity, making it easier for clients to discuss sensitive or embarrassing topics. This reduced fear of judgment can lead to more honest and open conversations, enhancing the therapeutic process and outcomes.
  • Engagement for Marginalized Communities: Teletherapy can reduce the stigma of seeking mental health care within specific cultural or conservative contexts. Marginalized communities, where mental health issues might carry a solid social stigma, find a safe space to access support without the fear of being recognized or judged within their communities.

Broadening Therapist Selection and Expertise:

  • Global Pool of Therapists: Teletherapy transcends geographical boundaries, allowing clients to choose from a diverse global pool of therapists. This widens the options available for individuals seeking specific therapeutic approaches, cultural understandings, or languages that may not be prevalent in their local area.
  • Ease of Finding Specialized Help: Virtual platforms facilitate finding therapists with specialized expertise. Clients can easily search for professionals specializing in their concerns, such as trauma, LGBTQ+ issues, or specific therapeutic modalities. This tailored approach enhances the likelihood of receiving adequate treatment.

Challenges of Teletherapy: Navigating Complexities

Technology-Related Hurdles:

Teletherapy faces potential challenges rooted in technology. Disparities in internet connectivity can hinder access for individuals in remote areas or those with limited resources. The reliability of internet connections may impact session quality, causing disruptions and communication delays. 

Moreover, technical issues such as audio/video malfunctions or platform glitches can disrupt the therapy flow, potentially affecting the therapeutic alliance between the client and therapist. Overcoming these hurdles necessitates technological literacy and contingency plans to address unexpected disruptions.

Establishing Therapeutic Rapport:

Building a strong therapeutic rapport is essential in any therapy setting but presents unique challenges in the virtual realm. The absence of non-verbal cues, such as body language and facial expressions, can hinder therapists’ ability to gauge clients’ emotions and reactions accurately. 

Therapists must employ alternative strategies to establish trust, such as active listening, clarifying client feelings, and encouraging open communication. Developing these techniques helps compensate for the limitations of the digital medium, ensuring that the therapeutic connection remains robust and effective.

Ethical and Privacy Considerations:

Ethical and privacy concerns become more intricate in the online therapy landscape. Ensuring the security of client data and maintaining confidentiality is paramount, given the digital nature of the interactions. Therapists must employ encrypted communication platforms, conduct sessions in private settings, and educate clients on best practices for safeguarding their personal information. 

Additionally, therapists must navigate issues like establishing the identity of clients in virtual environments and addressing potential breaches of confidentiality due to technical vulnerabilities. Adhering to strict ethical guidelines and staying updated on the latest privacy regulations helps create a secure and trustworthy digital therapeutic space.

Efficacy and Clinical Considerations: Evidence and Adaptation

Comparative Effectiveness:

The efficacy of teletherapy versus traditional in-person therapy has been extensively studied. Research consistently shows that teletherapy is as effective as in-person therapy for various mental health conditions, including anxiety disorders, depression, trauma, and substance use disorders. Teletherapy excels in providing access to care for individuals who may face geographical or physical barriers, enhancing treatment engagement, and offering flexibility in scheduling. However, the efficacy might vary based on individual preferences, the severity of the condition, and the quality of the therapeutic relationship established through the virtual medium.

Adapting Therapeutic Approaches:

Therapists must adapt their approaches to optimize outcomes in the virtual environment. For instance, addressing rapport-building challenges can involve incorporating icebreakers, active listening techniques, and explicitly encouraging clients to share their emotions. Therapists can employ screen-sharing to visualize concepts, use digital tools for mindfulness exercises, and integrate video-based exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. 

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) can effectively translate into teletherapy, focusing on structured goal-setting and skill-building. Therapists must also pay special attention to screen fatigue and encourage clients to maintain healthy boundaries between therapy and personal life.

Innovative practices include integrating virtual reality technology for exposure therapy, utilizing AI-driven tools for mood tracking, and implementing asynchronous text-based interventions for ongoing support between sessions. The virtual setting offers opportunities for clients to practice skills in real-life contexts and receive immediate feedback, enhancing the therapeutic process. Nonetheless, therapists must remain attuned to clients’ responses and adjust interventions as needed, ensuring that the tailored approach effectively achieves desired therapeutic outcomes.

Future Implications and Innovations: Pathways Forward

As teletherapy continues to evolve, its integration with technology, expanded accessibility, and innovative approaches are set to redefine how mental health care is delivered and experienced. This transformation holds promise in addressing existing limitations and ensuring that quality mental health support is available to those who need it, regardless of their location or circumstances.

Integration into Mainstream Mental Health Care:

Teletherapy is poised to become a staple within mainstream mental health services. As society embraces digital interactions, teletherapy’s accessibility, convenience, and effectiveness will likely lead to its broader adoption. Mental health organizations and institutions are increasingly incorporating teletherapy into their offerings, expanding the reach of mental health support.

