How Much PAs and NPs Make in Every State

How much do PAs and NPs make across the U.S.? We found out. How does your salary stack up against the average?

Using the latest data available from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, we dug up the average salaries for PAs and NPs across the United States.

Some quick takeaways from the findings are:

  • NPs earn the most, on average, in California, Alaska, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York.
  • PAs see top pay, on average, in Connecticut, Washington, Alaska, Hawaii, and California.
  • On average, the least lucrative states for NPs are Alabama, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Kansas, and Kentucky.
  • For PAs, Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Alabama pay the least, on average.
  • PAs are paid more than NPs in the majority of the country, including 25 states, as well as the District of Columbia, though NP salaries outpace PA salaries in terms of dollar amount, as a whole.

How does your salary stack up against the average? Find out below.

State Physician Assistant
Average Annual Salary:
Nurse Practitioner
Average Annual Salary:
Alabama $92,880 $95,970
Alaska $122,260 $122,880
Arizona $101,590 $110,750
Arkansas $99,280 $104,300
California $117,230 $133,780
Colorado $102,770 $111,210
Connecticut $125,610 $118,020
Delaware $105,300 $108,340
District of Columbia $114,740 $109,800
Florida $105,930 $101,100
Georgia $103,190 $106,750
Hawaii $121,120 $120,570
Idaho $109,090 $102,600
Illinois $108,260 $105,800
Indiana $96,090 $103,200
Iowa $110,550 $106,290
Kansas $104,720 $99,430
Kentucky $91,010 $99,790
Louisiana $85,990 $105,340
Maine $110,030 $103,220
Maryland $108,180 $115,060
Massachusetts $108,700 $122,740
Michigan $110,240 $106,880
Minnesota $116,200 $119,160
Mississippi $81,130 $109,700
Missouri $94,480 $102,470
Montana $106,130 $103,510
Nebraska $106,700 $103,800
Nevada $116,850 $112,540
New Hampshire $111,080 $109,460
New Jersey $116,270 $122,100
New Mexico $108,610 $109,810
New York $117,000 $120,970
North Carolina $104,680 $104,100
North Dakota $107,340 $106,200
Ohio $105,410 $101,970
Oklahoma $104,200 $103,280
Oregon $113,570 $110,010
Pennsylvania $98,510 $98,250
Rhode Island $103,710 $109,290
South Carolina $103,710 $99,910
South Dakota $102,830 $100,690
Tennessee $87,700 $95,990
Texas $109,590 $111,060
Utah $102,710 $105,840
Vermont $106,520 $106,000
Virginia $99,340 $105,170
Washington $123,980 $117,650
West Virginia $104,180 $100,690
Wisconsin $107,920 $106,790
Wyoming $116,890 $116,030

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Report: PAs/NPs Provide Similar or Better Care than Doctors

A new report from a World Health Organization team indicates that non-physicians, such as PAs and NPs, provide comparable care to that of physicians.

Nurse practitioners, physician assistants, midwives, and other non-physicians deliver care that is comparable to or better than that provided by MDs, and are often more well-liked than physicians, according to a new report from a World Health Organization team.

It was noted in the WHO bulletin that they are especially effective in delivering babies, caring for AIDS patients, and helping people care for chronic diseases, like diabetes and high blood pressure.

“While some physician groups have resisted wider use of such professionals, they should embrace them because they are often less expensive to deploy and are far more willing to work in rural areas,” the WHO experts are quoted as saying.

Read More →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

APRNs and PAs Ranked Among Highest Paying Jobs in Healthcare

Advanced practitioners are enjoying advanced wages, and two spots on a new top ten list of the highest paying jobs in healthcare.

Advanced practitioners, such as Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, and Certified Nurse Midwives seem to be enjoying advanced salaries, according to a new top ten list of high paying jobs in healthcare from CNBC.

While the average annual wage for healthcare workers clocks in around $65,000—well above the median annual wage for all occupations in the U.S. of $37,690—advanced practitioners are seeing salaries upwards of $100k, landing them prime spots on the CNBC list.

