The Drones are Coming

Access to healthcare saw great progress this past week, with the first residential deliveries of prescriptions via autonomous drone.

It sounds like the future, but it’s happening now: prescriptions delivered via drone.

On November 1st, CVS Pharmacy and UPS’s Flight Forward subsidiary successfully used drones to deliver prescriptions to the homes of customers for the very first time.

The drone, which was developed by Matternet, departed on its inaugural flight from a CVS store in Cary, North Carolina and flew to two customers’ homes, where it then hovered about 20 feet over the ground and slowly lowered the packages to the ground via a cable and winch. One of the packages was delivered to a CVS customer with limited mobility, which makes it difficult for them to travel to a store to pick up a prescription—exactly the sort to customer CVS and UPS had in mind while getting into the drone delivery business.

“This drone delivery, the first of its kind in the industry, demonstrates what’s possible for our customers who can’t easily make it into our stores,” said Kevin Hourican, president of CVS Pharmacy, in a press release. “CVS is exploring many types of delivery options for urban, suburban and rural markets. We see big potential in drone delivery in rural communities where life-saving medications are needed and consumers at times cannot conveniently access one of our stores.”

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

4 Technologies to Know About for Your Clinic

Keeping up with the latest technology is vital for the success of your clinic. Here are four to know about to help you innovate.

By Lizzie Weakley

Keeping up with the latest technology is vital for the success of your clinic. As the healthcare landscape becomes more competitive, having advanced equipment can attract new patients and retain current ones. Technological innovations can also make your clinic more efficient by reducing diagnosis and treatment time. Here are four technologies to consider adding to your practice today.

Advanced Ultrasound Machines

Ultrasound is a safe, effective and non-invasive way to view internal parts of the body. However, the most well-known use of ultrasound is during prenatal exams to check the health of the fetus and give the parents a first look at their new baby. Adding advanced ultrasound technology, such as 3D and 4D ultrasounds, to your practice can not only improve diagnostic capabilities but also bring in revenue from expecting parents who are willing to pay extra for more detailed images.

Thermal Imaging

The use of a thermal camera to diagnose and monitor certain medical condition is one of the biggest recent advancements in healthcare. Unlike many other imaging technologies, thermal imaging is completely safe and painless with no radiation exposure. This technology is often used to help detect breast cancer by measuring the heat signatures produced by the blood vessels surrounding a tumor.

MelaFind Scanner

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. While the aggressive type called melanoma only accounts for one percent of these cancers, it is responsible for the majority of skin cancer deaths. A non-invasive optical scanning technology known as MelaFind may revolutionize the early detection of this deadly cancer and reduce the need for painful biopsies. MelaFind is an easy-to-use handheld device that can analyze moles and lesions deep below the skin.

Telemedicine

Many people find it difficult to fit doctor appointments into their busy schedules. Telemedicine is a great way to reach these patients and help them manage their health more effectively. Conducting appointments via video conference allows patients to be seen and treated from their home, office or on the go. Another use of telemedicine is robotic technology in hospitals. Robot nurses equipped with video can check in on patients and free up staff for more important tasks.

Remember, just having advanced technology in your clinic isn’t enough. You must also invest in experienced, well-trained staff who can put that technology to use. Many advanced pieces of medical equipment require special training in order to use them effectively. Don’t forget to budget for training and new hires when considering a technology upgrade.


Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio. In her free time, she enjoys the outdoors and walks in the park with her husky, Snowball.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Tech Startups Zero in On Healthcare

Y Combinator’s Demo Day saw the launch of giants such as Dropbox and Airbnb, and now a quarter of this year’s featured tech startups fall into the bio space, including healthcare.

Venture capitalists who attended Y Combinator’s Demo Day, the twice-annual event that showcases emerging technology startups, are increasingly turning their attention to the healthcare space, according to coverage of the event by Wired.

Demo Day, which took place from August 20th to the 22nd at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, showcases graduates and of Y Combinator’s prominent training program to investors, looking to get in on the ground floor of the next Dropbox or Airbnb, both of which began at Y Combinator.

A quarter of the 142 companies presenting at Demo Day fell into the Bio category, which includes healthcare and biotech—the largest percentage since Demo Day began.