Regulatory frameworks are evolving to accommodate virtual services, further solidifying teletherapy’s place within the mental health landscape. This integration will complement traditional in-person therapy, providing clients various options that suit their preferences and needs.

Technological Advancements:

Cutting-edge technologies are shaping the future of teletherapy, promising even more engaging and effective interventions. Virtual reality (VR) applications can simulate real-world environments for exposure therapy, helping clients confront their fears within a controlled setting. AI-assisted tools can analyze client data to provide personalized insights and suggest tailored interventions, enhancing therapist-client collaboration. Predictive analytics might help identify potential relapses or deteriorations, allowing for timely interventions. These innovations can improve therapeutic outcomes by offering more immersive, data-driven, individualized treatment experiences.

Improved Accessibility and Affordability:

Teletherapy can potentially address current accessibility and affordability challenges within mental health care. By eliminating geographical constraints, individuals in underserved or rural areas can access specialized therapists and interventions. Reduced overhead costs associated with physical facilities can lead to cost savings, translating to more affordable client services. Teletherapy’s flexibility also means clients can engage in therapy without taking extended time off work or navigating transportation hurdles. These factors combined can contribute to democratizing mental health care, making it more accessible to a broader range of individuals.

Final Thoughts

Teletherapy has emerged as a transformative force in mental health care, offering a range of advantages that address diverse needs. Its ability to transcend geographical barriers, reduce stigma, and broaden therapist selection has democratized access to support. However, persistent challenges such as technological hurdles, rapport-building complexities, and ethical considerations underscore the need for ongoing efforts to refine this evolving approach.

As mental health professionals navigate the complexities of virtual interactions, it is essential to recognize the potential of teletherapy as a complementary tool rather than a replacement for traditional therapy. Incorporating teletherapy into practice can expand options for clients while maintaining the highest standards of care. To achieve this, sustained research and innovation are paramount. We must continue to explore the effectiveness of teletherapy across various conditions, refine therapeutic techniques, and harness emerging technologies for optimized outcomes.

 


Shauna Larson, a passionate mental wellness advocate. For the last five years, she employs her personal experience and deep understanding of mental health to illuminate the complexities and challenges that many face every day. Her thoughtful insights and relatable narratives have been featured in a variety of publications, cultivating a loyal readership that values her authentic voice and practical advice.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Patient Accommodations Within Therapy Practices

Building a successful therapy practice is easier when you put your patients first. Quality customer service, treatment, and resources are the key to attracting new patients and keeping them long-term.

More importantly, satisfying as many of your patients’ needs as possible is critical for a flourishing practice. Make these six accommodations for your patients, and you’ll likely see a rise in retention and satisfaction.

Accept Various Forms of Payment

One of the most significant challenges for patients pursuing therapy is paying for it. Many therapists’ rates are high, taking therapy completely off the table for some people. A lot of patients don’t have insurance, either.

To accommodate budgets and those that don’t have insurance, offer a variety of therapy payment methods.

For example, you could set a reasonable rate for your services and offer private pay options like cash, check, credit card, Venmo, or Paypal. You could allow patients to set up payment plans using a sliding fee system or a “pay what you can” method. Promotional discounts for new patients, HealthShare, and membership plans are also good options.

Accommodate patients of all financial backgrounds by accepting various payment forms.

Adhere to Digital Accessibility Standards

Many of your patients will interact with your practice online through your website. You can count on them having varying levels of technological and digital literacy. This makes adhering to digital accessibility standards that much more important.

All types of users must be able to use your website with ease. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 offers the latest standards for web content accessibility. Begin with a refresher on the four principles of accessibility. Then, move on to the guidelines for making your website content more accessible.

Ultimately, your site should be simple to navigate, understand, and use, no matter someone’s ability, background, or experience. Enlist the help of a web developer or accessibility specialist if you need to.

Offer Flexible Scheduling

Unfortunately, not everyone has the option to attend therapy between the hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Many patients work during these hours just as you do. Others work overnight and sleep during the day. Some have family obligations that don’t allow a therapy session in between.

There are a whole lot of reasons people need flexible time slots for their appointments. You don’t have to have therapy sessions at midnight. However, it’s a good idea to be as flexible as you can be with scheduling.

Choose a couple of days during the week when you offer late-night sessions. Do the same for early-morning sessions, or offer different hours of operation each day.

Consider customizing therapy schedules for patients as well. For example, if a patient needs one session a month during their overnight work shift, accommodate this if you’re comfortable with it. Or, if a patient needs to come on a Sunday, open up the office for them.

Flexible scheduling is especially helpful in accommodating more patient needs.

Prioritize Accessibility for Disabled Patients

Accessibility isn’t just for the digital realm. Many of your patients are living with a physical, developmental, behavioral, emotional, or sensory disability. You must ensure your practice and services are accessible to these individuals.

Understanding common disabilities and how to accommodate the needs of people living with them is a great first step. Even better is understanding the specific disabilities your patients are living with and accommodating them.

