These Are the Best Healthcare Jobs in America

Healthcare professionals have received a lot of praise over the last year, often being lauded as heroes. But which healthcare jobs ranked as the best?

Those who work in healthcare have always known how essential their jobs are. The rest of the world learned this in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold and forever changed the way the healthcare profession will be viewed by the general public. Physicians and Registered Nurses, in particular, were heaped with praise, becoming the heroes of our nation and the world.

But which healthcare jobs are best? Not the most celebrated or well-recognized, but the best—best for salary, work-life balance, stress level, the job market, and future growth. U.S. News & World Report released their annual rankings based on these very metrics. The 20 best healthcare jobs according to their findings are listed below.

1. Physician Assistant

Overall Score: 8.3 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.4/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $112,260
Other Rankings: #1 in 100 Best Jobs, #1 in Best STEM Jobs
Search Physician Assistant Jobs →

2. Nurse Practitioner

Overall Score: 8.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 10/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $109,820
Other Rankings: #3 in 100 Best Jobs, #3 in Best STEM Jobs
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3. Physician

Overall Score: 7.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $206,500
Other Rankings: #5 in 100 Best Jobs, #8 in Best Paying Jobs
Search Physician Jobs →

4. Speech-Language Pathologist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $79,120
Other Rankings: #7 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Speech-Language Pathologist Jobs →

5. Dentist

Overall Score: 7.5 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 9.9/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $155,600
Other Rankings: #7 in Best STEM Jobs, #9 in 100 Best Jobs, #11 in Best Paying Jobs
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6. Veterinarian

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.7/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 9/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $95,460
Other Rankings: #10 in 100 Best Jobs
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7. Orthodontist

Overall Score: 7.4 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 8/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #5 in Best Paying Jobs, #8 in Best STEM Jobs, #11 in 100 Best Jobs
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8. Anesthesiologist

Overall Score: 7.2 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #1 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in 100 Best Jobs
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9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #3 in Best Paying Jobs, #18 in 100 Best Jobs
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10. Occupational Therapist

Overall Score: 7.0 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.3/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $84,950
Other Rankings: #19 in 100 Best Jobs
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11. Physical Therapist

Overall Score: 6.9 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 7.5/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $89,440
Other Rankings: #21 in 100 Best Jobs
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12. Psychiatrist

Overall Score: 6.8 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 6/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #7 in Best Paying Jobs, #27 in 100 Best Jobs
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13. Prosthodontist

Overall Score: 6.7 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #6 in Best Paying Jobs, #35 in 100 Best Jobs
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14. Registered Nurse

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.8/10, Job Market 8/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $73,300
Other Rankings: #37 in 100 Best Jobs
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15. Nurse Anesthetist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Future Growth 4/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $174,790
Other Rankings: #10 in Best Paying Jobs, #14 in Best STEM Jobs, #39 in 100 Best Jobs
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16. Obstetrician and Gynecologist — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 6/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 4/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #4 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Obstetrician and Gynecologist Jobs →

16. Surgeon — Tie

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 10/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 2/10, Work Life Balance 2/10
Median Salary: $208,000
Other Rankings: #2 in Best Paying Jobs, #42 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Surgeon Jobs →

18. Chiropractor

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 6.6/10, Job Market 10/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 4/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $70,340
Other Rankings: #44 in 100 Best Jobs
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19. Podiatrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.9/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 6/10
Median Salary: $126,240
Other Rankings: #18 in Best Paying Jobs, #46 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Podiatrist Jobs →

20. Optometrist

Overall Score: 6.6 out of 10
Score Breakdown: Salary 8.5/10, Future Growth 8/10, Stress 6/10, Work Life Balance 8/10
Median Salary: $115,250
Other Rankings: #22 in Best Paying Jobs, #48 in 100 Best Jobs
Search Optometrist Jobs →

How do you feel about the rankings? Does your job seem like it’s the “best”? The worst? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Get Your Résumé Ready for the New Year

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

If your New Year’s Resolution includes finding a new job—a resolution that landed on a list of the most popular resolutions for 2021—now is the time to get your résumé in prime shape. While hiring was obviously impacted in many ways over the course of 2020, traditionally, hiring ramps big time once the calendar rolls over into January. If you are seeking a change for the year ahead, here are the three most important things you can do to get your résumé ready for your 2021 job search.