Physician assistants ranked seventh, with a median annual wage of $104,860. Nurse anesthetists, midwives, and practitioners, collectively took fifth place, with a median annual wage of $110,930, and were outranked only by pharmacists, podiatrists, dentists, and physicians/surgeons, which took the top spot with salaries greater than or equal to $208,000.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Kim’s Blog: “See You Down The Road”

How do you ask patients about end-of-life wishes? Kimberly Spering, MSN, FNP-BC discusses her experience with having this crucial conversation.

by Kimberly Spering, MSN, FNP-BC

How do you ask patients about end-of-life wishes? I think this is a difficult question… with difficult answers. Truly, end-of-life discussions are fraught with angst, sometimes anger, hopelessness… but sometimes, they can lead to hope, and a willingness to discuss goals of care.

“Crucial conversations.” These are the questions that providers ask, trying to elicit patients’ goals of care, fears or concerns, hopes and wishes, and wants for their end-of-life. These are oh-so-important conversations with people… yet, so few providers really ASK the questions… or listen to the answers. I fully understand this. In the busyness of a day, with metrics to meet, tons of patients to see, conversations that take time are… difficult. And uncomfortable. However, they are still important.

For me, it’s been an interesting few days, to say the least. I held hospice discussions with many patients — two signed on in the past few days, and one most likely will do so.

The first patient has fought two different cancers over the past two years. When I met her 10 months ago, she expressed a desire to pursue treatment – so long as the side effects weren’t worse than the disease itself. At that time, and in the months following that visit, I would routinely question what her wishes were. Until the visit this week, nothing changed.

Fast forward to seeing her this week. She was beyond emaciated. More weight loss… but yet, she had large amounts of peripheral edema due to her albumin being super-low. Her oncologist prescribed Lasix… which worked briefly, then had no effect. She had almost every side effect to her chemotherapy that could happen. Yes, she had medications to off-set side effects, but those meds had side effects as well.

In short, she was suffering greatly.

I noted her worsening cachexia, dark circles under her eyes, unsteadiness on her feet. “Tell me how you are doing,” I asked, guessing full-well that I knew what horrors she experienced.

“I’m DONE. I’m FINISHED fighting this cancer. I stopped my treatment one week ago,” having stopped the two medications designed to fight it.

She was resolute. We discussed her side effects, her quality of life (which was non-existent at this point), and her goals of care.

“I don’t want to die at home. He (her husband) can’t take care of me.” We discussed that inpatient hospice was for patients with uncontrollable symptoms or a limited (2-week) life expectancy, or for management of uncontrolled symptoms. It is NOT, however, for patients with a longer time to death. She wasn’t willing to consider an assisted living or skilled nursing facility. I discussed what home hospice would entail for her, with as much support as needed.

Ultimately, I connected with hospice and had services initiated.

Another patient has severe aortic stenosis, diastolic CHF, CAD, CKD 4, and a plethora of other co-morbidities. I met her several years ago, and surprisingly, she has done well for the past several years… until four months ago. She has had increasing chest pain, worsening CKD, esophageal dysmotility, and a bunch of other symptoms.

During my last visit, I floated the idea of hospice to her daughter and son-in-law, given the progressive decline I’d observed. We talked at length, but held off. Today, her daughter wanted to discuss hospice again. The patient had been to the ED & hospice was discussed with another family member.

After a robust, engaging conversation with her daughter today, I approached the patient.

We discussed the course of her disease processes over the past few years, particularly the past few months. Initially, she felt she should return to the hospital for urgent treatment. “Doesn’t everyone go to the hospital if in trouble?” she asked.

Well… no, I explained, people don’t HAVE to go. We discussed her goals of care and desires for comfort over treatment. Her AS and CKD really limited her treatment options. Diuretic increases would worsen her renal function. BP modifications could decrease her cardiac output and worsen her AS.

So… in the realm of “treat everything,” what does one do?