For example, if one of your patients uses a wheelchair, ensure your practice has a ramp and is wheelchair accessible inside. If a patient is visually impaired, offer braille and large-print materials. If a patient is deaf, have a sign language specialist on call for their appointments.

Learn how to accommodate individuals living with various disabilities so that your practice is accessible to more people.

Enable Telehealth Appointments

Therapy used to be primarily an in-person service. You’d go to a therapist’s office, have your session, and head home. Now, therapists can work with patients regardless of their location thanks to telehealth services.

You can offer telehealth appointments to patients who can’t get to your office because of a mobility issue, mental health challenge, childcare obligation, or another reason.

Use video conferencing software like Zoom to simplify virtual therapy sessions. All you have to do is set up the meeting and send your patient the link. You both use the link to enter the remote session and then you can begin therapy.

Make sure that any information you talk about or send through this virtual therapy session is protected.

Allow Patients To Bring a Support Person

Sometimes, people aren’t comfortable going to therapy by themselves, especially if they’re just starting their journey. Allowing a support person in the room during sessions can accommodate individuals with this concern.

You’ll need to get written consent from the patient that it’s okay for the support person to be there. You’ll also need the support person to sign something stating they won’t share anything from any session with anyone.

Of course, there will be sessions the support person can’t or shouldn’t come to. Just do your best to prepare your patients who use support persons for those sessions ahead of time.

Moving Forward

Accommodating as many of your patients’ needs as you can is one of the best ways to enhance your therapy practice. It’s one of the best ways to elevate the patient experience too. Consider the six accommodations above to attract more patients, satisfy, and keep them.


 Katie Brenneman is a passionate writer specializing in lifestyle, mental health, activism-related content. When she isn’t writing, you can find her with her nose buried in a book or hiking with her dog, Charlie. To connect with Katie, you can follow her on Twitter. 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

4 Ways to Enhance Your Therapy Practice

As a therapist, whether you’re new to the profession or have been practicing for years, staying up-to-date with the latest trends and resources in your field can help you make sure your practice is as successful as possible. In this article, also published on healthjobsnationwide.com, are four tips to enhance your therapy practice and ensure it runs smoothly.

Utilize Technology

Technology is becoming increasingly important in therapy practices for communication and record-keeping. Investing in a secure online platform lets you communicate directly with clients without having to worry about security issues while also allowing clients to book appointments online. Additionally, using digital records rather than paper helps you keep track of notes more easily. Plenty of tools allow you to do this, so be sure to look into what works best for you and your practice.

Network with Other Therapists

Networking with other therapists is a great way to stay up-to-date on the latest trends and resources available in the field of therapy. You can join professional groups or organizations that offer opportunities for networking with others who share your interests and goals, as well as attending conferences or workshops where like-minded professionals come together to discuss their work. This will give you a chance to learn about new ideas, techniques, and strategies that could help enhance your practice even further.

Implement New Services

If you’re looking for ways to increase revenue or attract more clients, consider implementing new services into your practice. This could be group sessions or specialized programs tailored toward specific client needs or demographics. For example, having your therapists get EMDR instruction can offer incredibly beneficial services to your clients and help attract new ones. Offering additional services allows you to expand your offerings and incentivizes potential clients to choose your practice over another one when they need counseling services.

Market Your Practice Online

Marketing is essential if you want people to know about your services so they can make informed decisions when choosing a therapist. Building an online presence through platforms such as social media allows potential clients to learn more about what services you offer and why they should choose your practice over another one. Additionally, taking advantage of SEO tactics can help ensure that any potential clients searching online will be able to find information about your practice quickly and easily too.

 

With these four tips in mind, enhancing your therapy practice doesn’t have to be difficult; by utilizing technology effectively, networking with other therapists, implementing new services, and marketing yourself online – all of which are outlined above –you can ensure that yours stands out from the crowd. Doing so will benefit current customers and attract potential ones, allowing your business to reach new heights of success.


Bio: Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber; https://www.facebook.com/people/Rachelle-Wilber/100009221637700/


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

 

What to Know Before Switching to a Telehealth Career

Telehealth has seen consistent growth in popularity over the last few years. But, the biggest “boom” came during the COVID-19 pandemic. At first, it was out of necessity as medical professionals worked to keep patients safe and protected. However, even as we enter a post-pandemic world, telehealth trends continue to go up.

Telehealth benefits both patients and physicians. It offers flexibility, greater inclusivity, and can encourage more people to practice preventative healthcare when they know they can chat with their doctor from the comfort of home.

If you’re considering a career in telehealth, now is a great time to get on board. However, it’s important to know what to expect, and how you can prepare yourself before you decide if it’s the right career move for you.

Consider What You Want

A career in telehealth can be rewarding. Depending on your position, you might interact directly with patients, offering medical advice and preventative care options that can improve their well-being or help them manage the symptoms of an illness. If you have a passion for helping people and want to do something truly meaningful, it’s a fantastic way to find fulfillment.