New Year, New Look

The New Year, for many, is often time for a bold change, and your résumé should be no exception. Start out by updating the look and feel of your résumé. Your goal should be to have a résumé that is easy to follow and one that instantly reflects who you are and what you can do. Some quick tips for giving your résumé a makeover include:

  • Start with an easy-to-follow, modern template that has clearly defined sections of information. Some great examples of résumés like these can be found here, here, and here.
  • Identify and use a tagline for yourself. You aren’t just a nurse or a doctor. “NICU RN-BSN, BLS and ACLS Certified” or “Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician” tucked beneath your name at the top of your résumé affords the reader insight into your qualifications before they even really begin to dig into your document.
  • Update your contact information to current standards. Listing your mailing address is less important these days than linking to your online social profiles. Include, at a minimum, a URL for your LinkedIn account, and any other professionally acceptable social accounts you may hold. Also, be sure to include your email address, but only if it’s one that can be taken seriously, and not something like GlitterSparkleButterfly@whatever.com.
  • Throw out the old objective section in favor of a short, professional summary, and stock it with your most impressive qualifications and accomplishments, which you should then expand upon in your experience and education sections.

Take Stock of 2020

Now that your résumé has a new look for the new year, the content will need updating, as well. With 2020 firmly in the rearview, take time to reflect on all that happened over the course of the year. What did you accomplish? What new skills did you learn? Did you gain any new certifications or degrees? Did you receive any special recognition? Did you take on any new responsibilities?

Also, and probably most importantly, take the time to reflect on what you truly want out of 2021 and beyond. If 2020 taught us anything, it is that time is precious. You should spend your time doing what you love, and your résumé should position you to find a job that fits into that—not just a job that you fit into.

Look back on where the previous year has taken you, and then update the appropriate sections of your résumé to reflect any worthwhile highlights. You will also want to trim the fat, so to speak, from previous years, if there is anything listed that is no longer relevant or has become less impressive over time.

Lastly, take note of keywords that are frequently used in the job postings you have been browsing and make sure you include as many of them as possible in the text of your résumé. Doing so will increase your odds of being labeled as a match for the jobs to which you plan to apply.

Get Online

If you are like the bulk of the population, you will likely be applying to jobs online in 2021, be it on our site or elsewhere, making the online version of your résumé just as important as the paper copy you will bring with you when you go in to interview for said jobs. Make sure you upload your updated résumé to our site and any others you may be using to browse for jobs, and also take the time to revamp your LinkedIn profile to match your reworked résumé, and update any other social accounts you plan to disclose to potential employers (or lock down the ones you don’t plan to share via privacy preferences).

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

What Healthcare’s Heroes Are Giving Thanks for This Year

“What are you thankful for?” we asked, and you answered. Here’s what healthcare professionals are most thankful for in this year like no other.

What are you thankful for?

The question may seem simple, but, for many, we know it is not simple at all.

2020 has been a year that has brought about tremendous uncertainty, and one that has caused so many to face unthinkable circumstances, particularly those who work in healthcare. You have seen some truly harrowing things this year, have been asked to reach even further past your burnout, to save this nation. You have been called heroes, and rightly so.

And, for some, given all you’ve endured, it is almost hard to fathom that there has been anything good in this year. That there have been victories and triumphs. That hope lives on.

But no matter what situation this year has found you in, we promise you, there are still things to be thankful for. Even if it is just the breath in your lungs or the dawn of a new day. Small miracles are miracles all the same, and there are always reasons to be thankful.

“What are you thankful for?” we asked, and you answered. Here’s what healthcare professionals are most thankful for this year.