One option is to offer hospice as an additional option for 24/7 support. I described their services, the concerns I had that her going back to the hospital would offer limited treatment options, and their desires for extra support and aggressive symptom management.

We had a lively discussion of what that would entail. Ultimately, the patient and her family will discuss the pros/cons of hospice, and let me know if they want to start those services.

My last patient was a WWII veteran, married for 72 years, and a wonderful story-teller. Someone with ESRD, combined CHF, atrial fibrillation, and a plethora of other health problems. I spent a lot of time listening to his war stories… which over time, included his PTSD (called “shell-shock” in those days). His wife told me privately he had never shared any of his experiences with her. After his retirement, he spent years being an auctioneer… until his eyesight failed, rendering him unable to read the bids.

Over the years that I saw him, I loved listening to his stories: stories about the war, stories about his family, heart-break when family members died unexpectedly, worries about his wife’s health issues (only spoken when we were alone). We discussed his progressive disease, including CHF, ESRD, atrial fibrillation, etc. I watched, as time took its toll on this soldier.

Today, I came to his home, only to find him bed-bound, on oxygen, and extremely weak. “What happened?” I exclaimed. He was discharged home from the hospital a few weeks previously, but not in this state.

I discovered that his cardiologist (not part of our hospital network) had ordered oxygen last week. I had no notes… no idea of what had transpired. His wife was of limited help, due to her own memory issues.

Quickly, I called my staff to get records ASAP. I did an immediate assessment – nothing unstable, but still… his respiratory rate was elevated. He had pain in certain areas. He was only voiding 1–2 times daily (this… for someone with prior nocturia 3 times nightly, and voiding every 2 hours while awake). He wasn’t eating or drinking.

In my assessment, he was starting the process of actively dying.

We discussed his disease progression, his declining status, his goals of care, his fears and hopes. His biggest worry: “I want to make sure that she (his wife) is alright.” He was worried about the dying process, but acknowledged that it was his time. Meanwhile, his wife, teary-eyed, told me that their daughter was of limited support, and that she could not rely on her. She only had a nephew and nieces – both of whom support was limited.

We discussed his situation and symptoms, symptom management, spiritual concerns, and we did a life review. For those unaware of the latter, it is a discussion of all of the things that a person has accomplished or succeeded at over the course of his/her life. It is profoundly moving, and often facilitates a patient’s acceptance of their end-of-life status. I reminded him of the stories that he shared over the past year or so. We chucked at some of his jokes. I laid on their bed, as he was extremely HOH, talking about these stories.

At the end, I asked him what he wanted most. His biggest concern was that his wife would be OK, able to function on her own. She teared up, but told him she would be OK.

I kissed him on his forehead and gave him a hug, telling him that I wanted him to rest. Hospice would be coming shortly, and he needed to regain some energy.

He thank me for all of my care, then told me, “See you down the road.”

I choked up, swallowing back tears. “I love that. I’m going to remember that and use it,” I managed to get out. Then, as I smiled at and hugged him, I left the room, tears swimming in my eyes.

His wife followed me. I spent another 30 minutes talking to her, trying to help her cope with the upcoming loss of someone so dear… trying to help her realize that she was not alone. Trying to help her elicit hospice support when it started.

“Will you come to see me? I have no one…” she stated.

You bet I will. Patients/families like this are few and far between. I will try to see all of the people that I’ve followed… even if I can’t be their NP. Sometimes, just being a friendly face helps.

I just LOVE being able to connect with people, sharing their stories over time. But it is so incredibly hard to direct people to the realization that they are at the end of their life. That disease-directed therapy is not working. That hospice-supportive care is the way to go to support their end-of-life needs.

In my palliative work, I am blessed in having the time to discuss these issues over time with patients and families. I am blessed to have the medical foresight to help predict their course of illness.

Death has its own timetable. It waits for no one. It is the one INEVITABLE outcome for all of us — the timing or reason unknown for most. I can estimate when the end will occur, but a higher being only knows when that occurs (God for some, HaShem for others, Allah for some, etc.).