However, there are some potential drawbacks to consider. It’s not always the same having to help someone virtually, rather than face-to-face. You’ll also have to deal with people from all walks of life, and not every patient will be pleasant. Some will have conditions that are difficult to handle. Others might be frustrated by the very technology they’re using to talk to you. So, while a career in telehealth can be convenient, really consider what you want before you take the plunge. Think about things like:

      • Your comfort level in working with people virtually
      • How much time you can devote to this career
      • How well you handle stressful situations

Once you’ve decided that you think this career choice would be a good fit for you, it’s time to determine what you need to actually make it happen. If you’re currently in the healthcare field, it might be easy to transfer your education

Do You Meet the Qualifications?

Maybe you’re totally new to the telehealth field but you have the desire to help people. You don’t need to be a doctor or specialist to work in telehealth. However, depending on your position, you might need to meet certain qualifications. That includes certifications and licenses, in some cases.

For example, if you’re a nurse, you’ll have to receive appropriate licensing through the Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC). Because telehealth services are in such high demand, you shouldn’t have a problem getting your licensure quickly so you can start helping people as soon as possible.

If you’re a doctor, or specialist, or work for a clinic that provides telehealth services, make sure your certifications are up-to-date, and familiarize yourself with the latest in telemedicine software. There are multiple platforms and options available, so educating yourself on how to utilize technology safely and effectively is essential for any type of telehealth career.

Some practices and clinics might eventually switch to mostly telehealth services, so you might be able to get your foot in the door as an administrator and help people make virtual appointments or assist with billing. Having experience as an administrator can make that transition easier for you. You’ll also need to brush up on skills like:

      • Patience
      • Empathy
      • Time management
      • Organization
      • Flexibility

If you truly want to determine what’s needed to start your career with the right qualifications, check the requirements in your state. They vary by location, and you could be closer to getting started than you might think!

The Ins and Outs of a Virtual Career

One of the most important things to consider if you want to switch to a telehealth career is whether virtual/remote work is a good fit for you. There are advantages and disadvantages to think about. While virtual work can offer more flexibility, it can also take a toll on your mental health if you’re not getting the social interaction you need.

Humans are social creatures. We need face-to-face interaction. If your work solely relies on a virtual environment, you might struggle with isolation and loneliness. You might even feel uninspired, unmotivated, and burnt out.

While mental health stigmas in the healthcare field are starting to crumble, be sure you’re comfortable prioritizing your own mental well-being, and even talking to a professional if you’re worried that you might struggle with this type of career. Practice self-care each day by exercising, eating healthy meals, and getting as much in-person interaction with people as possible.

Telehealth is the future. While it can’t completely replace all types of medical care, it will certainly change the face of medicine and how people approach preventative care for years to come. If you’re interested in making a career change to enjoy the benefits of telemedicine, use the information here to consider whether it’s the right move, and whether you’ll find happiness and fulfillment. If so, don’t hesitate to start moving forward with your new career right away. The need for workers is extremely high, and you could end up landing the job of your dreams quickly.


Katie Brenneman is a passionate writer specializing in lifestyle, mental health, activism-related content. When she isn’t writing, you can find her with her nose buried in a book or hiking with her dog, Charlie. To connect with Katie, you can follow her on Twitter. 

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How Can We Improve Healthcare in Underserved Communities?

Today’s healthcare landscape is vast and complex. Within it exists nearly infinite sub-environments and social contexts, all of which present unique strengths, weaknesses, and difficulties. However, one sweeping reality that affects countless people within the system is a common tendency towards inequitable care provision for certain communities and demographics over others.

The disproportionalities in healthcare provision experienced by specific subpopulations and underserved communities is a story that repeats itself over and over across the country (and around the world). This is a matter of deep concern for equity advocates in healthcare, and there are a number of voices within the healthcare landscape working towards changing this reality.

Current Disparities in Healthcare Access

One helpful lens for understanding healthcare disparities at scale is a set of statistics that reveal the average difference in care delivery and outcomes by demographic. These include social differentiators like income level, race, legal status, gender identity, disability, and religion.

Across a range of metrics, certain communities, like those that earn middle-class incomes or are white/Caucasian, receive (on average) better levels of care and enjoy easier access to healthcare providers than individuals within the same communities and geographic locations that fall into other demographic categories.

There are a number of ways these disparities play out in various settings or instances. A few trends in particular represent a large percentage of healthcare inequity cases across the country. These include the following:

Difficulties in Securing Health Insurance for Noncitizens

Because the American healthcare system is so tightly tied to the insurance industry, it is vastly difficult to obtain any kind of healthcare without some form of health insurance. Unfortunately, insurance is very difficult to secure for a number of demographics, including those with complicated legal statuses or those that don’t work or have permanent addresses.

Racist Policies, Sentiments, and Biases Within the Healthcare System

This is a hugely complex topic and involves deeply systemic and cultural influences. The result, however, is a serially prejudiced system that, on average, is more likely to provide subpar care and treatment to people of color than it is to white people.

