5 Technologies Modernizing Today’s Hospitals

Here are some of the developments that keep medical care at the forefront of modern technology.

by Dixie Somers

Hospitals have increasingly become not just places of healing, but innovative scientific and technical environments. As populations soar and insurance costs rise, healthcare has become a competitive field where more effective solutions are in demand. Here are some of the developments that keep medical care at the forefront of modern technology.

1. Genome Mapping

Medical researchers have explored and identified a large portion of our genetic makeup. They can now analyze your specific genetic condition to determine both the medicines and treatments likely to do you the most good, as well as those that could put you at risk. They can now evaluate either parent or infant genes and identify which diseases or medical conditions that the child may be at risk of as he/she grows. This allows hospitals to more effectively treat, and even prevent, many medical problems.

2. Computerized Records

Electronic health records, or EHR, have transformed the way hospitals manage patient information. Hard copy files, forms, and patient care charts that could be lost or damaged are being replaced by digital versions. Hospital staff can call up your complete medical history on a computer screen or tablet with a few clicks or taps. With cloud storage and data backups, your medical files will be available permanently, and they can be made accessible over the internet from anywhere you happen to be, whether at a local clinic or vacationing in Rome. Nearly all hospitals are opting for cross-platform solutions for information archiving that allows a range of computer systems to store and retrieve the same files. If you were to get a rare virus, specialists around the world can promptly review your file and consult on a solution.

3. Locator Technology

Wandering patients, intrusive visitors, errant staff, and misplaced equipment have always been a problem for busy hospitals. If a facility has only a few oxygen monitors, you need to know where they are at all times. RFID, or radio frequency ID tags, each emit a distinct radio signal that’s recorded electronically for the associated device. These signals are recorded by self-identified scanners placed throughout the hospital and stored with time stamps. Some RFID ranges are over 300 feet. Hospital personnel can determine the location of the equipment. RFID tags can be added to wearable badges or even uniforms, allowing the same system to track patients and personnel. Analyzing this data helps to suggest improvements that increase the level of patient care.

4. Electrosurgery

Electrical generators are used to perform some procedures with greater effectiveness, precision, and sanitation. The hospital version allows adjustments of a high-frequency current for the task at hand. This current is transmitted to the patient’s tissue via needles, bulbs, or other implements to make incisions, cauterize blood vessels, or vaporize cancerous tumors. In some cases the current is not applied directly but used to heat another surgical instrument. Mega Power electrosurgical generators are sophisticated instruments serving a variety of needs, from removing moles to internal surgery.

5. Modern Prosthetics

At one time, most prosthetic devices used to restore mobility to amputees or handicapped patients were both imprecise and expensive. They often required extended programs of physical therapy before the patient was able to effectively use the devices. It was particularly a problem with pediatric patients, as children would quickly outgrow their prostheses. Today we have 3-D printers that can produce custom-designed objects out of inexpensive plastics, often to specifications within the width of a human hair. Highly personalized prosthetics can be designed and reproduced in a day or two, making them both more effective and far more affordable that those from previous generations.

As modern technologies become tools of medicine, we’re beginning to see possibilities that were once science fiction. While medicine has had its failures, hospital care is gradually becoming a more exact science.


Dixie Somers is a freelance writer and blogger for business, home, and family niches. Dixie lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and is the proud mother of three beautiful girls and wife to a wonderful husband.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Here’s A Growing Job That Earns More Than $100K: The Nurse Technologist

Slowly but surely, technology is invading every workplace in America. Now it’s nursing’s turn.

from Forbes

Demand is growing rapidly for nurse informaticists, a role that combines traditional nursing with expertise in systems, analysis and design and has an average salary of more than $100,000. The explosion of tech in healthcare has spawned this surge in demand.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Health Care Information on the Cloud—or Anywhere. Is It Really Safe?

Why is it even on the cloud? If it is unsafe, can it be made safe? What can I, as a business owner or business manager, do about it?

by Jerry Adcock

The short answer is that all depends on the people that host the data, access the data, and that own the data. The long answer is a little more complicated. Why the concern, though? Why is it even on the cloud? If it is unsafe, can it be made safe? What can I, as a business owner or business manager, do about it? Those questions and more will be answered in a 3-part series.

First, why this is a concern? Health information contains an incredible amount of personal and confidential information. It typically contains the patient’s social security number, address, phone, email, insurance provider, and medical history including a detailed history of office visits, lab tests and prescriptions. This is a treasure trove of information. And it’s all kept in one place, along with thousands, tens of thousands, or even millions of other health records. With this kind of information, an identity thief can make a lot of money with very little effort. Additionally, with all this info in one place, it becomes a single point of failure.