I’m going to shout out to my hospice and palliative medicine colleagues here. They have helped initiate needed services. They work tirelessly in the trenches for patient care. They support us when needed.

Ultimately, patients and families can be supported, even when death is imminent… or prolonged.

What does a peaceful death look like to patients? Or you? Are health care providers and families willing to ask the hard questions: their goals of care, fears or concerns, wishes/bucket list items? These are tough conversations, but crucial ones.

Let’s honor patients’ wishes, by supporting them, asking the tough questions. Asking their goals and wishes, fears and concerns, what is most important to them, what is crucial to living their lives, and also, who is their support.

And a hearty, “see you down the road” as well.


Kim Spering has been a nurse for over 25 years and worked as an NP over the past 15 years in Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Internal Medicine, and now Palliative Medicine. She serves as an editorial board member of Clinician 1 and submit blogs to the website, with a goal of highlighting both the clinician and patient experience in health care.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Demand for Newly Certified PAs is Strong

Demand is high and the job market is strong for newly certified PAs, according to a new report by the National Commission of Certified Physician Assistants.

Demand for and the job market remain strong for newly certified PAs, according to new data released in the 2017 Statistical Profile of Recently Certified Physician Assistants by the National Commission of Certified Physician Assistants (NCCPA).

The robust report, which is based on survey responses received from 6,843 of the 8,788 PAs who obtained certification in 2017, aims to offer insight into the future of the PA workforce, as well as its current state.

Highlights from the report include:

  • On average, PAs made $95,000 as a starting salary in 2017.
  • Recently certified PAs are practicing in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.
  • The top states with the greatest number of recently Certified PAs are New York (902), Pennsylvania (699), Florida (567), California (548), North Carolina (440), and Texas (440).
  • 67.2% of respondents accepted a clinical position as a PA in 2017.
  • 77.4% of PAs who accepted a position received two or more job offers, and 79.3% of newly employed PAs indicated that they did not face any challenges when searching for a job.
  • 52.8% of recently certified PAs who have accepted a position work in a hospital setting and 29.9% are working in an office-based private practice setting.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Kim’s Blog: What If The Priority of Our Visit is Addressing Social Needs and Non-Compliance

Kim Spering encourages you to look for the real reasons patients don’t show up on time, don’t take their medications, and seem to go against medical advice.

by Kimberly Spering, MSN, FNP-BC

In my palliative care work, making home visits, we often find patients’ needs to be dire for basic necessities. What if simply being able to EAT was one of those needs? What if, for example, a patient’s reasons for not going to office visits was simply – he couldn’t afford transportation?

It was my second visit with a thin, elderly gentleman. During the first visit, he shared that his HUD housing management had sent him a written eviction notice for “multiple infractions.” I reviewed the multi-page document they sent him. Frankly, none of these so-called incidents seemed to warrant eviction.

Speaking softly, muffled due to his lack of teeth and his Parkinson’s disease, I pieced together his story.

He had been diagnosed with PD years ago, after many years with vague symptoms. He was prescribed Sinemet TID, but takes it QID on his own, as the tremors and gait freezing worsened after 3 hours of each dose. Which means… he runs out of medication before the next refill. So, he suffers more during the last week of the month. He also has subsequent cognitive short-term memory deficits as a result of the disorder.

He has had multiple mental health issues, addiction, and other social problems over the years. He sees a psychiatrist, addiction specialist, and therapist to help him through these problems.

He does not drive, and relies on public bus transportation for appointments. Guess what: now, he cannot afford the tickets. As a result, he often no-shows for appointments, thus getting him a “reputation” for “non-compliant behavior.” And let’s face it, no one looks into the details. It doesn’t matter if he can’t afford that bus pass – he is now “labeled” as “non-compliant.” He does not always know what number to call to cancel his appointments. (by the way… side bar. I loathe that term. I prefer, “non-adherent.” It’s less judgmental, in my opinion.)