Healthcare Professionals, Especially in Places of Leadership, Remain Disproportionately white, Cisgendered, and Male

Though this has long been an area of focus and attempted awareness within the professional healthcare community, it still remains disproportionately monotone. Numbers of ethnic minorities (and other minority groups) working in healthcare fields remain stubbornly low.

This perpetuates difficulties that many patients experience when receiving care from someone who does not look like them and does not fully understand their culture, experience, community, or context.

Current Initiatives that are Working to Equalize Access to Good Healthcare

Above are just some of the ways that the healthcare system is still operating to disproportionately help certain members of society more than others. But though the system is still fraught with these widespread inequalities and problems, strides are being taken towards balancing the healthcare system at large and changing some of these realities so that more people have adequate access to the healthcare they need.

Changing Legislation to Correct Implicitly Biased or Prejudiced Policies

Systemic manifestations of discrimination and racism are often baked into legislative policy. The process of assessing current legislation and reshaping it to be more equal and equitable is a long, painstaking process. However, it can be a source of deep and significant institutional change.

Design Initiatives to Encourage More Members of Minority Groups to Study Medicine

These might look like demographic-specific scholarships, programs, or job fairs; or curriculums implemented in high-minority primary and secondary education spaces. Encouraging minority groups to consider healthcare a viable career option can have ripple effects on not only current but future generations and create precedent for more individuals to choose to enter the healthcare workforce as well.

Prioritizing Public Health Campaigns that Equip and Empower Minority Demographics to Partake in Healthy Living

Statistics reveal strong disparities in health IQ and healthy living habits between, for example, white/caucasian populations and ethnic minority populations. The work of providing diverse cultural contexts and backgrounds with health information made pertinent and relevant to them is slowly gaining traction and needs to be increased.

Ways to Contribute Personally Towards Stronger Equity in Healthcare

If you are a healthcare professional and want to make a difference in bringing about better, more equitable healthcare provision for all communities, here are a few ways you can get involved in this process.

Educate Yourself on the Nuances of Providing Healthcare to Those of Different Cultures, Identities, and Ethnicities

Whether you yourself belong to a minority identity or not, everyone has room to learn and grow when it comes to becoming more culturally knowledgeable and equipped. Terms like “transcultural nursing” and “cultural sensitivity” help shape this concept into actionable knowledge areas.

Seeking out conferences, talks, reading materials, and training on these topics can help you better understand, identify with, empathize with, and respect people with different cultural or ethnic backgrounds than your own.

Advocate for Equitable Policies, Awareness, and Conduct Within Your Own Healthcare Facility

Whether you work for an independent local hospital, a large nationwide healthcare provider, or a small outpatient clinic, your healthcare environment may or may not have an adequate understanding of equitable practices and policies.

Speaking up for underserved communities and supporting implementation of better equity practices can help change the nature of your healthcare facility as well as educate your colleagues and fellow professionals about the importance of healthcare equity.

Find Opportunities to Volunteer Your Healthcare Expertise to Support Underserved Communities in Your Area

Especially in locations where disparities are large and certain demographics or populations have poor access to healthcare, find opportunities to volunteer with nonprofit organizations or other initiatives to meet the healthcare needs of communities that have the most difficulty accessing treatment. This can be a significant and often life-altering way of lessening healthcare inequality.


With a Bachelor’s in Health Science along with an MBA, Sarah Daren has a wealth of knowledge within both the health and business sectors. Her expertise in scaling and identifying ways tech can improve the lives of others has led Sarah to be a consultant for a number of startup businesses, most prominently in the wellness industry, wearable technology and health education. She implements her health knowledge into every aspect of her life with a focus on making America a healthier and safer place for future generations to come.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

6 Tips for Launching a Medical Startup

The competition in the medical industry is fierce. Complex health care relationships, stringent legal regulations, and high-security standards can hamper new product launches. Here are six tips for kicking off a medical startup.

1. Elevate Your Skill Set

Don’t expect to become an overnight success in the healthcare industry. Your products or services must be of the highest quality and in high demand to succeed in the medical industry. Enrolling in a professional development program to learn marketable abilities may be worthwhile.

Assuming you want to start a medical coding company, you may benefit from an online professional development coursein the industry. It can prepare you to mark medical procedures and service claims with the correct codes. You’ll also be able to show off your knowledge on a final test.

2. Understand the Conservative Market

In terms of funding and growth, medical technology is one of the most promising fields. In 2020, health care costs in the United States reached $4.1 trillion, or $12,530 per person, an increase of about 10% from 2019. Research by the 2020 Commonwealth Fund estimates that health care consumes 16.9% of national income. Thus, it has the highest health care costs and the highest patient demand in the world.

3. Choose Your Business Structure

In the United States, it’s mandatory for any business, including those in the healthcare industry, to form a separate legal organization. You’ll have to select a business structure before registering your company.