That single point of failure is a huge concern for healthcare companies. An attack on that sensitive data might come through a poorly configured firewall, an email embedded with malware, like ransom ware, or through careless or even negligent employees accidentally browsing to a nefarious web site. That gold mine of information is then put at risk with one single entry point: perhaps an employee clicks on a link from Apple that states a purchase has been refunded to their account and ransomware is launched, encrypting their entire hard drive. The medical facility is then faced with a choice: take the chance that they can somehow quickly restore the integrity and availability of the data, or pay the ransom and avoid any potential litigation arising from not being able to access patient information.

But that begs another question: Why is our data even on the cloud? Shouldn’t it be in the hands of the medical facilities that own the data? Wouldn’t it be safer there? There are a lot of factors that have driven data to the cloud, but probably the two most significant are economy of scale, and cost.

With data in the cloud a medical facility can rapidly increase their computing power, storage, or ability to electronically service patents for a small monthly fee, instead of doling out thousands of dollars on new servers and the accompanying infrastructure. Flip a switch, metaphorically speaking, and the new systems are online. On-site IT staffing requirements can be reduced, instead of always trying to keep up with the latest and greatest software and hardware, that cost is largely offloaded to the hosting company. And with the right platform, patient data can also be mined for meaningful patterns to help predict trends and direct business decisions. Health information can be sanitized, stripping it of all personal identifiable information and then sold to a research college, research company, or a marketing company.

The data mining possibilities are staggering. Imagine local hospitals being able to pool their resources and react, within hours, to a significant health concern based on current and historical data. With much more primitive tools, this is exactly what Dr. John Snow did with Cholera in 1854 in London.

Does it not make sense why so much of our health information is computerized and why so much of the computerized data is kept in the cloud? Which brings us to our main question is it really safe on the cloud? More on that later.


Jerry Adcock is a freelance writer with 20 years of embedded systems engineering experience.

Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

As AI Spreads Through Healthcare, Ethical Questions Arise

As AI Spreads Through Healthcare, Ethical Questions Arise

from HealthcareITNews

As U.S. hospitals work to transform their IT infrastructure, workflows and data management processes, an impressive number of them are doing with the help of artificial intelligence, a new report from Infosys shows. That demands awareness around new staffing and training processes.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

How Artificial Intelligence is Revolutionizing Healthcare

Here’s how AI algorithms and software are improving the quality and availability of healthcare services.

from The Next Web

There’s currently a shortage of over seven million physicians, nurses and other health workers worldwide, and the gap is widening. Doctors are stretched thin — especially in underserved areas — to respond to the growing needs of the population.

Meanwhile, training physicians and health workers is historically an arduous process that requires years of education and experience.

Fortunately, artificial intelligence can help the healthcare sector to overcome present and future challenges. Here’s how AI algorithms and software are improving the quality and availability of healthcare services.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

5 Things Data Scientists Want Hospital Leaders to Know

Four data scientists discuss five data challenges they wish their healthcare partners understood.

from Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review

Before approaching high-level predictive or prescriptive analytics, successful healthcare organizations must lay the right groundwork. However, many organizations struggle with how to do so.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Digital Apps for Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics

Emergency medicine and pediatrics are two areas where an array of apps help physicians do their jobs.

from HealthcareDive

Doctors across the hospital spectrum are using digital tools to support clinical decision-making, increase patient engagement and improve quality of care. More than half (51%) of recently interviewed healthcare professionals are using an app at the point of care, according to a new KLAS Research report.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

Study Shows Patients Like Remote Monitoring Via Mobile App for Follow-Up Care

Out of 32 women in the study who had access to the app, 30 (97%) agreed or strongly agreed that their follow-up care was convenient.

from HealthcareDive

One obstacle that has hindered adoption of technology in healthcare has been doubt over its ability to replace in-person care. However, results such as these are slowly helping to break down barriers holding technology back, especially as patients increasingly indicate their preference for more consumer-friendly services.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

20 Medical Technology Advances: Medicine in the Future

Dr. Bertalan Mesko, PhD, discusses 20 technologies that will shape the future landscape of medicine.

from Medical Futurist

As there are so many amazing things going on worldwide in medicine and healthcare, a shortlist of some of the greatest ideas and developments would give us a glimpse into the future of medicine. It is always a challenge to detect the projects with the biggest potential to be used in everyday medical practices, but here are the most promising candidates for fulfilling this notion.

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Disclaimer: The viewpoint expressed in this article is the opinion of the author and is not necessarily the viewpoint of the owners or employees at Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC.

10 Disruptive Technologies That Will Transform Pharma

Enormous technological changes are heading our way and they will transform pharma.

from Medical Futurist

It’s fascinating to witness how disruptive innovations can truly change the way healthcare is delivered and medicine is practiced. Enormous technological changes are heading our way and they will transform pharma, too.

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