In recent months, he forgot that he put pots on the stove while heating up his food. One incident led to the local fire department being dispatched. After that, his building management decided they would disconnect his stove. So now, he can’t even heat up any meals that he may get.

Also, financially, he has no extra money to pay for food, after medication co-pays. For some reason, even though he had Medical Assistance, his plan did not cover his medications. So an albuterol inhaler costs him $58… which he did not have. He has an enlarged cervical lymph node, which I presume is cancer-till-proven-otherwise, given his ETOH use/smoking, but I wrote a Rx for Keflex, hoping against hope it would help. It did, albeit marginally. He still needs evaluation for the mass. He can’t afford the bus fare to go for a visit. He also was visibly short of breath when I saw him, which likely would have improved by using that inhaler — had he been able to afford it.

I then found out that he ONLY eats when going to local soup kitchens. THREE TIMES PER WEEK, Tuesdays through Thursdays. He barely eats in-between. He had one can of tuna in the apartment. He has lost over 40 lbs… 16 lbs in the previous 6 weeks from my first visit. He is at the brink of being emaciated at this point.

Our one local food bank will deliver a food box to anyone in the apartment complex who needs it – once per month. He never got one, because he has been at the soup kitchen for his meal when the group arrives. He was told by management that they would not save a box for him, nor deliver it to his door, because “people would steal it.”

I was not only appalled, but incensed that this was the case.

So… here is a man who eats three hearty meals per WEEK, living sparingly on a can of tuna here-and-there in-between. He has no other recourse. There is minimal family involvement. He can’t access outside resources. I wanted to cry when viewing his situation.

Fortunately, he is enrolled in our Community Care Team (encompassing nurses, social workers, pharmacists, mental health specialists) through his PCP office. I sent a message to the RN on his case, detailing the grim realities of not having food. He has a community health worker at the one local church who tries to help him where possible.

On the day of my second visit, I had a palliative care fellow with me. He suggested Meals on Wheels.

On the inside, I kicked myself for not thinking of this sooner. Then I discovered that if he was frequenting soup kitchens (even only 3 days per week), he may not qualify for it. So… go to soup kitchens with a guaranteed meal three times per week… but still, he should qualify for two meals per day from MOW based on his income.

Alas, there is the logistical nightmare of trying to follow him if/once he gets evicted.

“I’ll be homeless,” he stated firmly.

“What about the Mission?” – a local resource for homeless men. They have to leave during the day, but can return for hot meals and a place to sleep in the evening, counseling, and help to get back on track.

“Nope. No way,” he said. From reading between-the-lines, and knowing he hadn’t conquered his addictions, I knew that a Christian organization would clash with his wishes for care, particularly if he used drugs.

“What about your family?”

“Eh, one daughter drops by on occasion with food. The others – they don’t call me, ever.”

What is a provider to do when faced with this scenario?

Well… for one: focus on what you can do immediately. In contacting the CCT team, I tried to enlist others in support for this patient. I fully realize… I can only do so much myself. Get the team involved.

Second: reiterate the positive issues with the patient. There may be only ONE, but try to find a positive way to reinforce great behaviors: staying clean, staying sober, calling to make and keeping appointments, etc.

Third: realize that taking these steps is truly a process… one fraught with roadblocks, challenges, and fortunately, sometimes, successes.

For every roadblock encountered, think of how you are helping that person.

Let’s broaden the perspective, shall we? This applies in my patient’s case.

For every provider who faces frequent no-shows or late patients, or patients who don’t “follow orders:” consider looking for the real reasons that patients don’t show up on time, don’t take their medications, and seem to go against medical advice. Often there is a good reason for their actions (or inactions). I admit – I used to chafe and get mad when no-shows occurred… or when patients showed up 30 minutes late, throwing the day’s schedule in disarray. It took some time and patience to dig deep, to find out the reasons. It was NOT simply that patients were inconsiderate or lazy (something I continue to hear from other providers to this day). Perhaps the bus was running late. Perhaps their ride no-showed or had other, more pressing issues. Back in the days of seeing patients in the office, I would be annoyed at the so-called lack of “consideration” of patients showing up on time.