“I’m grieving, but I’m grateful. We, as a country, and as an industry, have lost so much. We have been through so much. But this year has taught me to take nothing for granted, and in a weird, terrible way, I’m thankful for that.”
— Alexis M., Nurse Practitioner


“I am thankful for the fellow healthcare workers who took care of my daughter while she was being diagnosed with a rare lung disease during a time when they were already taxed and tired. [And] I’m thankful to be one of the most accessible healthcare workers during a time when many patients could not access their primary care teams.”
— Michelle H., Pharmacist


“Honestly, I’m not thankful for much. But I am thankful to be alive. After losing patients and coworkers to the virus, that’s definitely something to be grateful for. I am still here, and I am thankful for that.”
— Brian O., Registered Nurse


“I’m thankful for my knowledge, my passion, and my strength, which have enabled me to be there for my patients during this very hard year.”
— Jennifer R., Licensed Practical Nurse


“Let’s cut right to the chase: I’m thankful for science, and I’m not very thankful for those who have denied it this year.”
— David S., Physician


“Each day is a gift, life is fragile.”
— Marie S., Cardiology/EKG Technician


“Health, family, being able to keep working.”
— Pedro C., Physician


“I am thankful for my family, for keeping my spirits up and for being there for me always, and that goes for my work family, too.”
— Jessica J., Registered Nurse


“I’m just thankful to still have a job. I know a lot of people can’t say that right now.”
— Megan T., Medical Billing Specialist


“[I’m thankful] that the healthcare field is always and will always be there when needed. I’m grateful to be in such a powerful sector that has come through time and time again for the public. I’m thankful for being a healthcare worker.”
— Loretta I., Mental Health Associate


“That after 44 years as a nurse, 42 years being in surgery, my family when we celebrated my retirement made me realize that everyday I made a difference in someones life. I didn’t just go to an office and help my boss or company make money.”
— Linda W., Registered Nurse


“I’m thankful for my faith, my family, and my life. This year. Always.”
— Heather G., Speech-Language Pathologist


No matter what this year has found you thankful for, please know that all of us here at HealthJobsNationwide.com are profoundly thankful for you. Wishing you and yours a safe and happy Thanksgiving.
Most Sincerely,
The HealthJobsNationwide.com Team

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Healthcare’s Spookiest Jobs

From those who draw blood with the ease of a vampire, to those who stalk the halls of hospitals in the dark of night, healthcare is full of spooky jobs.

Halloween is upon us. A time when regular folks break out the blood and guts for decoration. For some healthcare workers, though, blood and guts can be the makings of a normal workday.

From those who draw blood with the ease of a vampire, to those who stalk the halls of hospitals in the dark of night, healthcare is full of jobs that can give the average ghoul or goblin a fright. So, we’ve compiled a list of healthcare’s spookiest jobs, ranked in no particular order—because, let’s be real, it’s 2020 and everything is pretty spooky right about now.

? Phlebotomists

Why So Spooky: Blood. That’s about it. Because of blood, and the fact that phlebotomists willingly and easily remove blood from the bodies of living human beings. If that doesn’t give you the chills, you might want to check yourself for a pulse.

? Pathologists

Why So Spooky: Pathologists closely examine a body’s organs, tissues, body fluids, cells, and molecules—also known as, ya know, guts. Bonus spooky points for forensic pathologists, in particular, because they do all of that with dead bodies. If we ever have a zombie outbreak, we’re counting on you fine folks to sort it out.

? Forensic Scientists

Why So Spooky: Speaking of dead bodies. Forensic scientists work with law enforcement to analyze evidence and investigate crimes. Crimes like murder. They can also be experts in things like bloodstain pattern analysis and body identification, so there’s certainly no shortage of spooky here.

? Nocturnists & Night-Shift Nurses

Why So Spooky: Things that go bump in the night—like a physician stalking the halls of the hospital at all hours of the night. Because that’s their job. They work overnight. Also, not to be forgotten, night-shift nurses. Particularly on nights that have full moons. When they work in the ER. If you know, you know.

? Medical Waste Disposal Technicians

Why So Spooky: There are four types of medical waste: general, infectious, hazardous, and radioactive. That includes bodily fluids. And used syringes. And radioactive waste. And someone has to be the person to make that stuff disappear. Sounds like a horror film waiting to happen, doesn’t it? Particularly, if something goes wrong with that radioactive waste.