A limited liability company (LLC) offers the most benefits for startups. It shields you from responsibility for the company’s debts and lawsuits, keeping your wealth safe. In addition, the LLC is subject to pass-through taxation. This means that its members, not the business, are responsible for reporting the business’s tax obligations on their tax returns. If you’re wondering how to start an LLC, research your state’s LLC requirements, then save money on attorney’s fees by completing the forms yourself or hiring a formation service to assist you.

4. Comply With HIPAA

Any medical startup with a health care website offering user profiles, archives with patient records, or online invoicing tools must adhere strictly to HIPAA regulations and secure patient health data. HIPPA protects the confidentiality of medical records. The standard guidelines specify parameters for the safe and private sharing of electronic medical records. Penalties for HIPAA violations can reach $1.5 million annually, with each event carrying a maximum fine of $50,000.

5. Build Trust for Your Medical Business

There’s a lack of trust between fledgling businesses and established companies in the healthcare industry. So, if you want to succeed in the healthcare industry, you’ll need to network with extensive hospital systems, health insurance providers, and medical device manufacturers. Having a solid business plan with a detailed road map demonstrates your business has ambitions to grow and won’t just perish after receiving seed funding.

6. Hire Employees

As you begin to build your business, one of your top priorities will be hiring the right employees to help you achieve your goals. When choosing candidates for open positions at your company, it’s important to select staff members who have the skills and qualifications needed to excel in their roles. Beyond that, you should also look for individuals who have a strong work ethic, an ability to collaborate well with others, and an interest in helping your medical startup succeed. When you’re ready to hire employees, advertise your healthcare jobs at HeathJobsNationwide.com!

Take the First Step

Starting a medical business from scratch is no small feat. Take crucial steps like choosing the best business structure, researching the market, complying with HIPAA, and hiring capable employees.

By : Stephanie Haywood of MyLifeBoost.com


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Therapists Among the Top 10 Highest Paid Healthcare Pros

Ask most people what the highest paying career in healthcare is and the most likely response will be physician. That’s the right response. Physicians have traditionally been the highest paid in the healthcare industry. But in the most recent MedPage Today list of top ten highest paying healthcare gigs, there are some surprises. For instance, the last two positions on that list go to therapists.

Physical therapists come in at number ten while radiation therapists take the number nine position. Both types of therapy are widely utilized throughout American healthcare to help patients dealing with a variety of health problems. If you were looking to get into healthcare but didn’t want to go the doctor or nurse route, therapy would certainly be an option.

Physical Therapists

Getting back to the MedPage Today list, physical therapists round out the top ten list with an average salary of $91,000 annually. Based on a standard 40-hour work week, physical therapists make about $44 per hour. That’s not bad.

Physical therapists help patients improve their overall health and quality of life by improving mobility, managing pain, and strengthening muscles, tendons, and ligaments. They treat patients suffering from chronic conditions and illnesses. They also help patients recover from injuries and surgeries.

Radiation Therapists

The radiation therapy career is not as well-known. Radiation therapists work alongside oncologists and other members of a patient’s healthcare team to treat cancer. It is the radiation therapist who operates radiation treatment equipment.

This is a highly skilled position that demands appropriate education and training. Radiation therapists work at hospitals or independent cancer treatment clinics, earning a salary of $94,000 annually. They make about $45 per hour based on a 40-hour work week.

If you are in one of these positions, none of this information is new. You are well acquainted with physical and radiation therapists. You also know that the demand for their services is never-ending. The question is this where will you find your next opportunity?

It Starts with the Search

Whether you are looking to change employers or get an extra gig, it all starts with the job search. As we say time and again, our organization can help you find what you are looking for. Healthjobsnationwide.com, presently, has 9k therapist jobs on the site.

Worth the Money

Physical and radiation therapists take the final two spots on the MedPage Today list of the top ten highest paid healthcare professions. They make good money, and they are worth every penny. The same goes for occupational therapists, speech therapists, and so forth.

The employers on our job board know the value of a highly skilled therapists. We know the value of quality jobs. We want to help. Check us out and see


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

8 Reasons for Pursuing a Radiation Therapist Career


By Jessica Donahue, R.T. (R) (T) (ARRT)

Radiation therapists play a critical role in cancer treatment by administering radiation to specific areas of a patient’s body. But more than that, they can enjoy an incredibly rewarding career in healthcare.

I’ve been in the radiation therapy community for more than 20 years and have had the privilege of teaching hundreds of students to become radiation therapists. I’m also chair of the Radiation Therapy Degree Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University. In the following, I’d like to share insights on why you should consider this profession.

1. Become a highly valued healthcare professional within a shorter amount of time

If you’re concerned about the amount of education (and money) it can take to become a healthcare professional, radiation therapy could be an excellent career choice. 

In fact, BusinessInsider.com has radiation therapist on its list of the highest paying jobs not requiring a bachelor’s degree. (Also, U.S. News & World Report puts the profession on two of its Best Jobs lists.)