I’ve seen a new side of the patient experience by seeing them in the home. Believe me when I say, the LEAST of many people’s concerns is getting to their office visit on time.

I’m fortunate that I finally can see things as they are for many patients. Fortunate to have the resources to try to help them any way we can.

Patients’ social history may seem like a thing to bypass, to ignore. Please… as one “in the trenches,” seeing their reality, hearing their stories – those stories are crucial to their care. Take the time to hear them. Advocate for them. Use your own resources in your practice to delegate aspects of their care.

Listen and acknowledge their social history. It’s vital to understand what patients face. But above all, please don’t label them “non-compliant,” particularly if you don’t know the whole background story.


Kim Spering has been a nurse for over 25 years and worked as an NP over the past 15 years in Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Internal Medicine, and now Palliative Medicine. She serves as an editorial board member of Clinician 1 and submit blogs to the website, with a goal of highlighting both the clinician and patient experience in health care.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Entrepreneurship for Clinicians

Have you ever thought there might be more to your career than clinical practice? Explore the idea of entrepreneurship with Jordan Roberts and Dave Mittman.

By Jordan G Roberts, PA-C

As you may have noticed, the NCCPA and AAPA have teamed up to promote PA’s during PA week 2018 with social media and national public relations campaigns. To add to this, I wanted to share and promote more great work done by PA’s in the business and entrepreneurial space.

Many PAs – clinicians in general even – do not feel they were built for ‘business.’ We like patient care as much as we like leaving the numbers to the administrators and industry folks. I think this comes from our training and our culture. In fact, when I was a PA student, someone told me how “lucky” I was that I wouldn’t have to worry about the business side of healthcare.

However, this made no sense to me, so I started poking around and asking questions. You see, my family is made up of lawyers, accountants, and entrepreneurs. There is a distinct lack of relatives with a medical background. With their backgrounds, they have all taught me valuable lessons that I can directly apply to my role as a clinician, employee, and entrepreneur myself.

To me, dismissing the bottom line means giving up job security and leverage. After all, in today’s corporate healthcare environment, better patient care doesn’t always mean better profits. Therefore, by not knowing your impact on the financial health of your organization, you limit your potential impact on the real health of your patients.

With that in mind, I spoke to a PA who has started multiple successful businesses all the while remaining active as a PA leader and advocate. Dave Mittman and I recorded our conversation for the Clinician1 Podcast, just one of his successful ventures. Please forgive the sound quality in some parts, this was our first episode and there were some technical difficulties.

In this episode, Mittman describes the difference between a non-clinical and non-traditional career, reasons why a clinician might choose this path, and tells us about some examples of successful clinician-run startups.

Listen to the show or read the article by clicking here.


Jordan G Roberts, PA-C helps medical education companies create and distribute the best medical education around. He helps students and clinicians improve their clinical game by using his background in neuroscience to teach simple ways to learn complex medical topics. He is a published researcher, national speaker, and medical writer. He can be found at Modern MedEd where he promotes clinical updates, medical writing, and medical education.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Three Ways to Celebrate PA Week

Here are three ways to celebrate PAs, while also raising awareness of the profession’s significant impacts on healthcare, from October 6th through 12th.

National PA Week is an annual week-long event, from October 6th through October 12th, which aims to not only celebrate the profession, but educate the public in regards to the value PAs add to healthcare.

Here are three ways to celebrate, while also raising awareness.

Take to Social Media

Raise awareness for PAs by using the hashtag #PAWeek while you celebrate your profession and peers across social media, or better yet, share the AAPA produced “Your PA Can Handle It” video.

Get Political

Advocate for your profession on Capitol Hill by joining the only federal healthcare Political Action Committee (PA PAC) dedicated to advancing the PA profession. To learn more about or to join the PA PAC, please click here.