? Correctional Medicine

Why So Spooky: It takes a special kind of nurse, advanced practitioner, or physician to clock in at the clink, surrounded by any number violent criminals, including murderers, who could easily be the inspiration for a slasher film. And though those criminals obviously need medical care, too, it’s not likely they’re fans of the Hippocratic Oath, having done harm to others. That’ll give you a fright, for sure.

? Honorable Mention: Every Other Healthcare Job

Why So Spooky: Because, again, it’s 2020. And we’re seven long months into a global pandemic with no real end in sight. Maybe some nice witch will spend their Halloween breaking the collective curse we’re all under, though, and things will be okay again soon. Fingers crossed.

From your friends at HealthJobsNationwide.com, we wish you many treats and zero tricks this year. And if you’ll be working this Halloween (when there will be a full moon (while Mercury is in retrograde (in, ya know, the year 2020))), we wish you the absolute best of luck. Stay safe out there.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

3 States with the Most Demand for Healthcare Professionals

The healthcare industry added more than a quarter million jobs during July, August, and September. Where is demand the greatest?

The healthcare workforce, like virtually every other industry, was greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, seeing staggering job losses as the virus—and the economic fallout associated with it—swept the nation. However, due to the ongoing pandemic, healthcare professionals are obviously essential in a way that most other workers currently are not, and hiring remains steady, with the healthcare industry adding back more than 250,000 jobs during July, August, and September.

Where is the demand for healthcare professionals the greatest, though? We analyzed data from our jobs website to determine what states currently have the highest inventory of openings. Here are the top three states where healthcare professionals are needed most.

1. California

Number of Openings in California: 6,665

Noteworthy Openings in California:

Click Here to Search Healthcare Jobs in California →

2. Texas

Number of Openings in Texas: 2,726

Noteworthy Openings in Texas:

Click Here to Search Healthcare Jobs in Texas →

3. Pennsylvania

Number of Openings in Pennsylvania: 2,368

Noteworthy Openings in Pennsylvania:

Click Here to Search Healthcare Jobs in Pennsylvania →

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How Healthcare Workers with Children Are Coping During the Pandemic

Parenting is hard. Parenting as a healthcare worker during a pandemic is even harder. These 7 strategies can help your family cope with coronavirus.

by Deborah Swanson

Juggling healthcare work with parenting was already a challenge in the best of times, and the pandemic has made everything 10 times harder. Now providers worry about bringing the virus home to their kids while simultaneously managing unprecedented situations at work. If you’re a healthcare worker with kids, here are seven suggestions for coping with the ongoing pandemic.

Consider Your Risk Factors

Not every healthcare worker is exposed equally to coronavirus. Likewise, not every healthcare worker is equally vulnerable or has a family member who’s equally vulnerable to the disease. If your line of work doesn’t bring you into contact with infectious patients that much, and no one in your family is high risk, you might be able to continue seeing your family as long as you wear proper protective gear at work, wash your hands often and clean yourself as soon as you get home. However, if you’re working directly with COVID patients, or your spouse and/or your kids are at a higher risk, it’s worth taking extra precautions and considering how much exposure you and your family are comfortable with.

Get Partners and Family Members Involved

If you’re raising your kids with a partner, both of you should talk about your comfort levels and exactly what risks you’ll be running at work. If you decide to self-isolate from your family (more on how to do this below), your partner will also have to take on more housework and childcare, so that’s a conversation that you need to have together. You might also want to turn to parents or in-laws for child assistance if they live nearby, but, again, you need to evaluate the risk factors. Grandparents are likely to be older and thus at a higher risk, and if you see your kids at home and then your spouse drops them off at grandma’s, the kids could transmit the infection even if they don’t have symptoms. If your spouse can’t watch the kids in your stead—maybe you both work in healthcare—it might be wise to temporarily have your kids stay with another relative.

Consider Self-Quarantining

If you don’t have people in the area that your kids can stay with, and you know you’ll be exposed to infectious patients, it might be best to self-isolate from the others in your household. This means sleeping in a separate room, using a separate bathroom and avoiding common areas such as the kitchen and living room. Your partner can bring meals to you and then take the dishes away. In some hotspots, hotels and other rentals are also offering rooms for free or cheap to healthcare workers who are exposing themselves to the virus and don’t feel comfortable staying at home. While it’s tough to be separated from their families, for many, it’s worth the peace of mind so they don’t have to fret about whether or not they have infected their partner or children.