To read Wired’s article, including their highlights of noteworthy bio startups that presented at Demo Day this year, click here.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How Tech Can Undo Physician Burnout from EHRs

Solutions should reduce the burden of repetitive data input that now takes place and enable seamless ways for clinicians to talk to each other, experts say.

from HealthcareITNews

The widespread frustration felt by doctors wrangling with kludgy interfaces, interminable sign-ins and so many clicks is well-trodden at this point. Perhaps less understood, however, is how technologies including EHRs can be tuned to make physicians more efficient — and more happy.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

New Project Has Long-term Goal: Unleash New Era of Patient Care

With the AMA’s Integrated Health Model Initiative, health care and technology stakeholders can work together to address data needs around costly and burdensome areas such as hypertension, diabetes, and asthma.

from AMA Wire

The health data available to physicians and health systems are too often not enough to provide a complete picture of each patient. For example, information about an asthma patient’s family support, goals, risk factors and lifestyle can make all the difference when it comes to designing the optimal treatment plan that allows the patient to take an active role in their care and achieve better outcomes. This patient-contributed data could also relieve some of the data-entry burden borne by the health care team.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Let’s Stop Blaming Hospitals for Every Security Breach

Yes, health entities need to be held responsible for protecting patient data but public shaming isn’t making that happen. There’s a better way forward.

from HealthcareITNews

I stepped into the Healthcare Security Forum this week in Boston hoping to walk away with perhaps a few nuggets of optimism, even small ones. That didn’t exactly happen but, instead, a new message emerged: the conversation about how cybersecurity is so negative that it only triggers tension and hostility among infosec pros, executives and end users.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Natural Disasters Make Strong Case for EHRs

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and the devastation they have brought with them, serve as glaring reminders for how beneficial EHRs can be in a crisis. Is your hospital prepared?

Though the implementation of electronic health records has come with its problems and has had its share of critics in our hospitals and health systems, many studies have highlighted their benefits, including improved access to and organization of patient data, providing the ability to make more timely decisions regarding care, improved communication and care coordination, a reduction in clerical tasks, and more.

However, one benefit of EHRs that is often overlooked is how invaluable they can be when disasters strike. In the wake of Hurricane Harvey’s recent devastation of the greater Houston, Texas area and Hurricane Irma’s potentially imminent destruction of Florida, it is certainly a point worth making.

Is your hospital ready to face Mother Nature’s wrath? If not, Primary Protection: Enhancing Health Care Resilience for a Changing Climate, a toolkit from the Department of Health and Human Services, provides an in-depth guide for how to create sustainable and resilient hospitals in the face of climate change and natural disasters.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Man Moves Paralyzed Legs Using Device That Stimulates Spinal Cord

Researchers say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control.

from Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How the Healthcare Cloud is Revolutionizing Patient Care

As consumers do more research about their healthcare plans and treatment options, providers that offer cloud-based solutions and technology will be more competitive.

from Fortinet

There have been countless ideas about how the cloud could transform the healthcare space and patient care. As healthcare cloud adoption has grown, however, the initial focus has largely been on its ability to store massive amounts of data and expedite the exchange of patient health information.

These two capabilities have primarily been harnessed through medical research and electronic medical records (EMRs). The big data analysis and storage capacity that cloud computing provides has made new forms of medical research possible, while EMRs have streamlined patient records and simplified sharing between physicians. While these advances are beneficial to patient care on a broad level, cloud adoption in healthcare has not had the same effect on people’s day-to-day lives that it has had in other industries.

That’s starting to change, however, as patients are beginning to force the same consumer-focused approach to healthcare as they have to retail.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Are Medical Robots the Future for Physical and Behavioral Therapy?

Socially assistive medical robots are being developed to help patients rehabilitate from stroke or brain injury, and conduct autism behavioral therapy.

from Medical News Bulletin

Fifteen years ago, Dr. Maja Mataric founded the field of socially assistive robotics, which centers around helping people with convalescence and rehabilitation using the power of social influence to change behavior. A professor of neuroscience, pediatrics, and computer science at the University of Southern California (USC), Dr. Mataricrecently spoke to Jennifer Abbasi of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) about her work with socially assistive robots.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.