Two Healthcare Majors Ranked “Most Valuable”

Two medical and health sciences and services fields of study were ranked in the top 10 most valuable college majors according to a new survey.

Two medical and health sciences and services fields of study were ranked in the top 10 most valuable college majors by Bankrate.com, a personal finance website. Health and Medical Preparatory Programs ranked fourth on the list, while Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Administration was ranked sixth.

To determine the rankings, Bankrate.com examined the most recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey. The data was used to rank 162 majors based on a variety of factors, including the degree holder’s average annual income, the unemployment rate for college graduates with that degree, and whether a degree holder’s career path required a higher degree, such as a master’s degree or doctoral degree.

According to Bankrate.com, Health and Medical Preparatory Programs degree holders earn an average annual salary of $130,308, and their unemployment rate is only 2.3%, while Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Administration graduates earn $103,350 on average annually, and have an unemployment rate of 1.8%.

Comparatively, the least valuable major is Miscellaneous Fine Arts, ranking at #162 on the list, with an average annual salary of $40,855 and an unemployment rate of 9.1%.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Great Side Hustles for Nurses

Though RNs make an average annual salary of $70,000, sometimes, a little extra cash can go a long way. Here are four side jobs perfect for nurses.

Though Registered Nurses make a strong average annual salary when compared to that of the national average ($70,000 versus $44,564), a little more money in your pocket couldn’t hurt, be it to make getting by a little easier or to save for a big purchase or a rainy day. Fortunately, RNs have a specialized skill set that makes them a natural fit for some great side jobs, in addition to their day-to-day roles (and paychecks). Here are four options to consider, if you want to make a little more cash on the side.

Give Flu Shots
Flu season is upon us, and with it, nurses are needed to administer flu shots in clinics, doctors’ offices, grocery stores, pharmacies, and more.

Teach CPR and First Aid
CPR and First Aid classes are available year-round, through a variety of organizations, so the work can be fairly steady. Though you’ll need to be certified as an instructor first, the cost is low and the process is fairly quick.

Tutor Nursing Students
Set your own hours and rate, and tutor the next generation of nurses for NCLEX prep, either in-person or online.

Per Diem Shifts
Per diem nursing offers a flexible work schedule, for a typically higher wage. And, bonus, taking on freelance shifts in underserved areas can be rewarding in more ways than just the pay.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare Continues Adding Jobs; Unemployment Hits 49 Year Low

The unemployment rate is at a 49 year low, and healthcare’s steady and consistent job growth is one factor as to why.

Healthcare added 26,000 jobs in September, including 12,000 in hospitals, 10,300 in ambulatory care, and 3,400 in nursing care facilities, according to numbers released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday.

The constant and steady growth of jobs in the healthcare sector has contributed to what is now the lowest unemployment rate (3.7%) in 49 years.

Over the year, healthcare has added 302,000 jobs.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Nursing Jobs, Cost of Living, & Where to Hang Your Hat

Making decisions about your work-style and lifestyle can be fraught with anxiety and concern about the future—let’s unpack that conundrum.

From Nurse Keith’s Digital Doorway

In my work as a career coach for nurses and healthcare professionals, I frequently witness those who work in nursing struggling with decisions related to finding work and the relative cost of living in terms of where they live or where they might move.

Making decisions about your work-style and lifestyle can be fraught with anxiety and concern about the future — let’s unpack that conundrum.

Workstyle and Lifestyle

Figuring out where to live and work can be a difficult choice. On the one hand, you want to earn up to your potential and receive the highest possible wage according to your level of experience and expertise. On the other hand, the highest salaries are generally in large popular metropolitan areas where the cost of living is through the roof and the relatively high salary will just barely (if at all) make up the difference when compared to more moderately priced cities or towns.

A single working professional may have much more freedom of movement than one who is married, but finding a way to afford single life in more expensive areas can be a challenge.

Choosing a new domicile becomes even more complicated when children are in the picture. Whereas a single person may simply look at nightlife, cultural amenities, cost of living, safety, etc, the nursing professional with children must also consider school quality and everything that comes with the needs of growing children.

Choosing an underserved rural area may offer a quiet place to live and low cost of living for someone who loves the outdoors, but for a nurse with a regular habit of going out to movies, theater, and other nightlife activities, the flip side will be discovering how to have those amenities in the city without breaking the bank.

Your chosen lifestyle and workstyle need to be fairly aligned; if you have a spouse and kids, these decisions are more complex but not impossible to overcome. And while work can sometimes take up a third or more of your life, it can’t always be the sole factor that determines where you rest your head at night.