Talk with Your Kids About COVID-19

In addition to talking with your partner, you should also talk with your kids about the coronavirus pandemic and what it means. Obviously, you want to go into an appropriate amount of detail for their age range. A good first step can be asking them what they know and what questions they have about coronavirus. Talk to them about how the virus spreads and what they can personally do to help keep themselves safe (i.e., washing their hands). Try to limit their exposure to the news. There’s no need to worry them unduly. If you will be isolating from them or otherwise changing your routine because of your healthcare job, explain to them why you’re doing what you’re doing.

Take Advantage of Technology

Whether or not you choose to self-isolate from your family, technology will play a big role in keeping you connected to both your nuclear and extended family, as well as friends and other loved ones scattered around the world. You might need to help older relatives figure out call technology so they can chat with the grandkids, and you can show your kids how to use their devices to keep in touch with their friends virtually. It’s not the same as being together in person, but these virtual connections can make you and your kids feel less alone as social distancing wears on.

Follow Best Sanitation Practices

Your hospital has probably put out guidelines explaining best sanitation practices for your department when it comes to reducing coronavirus transmission. Be sure to follow these guidelines, which includes donning proper PPE, washing your hands regularly and wearing a mask at all times. Some healthcare workers are also taking additional steps, such as changing at work and bringing home their worn cotton scrubs in a sealed bag. Many also leave their shoes at the door of their house (which you should be doing anyway), disrobe as soon as they get inside and wash all their clothes on the hottest possible cycle while they take a shower. Don’t forget to disinfect any devices, like your cell phone or pager, as well to help keep your family safe.

Have an Emergency Plan in Place

Regardless of what you decide to do, you need to have a game plan in place in case you, your partner or one of your kids start exhibiting symptoms that are in line with coronavirus. You should know which doctors to call, where to get tested and what you will do if the test comes back either positive or negative. You might also find it helpful to keep a “go bag” packed in case you need to suddenly self-isolate or head to the hospital. Hopefully, you’ll never have to put the plan into action, but laying it all out ahead of time will greatly reduce your stress and panic if worst comes to worst.

Parenting is hard, parenting during a pandemic is harder and parenting as a healthcare worker during a pandemic might be the hardest of all. Follow these seven strategies to help your family cope with coronavirus.


Deborah Swanson is a Coordinator for the Real Caregivers Program at allheart.com, a site dedicated to celebrating medical professionals and their journeys. When she isn’t interviewing caregivers and writing about them, she’s gardening.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

6 Ways Healthcare Is Adapting to Handle Future Crises

From relying less on federal leadership to making government funding more flexible, discover what the healthcare world might look like post-coronavirus.

by Deborah Swanson

The coronavirus pandemic has upended the world, and it’s affected the healthcare system in a big way. At this point, it doesn’t seem like we’ll ever go back to the way things were before the pandemic, and both individuals and agencies are already planning for the new future. The coronavirus exposed tons of weaknesses in the healthcare system. As a result, many healthcare organizations are thinking hard about how they can better prepare for the next crisis.

Here are six strategies that the healthcare industry might implement, from relying more heavily on regional (vs. federal) leadership to making government funding more flexible. Discover what the healthcare world might look like post-coronavirus:

Leadership Will Emerge on a Regional Level

This trend has already shown itself just in the past few months. Given the conflicting messages from federal leaders and the high variability of the virus across different geographic areas, leadership has emerged on a state and even county level. Governors have worked together across state lines, while mayors have directed their cities’ reopening plans independent of other officials. While this patchwork of leadership can be hard to follow, it does allow for a more tailored approach. This regional-specific approach is necessary because the virus has hit some places harder than others. Expect to see regional and local leaders continue to take charge.