Depending on the education option you choose — and on your current education level — becoming a radiation therapist can take somewhere between one and four years. 

Here are four possible paths to becoming a radiation therapist:

  • If you’ve already graduated from an associate degree program in the related field of radiologic technology, you can complete a certificate program in radiation therapy in about a year.
  • If you already have a bachelor’s degree in any subject, you may be able to complete a certificate program in radiation therapy in about a year.
  • There are also bachelor degree programs specifically in radiation therapy, which will typically take at least four years to finish.

(See How to Become a Radiation Therapist for more information.)

2. Join a healthcare profession with a promising future

The need for radiation therapists won’t be disappearing anytime soon. For example, cancer risk generally goes up with age. And as the current Baby Boomer generation ages, there will likely be an increased demand for radiation therapists. 

Along with an aging population, this increased demand can also be attributed to improved cancer detection methods and evolving treatments that require a radiation therapist’s expertise.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a positive growth rate (6%) for the radiation therapist profession over the next decade.

3. Enjoy a great work schedule 

The typical work schedule for radiation therapists is an attractive feature of the profession. You usually work in healthcare facilities that operate during daytime hours, Monday through Friday. That also means you usually have weekends, evenings, and holidays off. 

This aspect of the profession makes it an especially good career choice for parents trying to accommodate the needs of their family.

Note that radiation therapists are often needed for full- and part-time positions as well as for traveling therapist positions.

4. Choose a professional path with lots of flexibility

Career flexibility is another appealing feature of this profession. Once you finish a radiation therapy program and take the steps to become registered as a radiation therapist, you’ve completed what the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) calls a “primary eligibility pathway.”

If you’d like, you can then expand your knowledge and credentials through the ARRT’s “postprimary pathways,” which allow you to gain additional certifications in medical imaging procedures like the following:

  • Bone densitometry
  • Computed tomography (CT)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Vascular sonography

And with more qualifications, you can become a more competitive job candidate, have more control over your career direction, and potentially earn more income. 

It’s also worth noting that a background in radiation therapy can also be a valuable foundation for pursuing options such as:

  • Medical device sales and training 
  • Healthcare management roles (which may require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree)
  • Other healthcare professions such as a physician assistant (which would require a professional degree)
  • Directly related professions such as a medical dosimetrist (which would require a professional degree)

6. Make a deeper connection with your patients

Depending on the treatment plan and the nature of the cancer, a patient typically receives radiation treatment five days a week for several weeks in a row. Because of this, radiation therapists are able to become much closer with patients compared to other healthcare professions, and even compared to other members of the cancer treatment team. 

The familiarity you can develop with patients involves more than just delivering treatment. You’re in a position to listen, show compassion, and offer emotional support. You’re often getting to know family members as well.

For many radiation therapists, the daily patient interaction is the single biggest reason why they love their work.

Then there’s the general rhythm of each day. You stay busy and focused with a steady stream of daily patients.

7. Be part of a multidisciplinary cancer treatment team

If you engage with individuals easily and enjoy the atmosphere of being part of a team, then you should definitely explore the field of radiation therapy. 

As a radiation therapist, you work with other team members, prepare patients for their treatments, practice safe protocols by working in pairs, and interact with additional department staff such as nurses, dosimetrists, nutritionists, and radiation oncologists.

Then, of course, there are the patients you have the privilege of helping every day.

8. Work with advanced technology in an environment that fits with your preferences

As a radiation therapist, you’ll be on the front lines of cancer treatment as you work daily with cutting-edge medical technology. And as that technology advances, it also creates opportunities for you to continually learn something new. 

In fact, you’ll have opportunities for life-long learning with continuing education courses through meetings, hands-on training, and directed readings provided through the American Society of Radiologic Technologists

Make the next move and start exploring programs

In a relatively short amount of time, you could be delivering potentially life-saving treatment and enjoying an extremely rewarding career. Could joining the profession of radiation therapy be right for you?  

If you’re intrigued by the information you’ve just read, I recommend that you take the next important step and start exploring radiation therapy programs today! 


Jessica Donahue, B.S. R.T. (R) (T) (ARRT) is an experienced radiation therapist and is also Program Chair for the Radiation Therapy Degree Program at Northwestern Health Sciences University. 


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Modern Medical Jobs: Trading Gig Work for Steady Employment?

Medical jobs come in all shapes and sizes. There are private practice doctors and therapists and those employed by hospital groups, clinics, etc. Nurses can choose to work for an employer or freelance as a temporary/per diem provider. At times, the options may seem limitless. But what are the differences between gig work and steady employment?

MarketWatch contributor Kelly James wrote a fascinating piece in late July 2022 about his transition from freelance writing to corporate work. While his experience isn’t identical to healthcare workers who trade self-employment for medical jobs, there are some similarities worth examining.

To set this up, the equivalent of gig work in the medical field is contract work. Medical professionals fill temporary needs on contracts, either arranged on their own or through a temporary/per diem provider. They are self-employed in every sense of the word.