The Best Places to Live

Here in the United States, there is a wide diversity of choices related to climate, safety, way of life, economics, diversity, educational opportunities, housing costs, crime, and culture. And we all know that one person’s paradise can be another’s purgatory.

Money Magazine and Realtor.com crunched the numbers for 2018, creating a list of the 50 best places to live in the United States. The communities were examined using a methodology that looked at areas with populations over 50,000; the rankings were compiled based on the examination of over 70 types of data, including those mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

Somewhat surprisingly (or not), the 50 winners aren’t all household names like San Francisco, Boulder, or Dallas. Here are the top 10:

  1. Frisco, Texas
  2. Ashburn, Virginia
  3. Carmel, Indiana
  4. Ellicott City, Maryland
  5. Cary, North Carolina
  6. Franklin, Tennessee
  7. Dublin, California
  8. Highlands Ranch, Colorado
  9. Sammamish, Washington
  10. Woodbury, Minnesota

Two small cities within the metropolitan halo of Boston made the cut: Newton and Brookline. In relation to the New York City region, only Union and Parsipanny/Troy Hills, NJ were on the list. Near Atlanta, we find the suburb of Alpharetta as a highly prized location (my mother lived there very happily in the last few years of her life). And the only selections in the entire state of California are Dublin, a city of 60,000 located 30 miles east of Oakland, and Eastvale, a city an hour east of downtown LA. Sorry, Hawaii and Alaska — you didn’t even make the top 50.

Anyway, here’s Money Magazine’s list of the best places to live in each state.

We can’t entirely live our lives according to the results from this kind of research, but such information can serve as a jumping off point for further exploration and can support us in doing our due diligence and making prudent choices.

Now For the Jobs per U.S. News

When considering relocation and where to settle down, other tools also come in handy. U.S. News & World Report’s “The 25 Best Jobs of 2018” can help us to piece the puzzle together. While software developer clinched the #1 spot for 2018, rest assured that healthcare jobs dominate the list, with the following health-related careers making appearances:

#2: Dentist
#3: Physician Assistant
#4: Nurse Practitioner
#5: Orthodontist
#7: Pediatrician
#8: A tie between Obstetrician/Gynecologist; Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon; & Physician
#11: Occupational Therapist
#12: Physical Therapist
#13: A tie between Anesthesiologist & Surgeon
#15: Psychiatrist
#16: Prosthodontist
#17: Dental Hygienist
#18: Registered Nurse
#20: Physical Therapy Assistant
#21: Respiratory Therapist
#22: Nurse Anesthetist
#23: Optometrist

If you’re thinking of switching out of healthcare entirely, see the list for the details, but rest assured that you’d do well as an actuary, marketing manager, statistician, or mathematician.

If you’re wondering about the difference between NPs, nurse anesthetists, and RNs, look no further:

Nurse Anesthetist
Median salary: $160,270
Unemployment rate: 2.7 percent

Nurse Practitioner
Median salary: $100,910
Unemployment rate: 0.7 percent

Registered Nurse
Median salary: $68,450
Unemployment rate: 1.2 percent

One thing we have no reliable data on is how much nurses are earning when they reach the PhD or DNP level, so the operative question remains whether pursuing those terminal nursing degrees repay the earnest (and highly indebted) nurse with high salaries and low unemployment.

Similarly, the Bureau of Labor Statistics also does nothing to parse these differences either. Don’t get me wrong, BLS data is a useful resource but doesn’t give us the full breakdown we truly need (likely because those BLS folks have no idea what a DNP is, and it’s even less likely that they even know what DNPs are capable of.)

The 25 Best Nursing Jobs

According to an article posted on TopRNtoBSN.com, nursing jobs of course have their own hierarchy of popularity and career mojo. Unfortunately, no methodology is shared, thus we’re left in the dark as to how they arrived at these conclusions. While the only hard statistics we’re given are median salaries, the list includes:

  1. Ambulatory Care Nurse
  2. Camp Nurse
  3. Case Management Nurse
  4. Correctional Nurse
  5. Flight Nurse
  6. Forensic Nurse
  7. Home Health Nurse
  8. Hospice Nurse
  9. Informatics Nurse
  10. IV Therapy Nurse
  11. International Nurse
  12. Long-Term Care Nurse
  13. Medical Supplies or Pharmaceutical Rep
  14. Nurse Advocate
  15. Nurse Educator
  16. Nurse Manager
  17. Nurse Researcher
  18. Psychiatric Nurse
  19. Public Health Nurse
  20. School Nurse
  21. Substance Abuse Nurse
  22. Telephone Triage Nurse
  23. Transplant Nurse
  24. Travel Nurse
  25. Wound, Ostomy, & Continence Nurse

You likely already noticed that many of the listed nursing jobs are removed from acute care, demonstrating to curious nurses that there is indeed life beyond the hospital (I’ve known this for decades, myself, but so many nurses seem unaware that any potential for work exists outside of the hospital milieu. Don’t get me started about those who say real nurses only work in hospitals!).