New Types of Care Centers Might Emerge

The pandemic has highlighted hospitals’ vulnerabilities and how both patients and healthcare workers might benefit from alternative care delivery centers. Unless coronavirus patients cannot breathe on their own, they’ve been told to stay away from hospitals and clinics, leaving many very sick people laid up at home. There’s simply nowhere else for sick people to go, and many hospitals are full. Skilled nursing facilities dedicated to coronavirus patients who don’t need the ICU (but would benefit from experts in stretch scrubs) could cut down on infectious transmissions and speed recoveries for moderately acute patients.

Telehealth Is Here to Stay

While some healthcare systems have been quietly implementing telehealth for years, it wasn’t the norm everywhere, and insurance didn’t always cover it. But coronavirus changed everything when care systems across the world eliminated all but the most essential in-person visits. While some of these measures (and the accompanying insurance coverage) were only temporary fixes, the coronavirus will likely turn telehealth services into a fixture of the healthcare landscape. Whether it’s an infectious disease or a natural disaster that causes people to relocate, telehealth connects patients to their providers from a safe distance. Expect telehealth to become more sophisticated as healthcare systems build on their last-minute coronavirus fixes.

Some Workers Might Stay Remote

Some healthcare interactions, like surgeries, simply have to take place in person. But you might see more and more healthcare employees working remotely if they don’t have to be in the clinic physically. This shift is especially true for administrative roles. Even providers might shift more of their patient load to telehealth appointments and only don their cotton scrubs or nursing shoes in-person a few days per week. While the world is changing daily, it’s safe to say that this trend isn’t going anywhere for the time being.

Information Sharing Will Be Widespread

Healthcare is traditionally a slow-moving, siloed industry. Not all that long ago, records were kept on physical papers that had to be faxed back and forth between offices. While hospitals were slowly getting on the digital bandwagon, the coronavirus has kicked these changes into overdrive. Healthcare teams are collaborating across state lines and even national borders to find a vaccine for COVID-19. Meanwhile, digital records are becoming the norm, allowing patients and providers to access them from different locations. And once a vaccine becomes available, this information sharing will need to increase, so offices across state lines can confirm that their patients have indeed received the shots.

Government Funding Might Become More Flexible

Speaking of siloes, it’s hard to find an area in healthcare that’s more separated and confusing than government funding. Right now, every program and department have their own financial regulatory rules. As a result, some states and grant recipients must puzzle their way through a labyrinth of regulations. However, the coronavirus pandemic is slowly but surely forcing agencies to develop ways to work together and streamline their processes. In fact, the federal government has already created a disaster response toolkit that advises states on managing Medicaid and other services during crises like pandemics and natural disasters. While this change will be slow-moving, we will likely see more cohesion as everyone tries to navigate the post-pandemic environment.

The healthcare industry is already feeling the pandemic’s effects, and changes will continue to come as healthcare evolves. Look out for these six changes as the healthcare industry tries to navigate the new normal.


Deborah Swanson is a Coordinator for the Real Caregivers Program at allheart.com, a site dedicated to celebrating medical professionals and their journeys. When she isn’t interviewing caregivers and writing about them, she’s gardening.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How to Cope When You Hate Your Job

Working in healthcare is just plain hard. So, how do you cope if and when your passion for it seems gone? Here are some things to try.

Even without the added pressure of a pandemic, working in healthcare is just plain hard. On any given day, it can be mentally, emotionally, or physically exhausting—on its worst day, a combination of all three—and the reasons you found yourself wanting to work in the field may be long forgotten, replaced with resentment and regret. So, how do you cope, when you no longer love your job? Here are five ideas to try.

Identify What You Dislike

You cannot fix a problem, unless you know what the problem is. It’s easy to say, “I hate my job,” but, surely, you don’t hate everything about it. Take a hard look at what is plaguing you. What is it that is burning you out? Is it the volume of your workload? An ornery coworker? The things you see in your specialty? Talk it through with yourself, a friend or partner, or a mental health professional, so you can truly identify where the problem lies and develop a plan to remedy the problem. It might be an easier fix than you think.

Remind Yourself Why You Chose Your Job

The power of positive thinking doesn’t fix everything, but it can certainly help. When you are feeling particularly down about your job, it might do you some good to remember why you chose your career path. If you were motivated to go into healthcare to help people, as most are, you are still helping people, even on your bad days. It’s easy to lose sight of the good, when buried beneath the bad—dig out by remembering the real, tangible, positive impact your career makes on lives every day.