Make a Small Donation

A great way to make a difference for PAs nationwide is by making a small monetary donation to the PA Foundation’s Pay It Forward campaign. This is a great way to honor a peer or mentor, while also making a lasting impact.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

New Legislation Arms Advanced Practitioners in the Fight Against Opioids

More than 115 Americans die every day from opioid-related causes. The SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act, which passed in the House last week, aims to stop that.

The U.S. opioid epidemic is a grave and serious crisis. Each day, more than 115 Americans die of opioid-related causes. A new “opioid package” passed in the U.S. House of Representatives last week, however, is taking aim at combatting the crisis.

H.R. 6, also known as the Substance Use Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act of 2018 is seen as a compromise between the House and Senate, which previously passed their own separate opioid abuse prevention packages. The SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act, as it’s being called, is expected to be considered by the Senate in the coming days and then be sent to the President’s desk to be signed into law.

One of the major provisions of the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act applies directly to advanced practitioners:

“Enable clinical nurse specialists, certified nurse midwives, and certified registered nurse anesthetists to prescribe buprenorphine; and make the buprenorphine prescribing authority for physician assistants and nurse practitioners permanent. In addition, H.R. 6 will permit a waivered-practitioner to immediately start treating 100 patients at a time with buprenorphine (skipping the initial 30 patient cap) if the practitioner has board certification in addiction medicine or addiction psychiatry; or if practitioner provides MAT in a qualified practice setting. Medications, such as buprenorphine, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, provide a whole-patient approach to the treatment of opioid use disorder (H.R. 3692)”

Both the AANP and AAPA consider this legislation a win.

“With this agreement, Congress has reaffirmed the power of America’s 248,000 NPs to fight and win the battle against opioid addiction. The legislation permanently authorizes NPs to prescribe Medication-Assisted Treatments (MATs), further expanding patient access to these critical treatments—prescribed and managed by NPs,” AANP President Joyce Knestrick, Ph.D., C-FNP, APRN, FAANP said in a statement released last week.

Jonathan E. Sobel, DMSc, MBA, PA-C, DFAAPA, FAPACVS, president and chair of the AAPA Board of Directors, echoed that sentiment in his statement, saying, “AAPA applauds Congress for including this crucial provision as part of comprehensive legislation aimed at stemming the tide of the U.S. opioid epidemic.”

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Steal this Recruiter’s Tips to Land the Perfect Job

Seeking a competitive advantage to help you land your perfect job? Look no further than this advice from a clinician who has been involved in hiring.

By Jordan G Roberts, PA-C

No matter your profession, job searching can be hard. On top of the everyday challenges, the internet has no shortage of advice with questionable authority.

There are entire blogs written by human resources professionals filled with tips and insights they say will help you land any job. However, they don’t fully address the unique needs of a clinician’s job search.

When it comes to hiring healthcare professionals, employers have the advantage of hiring consultants if necessary. Where can clinicians turn when they need a new job?

Recruiters and healthcare-specific job boards like HealthJobsNationwide.com are one source. They can tell you what characteristics clients are seeking for certain positions, which is great.

Another strategy is to obtain insider tips. In today’s article, we have tips and advice from one of the premier sources for hiring PA’s and NP’s. Renee Dahring, FNP is a former owner of a clinician staffing agency and current correctional healthcare NP.

One of the best places you can find job search advice and strategies is a clinician who has been involved in the hiring process. This article expands on my interview with NP Dahring from the Clinician1 podcast.

Read the article and get the competitive advantage that will help you land your perfect job by clicking here. Once you’ve soaked it all up, come back to HealthJobsNationwide.com to put your new skills in action.


Jordan G Roberts, PA-C helps medical education companies create and distribute the best medical education around. He helps students and clinicians improve their clinical game by using his background in neuroscience to teach simple ways to learn complex medical topics. He is a published researcher, national speaker, and medical writer. He can be found at Modern MedEd where he promotes clinical updates, medical writing, and medical education.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.