And remember that nurse entrepreneurs and other outside-the-box nurses (like myself) never get air time on mainstream healthcare and career websites.

Choose Your Own Adventure

Nursing offers varying entry points into the profession, with some students now choosing an entry-level MSN as their starting place, especially when coming from another professional career. That said, RN and BSN programs are still robust in terms of how many people are clamoring for admission, as are the many types of MSN and NP programs.

In essence, nursing is a “choose your own adventure” undertaking, with as yet many unknowns for each individual. Those unknowns may include the twists and turns of the economy; potential changes in healthcare reform and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the number of insured Americans; student loan program changes; as well as cost of living and other factors covered in the first half of this post.

Between cost of living, your family’s needs, potential salaries, and the lifestyle you prefer to lead, your choice of a nursing specialty and a place to put down roots is truly up to you. If you’re single or otherwise able to explore the country as a travel nurse, that could be one way of doing your research. Otherwise, networking, conversations, informational interviews, and deeper research is called for.

The possibilities are endless, nurses — do your due diligence and see what the roulette wheel of life and career hold in store for you.


Keith Carlson, RN, BSN, NC-BC, is the Board Certified Nurse Coach behind NurseKeith.com and the well-known nursing blog, Digital Doorway. Please visit his online platforms and reach out for his support when you need it most.

Keith is co-host of RNFMRadio.com, a wildly popular nursing podcast; he also hosts The Nurse Keith Show, his own podcast focused on career advice and inspiration for nurses.

A widely published nurse writer, Keith is the author of “Savvy Networking For Nurses: Getting Connected and Staying Connected in the 21st Century,” and has contributed chapters to a number of books related to the nursing profession. Keith has written for Nurse.com, Nurse.org, MultiViews News Service, LPNtoBSNOnline, StaffGarden, AusMed, American Sentinel University, the ANA blog, Working Nurse Magazine, and other online publications.

Mr. Carlson brings a plethora of experience as a nurse thought leader, online nurse personality, podcaster, holistic career coach, writer, and well-known successful nurse entrepreneur. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico with his lovely and talented wife, Mary Rives.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare Jobs Grow for the 95th Month in a Row

When it comes to jobs, the healthcare sector remains strong, accounting for 16.5% of the total jobs added in the U.S. in August.

The latest jobs report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has been released, and the good news continues for the 95th straight month for the healthcare sector. Healthcare jobs have grown, yet again, adding 33,200 jobs in August, accounting for 16.5% of the total jobs added in the U.S. in August. A robust number all its own, the growth seen in August is downright staggering when compared to July’s 16,700 new jobs, of which it is nearly double.

Ambulatory healthcare services accounted for the most employment growth within healthcare last month, adding 21,100 jobs. Other notable gains included hospitals, which added 8,200 jobs in August, as well as nursing and residential care facilities, which accounted for an additional 3,900 jobs.

In total, healthcare employment has increased by 301,000 jobs over the year, according to the BLS.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Where the Healthcare Jobs Are

What states are your best bet for finding a job in healthcare? We break down the places with the most openings, as well as popular positions in each.

Healthcare is, has been, and continues to be a booming industry in the United States. But what states, in particular, have the most available jobs? We analyzed job data on our site and came up with the three states with the most available openings in healthcare right now, as well as a selection of the popular position types available in each.