Find a Battle Buddy

The buddy system might be something you haven’t thought about since grade school, but it is something that the U.S. military has used for years to increase morale, improve safety, promote problem-solving, and even prevent suicide. Battle buddies, as they are known in the military, can be beneficial in healthcare, as well. If you don’t already have a coworker you can vent to and with, make it your mission to find one. Talk things through on a regular basis, as a way to decompress and let go of negative feelings, and to also bond with your battle buddy, and allow them to do the same.

Give Yourself Something to Look Forward To

Though you may work long hours, you are not always on the clock. Make sure you spend your time outside of work mentally clocked out, as well. Fill your schedule with things you enjoy, be they socially distant time with friends and family, any number of hobbies, or even just a day in bed with your favorite TV show on the big screen. Or, better yet, reward yourself by planning a vacation. Either way, give yourself something to look forward to outside of work to get you through the day. Even if it’s something small, it may be the boost you need to make the hours tick by a little bit faster.

Look for a New Job

If all else fails, know that the role you are currently in is not the only one of its kind on the planet. Luckily, if you’re reading this article, you’re already on a healthcare job board. Take a look and see what else is out there. Who knows, you might end up in a job you just plain love.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

10 Healthcare Roles Top Riskiest List

In what may come as a surprise to very few, the top ten riskiest jobs in terms of possible COVID-19 exposure are patient-facing roles in healthcare.

In what may come as a surprise to very few, of the 100 riskiest occupations in terms of exposure to COVID-19, the top ten riskiest jobs are patient-facing roles in healthcare.

Though no federal or U.S. state governments have released occupational data as it pertains to COVID-19 deaths, we were able to use the COVID-19 Occupational Risk Score to rank which roles may make people more susceptible to contracting the virus. The COVID-19 Occupational Risk Score, which was developed by Visual Capitalist and the World Economic Forum, scores occupations based on data from the U.S. Labor Department’s O*NET Database. Data points examined to determine risk include how often one is exposed to diseases and infections in their job, one’s proximity to other human beings while at work on a daily basis, whether or not there is regular direct contact with the general population, and more.

Of the ten jobs ranked as being of the highest risk during the pandemic, the riskiest job, with a near-maximum risk score of 99.7, went to Dental Hygienists. Trailing closely behind, the second riskiest job, as identified by the analysis, was Respiratory Therapy Technicians, with a risk score of 95.0. Registered Nurses—who have often been seen by many as the face of healthcare’s frontlines—ranked as the seventh riskiest position, with a risk score of 86.1.

Here are the top ten riskiest positions, as well as their COVID-19 Risk Scores:

  1. Dental Hygienists, 99.7
  2. Respiratory Therapy Technicians, 95.0
  3. Dental Assistants, 92.5
  4. Dentists, General, 92.1
  5. Orderlies (Patient Care Assistants), 90.2
  6. Family and General Practitioners, 90.1
  7. Registered Nurses, 86.1
  8. Respiratory Therapists, 84.2
  9. Radiologic Technicians, 84.1
  10. Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses, 82.1

Not in the top ten? If you want to find out if and where your position ranked, click here to see the top 100 riskiest jobs.

Do you feel the rankings are accurate? Tell us in the comments below.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Survey: How Do You Feel About COVID-19 Now?

Around the country, as more and more restrictions have been lifted, cases of COVID-19 are skyrocketing. How do you, as a healthcare professional, feel about COVID-19 now?

Around the country, as more and more restrictions have been lifted, cases of COVID-19 are skyrocketing, to the point where Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, is warning that the nation could see 100,000 new cases per day. Despite this, a dangerously large amount of the American population appears to be going about life as normal—their faces unmasked, and the pandemic all but forgotten.

And then there are the healthcare professionals—those who are working tirelessly, with their masks firmly affixed to their faces, to help stem the pandemic as it continues to rage on.

As healthcare professionals, we wanted to gauge your thoughts on what is currently happening around the nation in regards to the pandemic and how seriously, or not seriously, people seem to be taking it. Tell us below.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.