Self-Employment Freedom

In Kelly’s case, he first gave up a lucrative career as a lawyer to become a freelance writer. It was something he had dreamed about for a long time. Going the freelance route afforded him the freedom to be his own boss. He was able to make his own schedule, do something he loved to do, and earn a very good living. It seemed perfect.

Likewise, there is no shortage of doctors, nurses and therapists who have traded in traditional medical employment for the temporary/per diem lifestyle. As prn providers, they are able to take contracts that suit them. They can work when they want to and take time off when necessary. They can even combine work and travel.

The Downsides

In Kelly’s cases, there were downsides. He went back to the corporate world almost out of necessity. He decided that life circumstances required him to have a traditional job with a steady paycheck and medical insurance and was willing to give up being his own boss to get those two things.

Temporary/per diem providers are in a slightly different position. Demand for their services is so high that they rarely need to actively drum up new business. As for health insurance, it is still expensive. But a practitioner who chooses to work through a temporary/per diem agency might get health insurance included as part of the package.

Traditional Employment Stability

Kelly’s return to the corporate world was easy, at first. He enjoyed the routine and He enjoyed getting to know his coworkers and being able to collaborate with them. He certainly enjoyed the stability that comes with working for someone else.

Doctors, nurses, and therapists are no different. More than one locum has returned to traditional employment for the same reasons that drove Kelly back to the corporate world. Self-employment has its perks, but traditional medical jobs offer the kind of stability that doesn’t come with freelancing.

Controlled by Someone Else

On the downside, traditional employment brings with it the burden of being controlled by someone else. Kelly left his first corporate job due to a micromanager who controlled his day so tightly that he felt he couldn’t breathe. Healthcare executives and managers can be equally controlling.

Kelly also had to give up the freedom of making his own schedule and the satisfaction that comes from building a business of his own. Likewise, transitioning from temporary work to a traditional medical job pretty much eliminates work freedom.

Both gig work and traditional employment have their positives and negatives. For most people, traditional employment is the preferred option. But there are some who taste the freedom of self-employment and never look back. That is the way it is in every industry. Medical jobs are no exception.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

The Great Resignation Isn’t Sparing Healthcare

We have been hearing about the Great Resignation for about a year now. Just in case you’ve been living under a rock, the Great Resignation is a phenomenon that has seen millions of people leave their jobs since the start of the COVID pandemic. Some are leaving to find employment elsewhere within the same industry. Others are retiring early. Still others are looking for a complete change, looking for work in an entirely different field or starting a new business.

Unfortunately for healthcare, the Great Resignation isn’t sparing it. Just look at nurse practitioner jobs. They are as plentiful now as they have ever been. The same goes for nursing jobs, physician jobs, therapist jobs, and on and on. It is not clear where all the disaffected workers are going, but it is clear that healthcare facilities are now having to work harder than they ever have in the past to fill open positions.

Looking for Something New

It is not surprising that job boards would have a lot more open doctor, nurse, and nurse practitioner jobs since the start of the pandemic. Healthcare delivery was obviously at the forefront of the pandemic. It still is. A lot of healthcare professionals just had their fill in the troubled year that was 2020. Many have decided it is time for a change.

Out in Idaho, the Idaho Press recently published an article about a group of healthcare professionals who had gotten together to discuss life after healthcare. Some of them were in the position of transitioning to new careers while others had already made the switch. The group represented everyone from nurse practitioners to therapists.

It is interesting that these professionals wanted to share their stories, not to encourage other healthcare workers to abandoned ship, but to let them know that other things were out there should they decide to try something new. That’s really what all of this is about. Whether it is healthcare or some other industry, the Great Resignation is about switching gears.

Those Who Stay Behind

Virtually every industry is reeling from the fallout of the Great Resignation. Those who stay behind have their own choices to make. Do they stay, or do they go? In healthcare, employers are doing everything they can to make sure their people stay. They have every reason to do so.

It goes without saying that healthcare workers are in the driver’s seat right now. They have a lot of leverage to ask for changes. Healthcare facilities have little choice but to comply with every reasonable request. Otherwise, they stand to continue losing workers to the Great Resignation.

From nurse practitioner jobs to allied health jobs, things in healthcare are changing rapidly. That is one of the things the group in Idaho mentioned. Many of the healthcare professionals who have decided to move on say that the modern work environment is nothing like what they knew when they first got started. Again, this is understandable. Nothing remains unchanged forever.

The Opportunities Are There

Even as the Great Resignation continues, opportunities for employment abound. If you are looking for nurse practitioner jobs, you will find plenty here on our jobs board. The same goes for therapist jobs, physician jobs, etc. Take the time to look around and maybe post your resume. There are employers out there very much interested in speaking with you.

In the meantime, the healthcare sector will have to continue changing in order to adapt to the modern workforce. The old ways of doing things are not going to work any longer. The faster healthcare adapts, the faster it will right the employment ship and start moving forward again.


Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.