1. California

2. Texas

3. New York

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Here’s A Growing Job That Earns More Than $100K: The Nurse Technologist

Slowly but surely, technology is invading every workplace in America. Now it’s nursing’s turn.

from Forbes

Demand is growing rapidly for nurse informaticists, a role that combines traditional nursing with expertise in systems, analysis and design and has an average salary of more than $100,000. The explosion of tech in healthcare has spawned this surge in demand.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

8 Secrets to Landing a Locum Tenens Job

Here are a few insider tips and best practices that will help you throughout your locum tenens job search.

from KevinMD

Having worked as a locum tenens recruiter for over 15 years, I have seen consistent trends in how the best clinicians are able to stand out and book jobs. Especially now that there are tech-driven alternatives to agency recruiters, it’s more important than ever for providers to lead their own searches, present themselves in the best light possible, negotiate top pay rates, and ultimately win the positions they want.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Tips to Prove You’re the Best Fit for Any Healthcare Job

No matter the job you’re interviewing for, you’re likely to be asked why you’re a good fit for the position.

by Eileen O’Shanassy

No matter the job you’re interviewing for, you’re likely to be asked why you’re a good fit for the position. Health care professionals are no stranger to this routine question, and those who know how to answer this question enjoy better opportunities than their peers, and are more likely to find jobs for which they’re well-suited to. This field requires a very special skill set, and demonstrating that you have those skills is crucial during the interview process. Here are five ways to demonstrate you’re a good fit for the job at hand. 

Show That You’re Personable

Being personable is absolutely essential in the health care field. Often called bedside manner, the way you interact with patients, their families, and other medical professionals will be a key factor in your ability to get and keep jobs. Be friendly, open, and courteous during your interview. Address tough questions with poise and confidence and make sure you connect on a personal level during the interview. Doing so demonstrates you’ll be able to handle difficult situations with patients, families, and your colleagues. 

Demonstrate Your Flexibility

Medical, laboratory, and dental facilities are ever-changing environments where new challenges are thrown your way every day. If you’re stuck in one pattern of behavior, or can only find one way to solve a problem, employers are unlikely to hire you. Show that you’re willing and able to use your problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to challenges with which you’re presented. Letting your interviewer know that you can adapt to diverse environments and learn new things is important. In an interview setting you can do this by using hypothetical problems, and highlighting past experiences where you solved a problem.

Use Your Communication Skills

In health care settings, good communication can actually mean the difference between life and death. Be sure to put all of your communications skills on display during your interview. Show that you know how to communicate with people from an array of backgrounds, and that you’re able to remain professional and friendly no matter what comes your way. Communicate with the proper technical terms and be sure to include different ways you’ve communicated through technology. Think of examples in your professional life where you’ve had to use strong communication skills, and be prepared to share them with your interviewer. 

Be Clear About How Your Training Matches the Job

Before you head into your interview, identify all training and licenses you possess that match the demands of the job. It’s important to show your interviewer you have relevant training and that you’ve demonstrated your ability to use a given skill set on a previous job or during your schooling. Remember that it’s also important to be candid if you are lacking any training that might be needed for the job. Many employers are willing to provide training for promising job candidates. You can also offer to become trained in programs like Integrity Support or other IT programs the clinic might already use. This is a great way to show your dedication right off the bat.

Show That You Know How to Remain Calm

Many health care jobs are in a high-pressure environment, and knowing how to stay calm during an emergency or crisis is essential. Think about past jobs or experiences where you’ve had to show grace under pressure, and be ready to talk about them with your interviewer. Staying calm and collected during your interview is also a great way to demonstrate this skill. If you don’t get flustered when you’re asked tough questions, your interviewer will likely assume you’ll bring the same poise to the workplace. 

Remember, knowing you’re a good fit before you go into an interview is crucial to both your success and your long-term happiness. Carefully read any job postings to which you respond. If you are lacking more than one or two of the expected skills and traits, find job openings that better meet your skills and talents. Doing so will allow you to gain valuable work experience while providing you the opportunity to acquire the right skills to land that dream job in the future. 


Eileen O’Shanassy is a freelance writer and blogger based out of Flagstaff, AZ. She writes on a variety of topics and loves to research and write. She enjoys baking, biking, and kayaking. Check out her Twitter, @eileenoshanassy.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

New Health Care Opportunities Continue for Nurse Practitioners, Physicians

“Jobs at the top end, like doctors, surgeons, specialists, highly qualified nurses, physician assistants and others, will continue to be in demand for years.”

from The Chicago Tribune

“While it’s true that there are numerous jobs in health care that will be in demand for years, if not decades, because of an aging community, people often overlook jobs because they focus on the inner workings of hospitals and medical facilities — the technologists, the assistants, the technicians,” says Joan Stanley, analyst for the U.S. Department of Labor. “Jobs at the top end, like doctors, surgeons, specialists, highly qualified nurses, physician assistants and others, will continue to be in demand for years.”

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